World Table Tennis Championships

The World Table Tennis Championships have been held since 1926, biennially since 1957. Five individual events, which include men's singles, women's singles, men's doubles, women's double and mixed doubles, are currently held in odd numbered years. The World Team Table Tennis Championships, which include men's team and women's team events, were first their own competition in 2000. The Team Championships are held in even numbered years.

World Table Tennis Championships
StatusActive
GenreGlobal sports event
Date(s)c. April–May
FrequencyAnnual
Inaugurated1926 (1926)
Organised byITTF

In the earlier days of the tournament, Hungary's men's team was a dominant force, winning the championships 12 times. This was followed by a short period of dominance by Japan in the 1950s. From the 1960s onwards, China emerged as the new dominant power in this tournament and, with the exception of 1989–2000, when Sweden won four times, China continues to dominate the sport. China's men's team holds a record 20 world team championship titles.

In the 1950s, Japan's women team was a force to be reckoned with winning a total of 8 titles. The Chinese women started their strong grip on the world team championships from the 1970s onwards. They have only lost twice since 1975. China holds 21 women's team titles.

TrophiesEdit

There are 7 different trophies presented to the winners of the various events, held by winning associations, and returned for the next world championships.[1]

  • Singles competition:
  • St. Bride Vase for Men's Singles, donated in 1929 by C.Corti Woodcock, member of the exclusive St. Bride Table Tennis Club in London, after Fred Perry of England won the title in Budapest
  • Geist Prize for Women's Singles, donated in 1931 by Dr. Gaspar Geist, President of the Hungarian Table Tennis Association
  • Doubles competition:
  • Iran Cup for Men's Doubles; first presented at the 1947 World Championships by the Shah of Iran
  • W.J. Pope Trophy for Women's Doubles; donated in 1948 by the ITTF Honorary general secretary W.J. Pope
  • Heydusek Cup for Mixed Doubles; donated in 1948 by Zdenek Heydusek, Secretary of the Czechoslovakia Association.
  • Team competition:
    • Swaythling Cup for Men's Team, donated in 1926 by Lady Baroness Swaythling, mother of the first ITTF President, Ivor Montagu
    • Corbillon Cup for Women's Team, donated in 1933 by Marcel Corbillon, President of the French Table Tennis Association
      The German women's team won the Cup in 1939, and the original Cup disappeared during Berlin occupation after World War II; the current Corbillon Cup is a replica made in 1949.

In addition, the Egypt Cup is presented to the next host of world championships. The Cup was donated by King Farouk of Egypt in 1939, when the championships were held in Cairo, Egypt.

ChampionshipsEdit

The ITTF held individual events and team events separately for the first time in 1999 and 2000 respectively, and 2001 was the last time individual and team events were held together. Starting in 2003 individual events and team events were held separately again and each continue to be held separately every other year.

Number Year Host City Events
1 1926   London, United Kingdom 5
2 1928   Stockholm, Sweden 6
3 1929   Budapest, Hungary 6
4 1930   Berlin, Germany 6
5 1931   Budapest, Hungary 6
6 1932   Prague, Czechoslovakia 6
7 1933   Baden bei Wien, Austria 6
8 1933   Paris, France 7
9 1935   London, United Kingdom 7
10 1936   Prague, Czechoslovakia 7
11 1937   Baden bei Wien, Austria 7
12 1938   London, United Kingdom 7
13 1939   Cairo, Egypt 7
14 1947   Paris, France 7
15 1948   London, United Kingdom 7
16 1949   Stockholm, Sweden 7
17 1950   Budapest, Hungary 7
18 1951   Vienna, Austria 7
19 1952   Mumbai, India 7
20 1953   Bucharest, Romania 7
21 1954   London, United Kingdom 7
22 1955   Utrecht, Netherlands 7
23 1956   Tokyo, Japan 7
24 1957   Stockholm, Sweden 7
25 1959   Dortmund, Germany 7
Number Year Host City Events
26 1961   Beijing, China 7
27 1963   Prague, Czechoslovakia 7
28 1965   Ljubljana, Yugoslavia 7
29 1967   Stockholm, Sweden 7
30 1969   Munich, Germany 7
31 1971   Nagoya, Japan 7
32 1973   Sarajevo, Yugoslavia 7
33 1975   Kolkata, India 7
34 1977   Birmingham, United Kingdom 7
35 1979   Pyongyang, North Korea 7
36 1981   Novi Sad, Yugoslavia 7
37 1983   Tokyo, Japan 7
38 1985   Gothenburg, Sweden 7
39 1987   New Delhi, India 7
40 1989   Dortmund, Germany 7
41 1991   Chiba City, Japan 7
42 1993   Gothenburg, Sweden 7
43 1995   Tianjin, China 7
44 1997   Manchester, United Kingdom 7
45 1999   Eindhoven, Netherlands 5
45 2000   Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia 2
46 2001   Osaka, Japan 7
47 2003   Paris, France 5
47 2004   Doha, Qatar 2
48 2005   Shanghai, China 5
Number Year Host City Events
48 2006   Bremen, Germany 2
49 2007   Zagreb, Croatia 5
49 2008   Guangzhou, China 2
50 2009   Yokohama, Japan 5
50 2010   Moscow, Russia 2
51 2011   Rotterdam, Netherlands 5
51 2012   Dortmund, Germany 2
52 2013   Paris, France 5
52 2014   Tokyo, Japan 2
53 2015   Suzhou, China 5
53 2016   Shah Alam, Malaysia 2
54 2017   Düsseldorf, Germany 5
54 2018   Halmstad, Sweden 2
55 2019   Budapest, Hungary 5
55 2020   Busan, South Korea 2
56 2021   Houston, United States 5
56 2022   Chengdu, China 2
57 2023   Durban, South Africa 5
Individual and Team Individual Team

World Veterans Table Tennis ChampionshipsEdit

Since 1982, the Senior Veterans Table Tennis Championships are held every two years by the Swaythling Club International have been held. All players who are at least 40 years old in the year of the event are eligible to play. The ladies and gentlemen play each in eight age groups, the seniors 40, 50, 60, 65, 70, 75, 80 and 85 in singles and doubles for the titles. A previous qualification is not required.

The previous venues of the Senior World Championships:

Edition Year Host Dates Competitors Nations
1 1982   Gothenburg May 1982 450 21
2 1984   Helsinki June 1984 650 38
3 1986   Rimini June 1986 1100 38
4 1988   Zagreb June 1988 1650 45
5 1990   Baltimore June 1990 1100 46
6 1992   Dublin June 1992 1300 48
7 1994   Melbourne April 1994 1800 49
8 1996   Lillehammer June 1996 1950 49
9 1998   Manchester 17-27 June 1998 1400 53
10 2000   Vancouver 21-27 May 2000 1850 57
11 2002   Lucerne June 2002 2750 63
12 2004   Yokohama 30 May - 5 June 2004 2384 47
13 2006   Bremen 15 - 20 June 2006 3650 59
14 2008   Rio de Janeiro 24 - 30 May 2008 1378 52
15 2010   Hohhot 7 - 12 June 2010 2065 51
16 2012   Stockholm 25 June - 1 July 2012
17 2014   Auckland 12 - 17 May 2014 1670
18 2016   Alicante 23 - 29 May 2016 4561
19 2018   Las Vegas 18-23 June 2018 1021
20 2020   Bordeaux 8-14 June 2020

Medal tableEdit

  • As of 2019:
RankNationGoldSilverBronzeTotal
1  China145103159407
2  Hungary6858.575.5202
3  Japan483673157
4  Czech Republic2834.559121.5
5  Romania16.510.51946
6  Great Britain153061106
7  Sweden131512.540.5
8  United States9.522031.5
9  Austria615.535.557
10  Germany516.521.543
11  South Korea5154363
12  North Korea491326
13  Yugoslavia31113.527.5
14  Soviet Union34714
15  France231823
16  Chinese Taipei125.58.5
17  Singapore1258
18  Poland03.57.511
19  Hong Kong0222.524.5
20  Belgium0213
21  Belarus01.51.53
22  Croatia00.52.53
23  Luxembourg00.500.5
  Spain00.500.5
25  Egypt002.52.5
26  Greece001.51.5
27  Denmark0011
  India0011
  Italy0011
  Portugal0011
  Vietnam0011
32  Netherlands000.50.5
Totals (32 nations)373378685.51436.5

Results of Individual and Team EventsEdit

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ "The World Championship Trophies- A Retrospective". ittf.com. ITTF. Archived from the original on 30 May 2010. Retrieved 22 June 2010.

External linksEdit