Volta Region

Introduction

Volta Region
A view of amedzope town from mounitain gemi.jpg
Flag of Volta Region
Flag
Location of Volta in Ghana
Location of Volta in Ghana
CountryGhana
CapitalHo
Districts25
Government
 • Regional MinisterArchibald Yao Letsa[1]
 • Deputy Regional MinisterMaxwell Blagogee
Area
 • Total20,570 km2 (7,940 sq mi)
Area rankRanked 4th
Population
 (2010 Census)
 • Total2,118,252
 • RankRanked 7th
 • Density100/km2 (270/sq mi)
GDP (PPP)
 • Year2014
 • Per capita$3,974
GDP (Nominal)
 • Year2014
 • Per capita$1,902
Time zoneGMT
Area code(s)036
ISO 3166 codeGH-TV
HDI (2017)0.594[2]
medium · 4th
Websitehttp://voltaregion.gov.gh/

Volta Region (or Volta), is one of Ghana's sixteen administrative regions, with Ho designated as its capital.[3][4] It is located west of Republic of Togo and to the east of Lake Volta. Divided into 25 administrative districts, the region is multi-ethnic [5]and multilingual, including groups such as the Ewe, the Guan, and the Akan peoples. The Guan peoples include the Lolobi, Likpe, Akpafu, Buem, and Nkonya( now part of Oti region) people, et al. This region was carved out of the Volta Region in December 2018 by the New Patriotic Party

BackgroundEdit

 
British Togoland shown in pale green

The Volta region was formed by the state union of the former British Togoland which was part of the German protectorate of Togoland. It was administered as part of the Gold Coast by the British and later renamed Trans-Volta Togoland.[6]

DemographicsEdit

The native and largest ethnic group of the Volta Region (Togoland / British Togoland) are the Ewe people (68.5% of the population). They consist of several sub groups such as the Anlo Ewe, Tongu Ewe, Wedome and Avenor Ewe. Other ethnicities include the Guan people (forming 9.2% of the population), the Akan people (8.5%), and the Gurma people (6.5% of the population).[7]

AdministrationEdit

The Volta region is run by a Regional Coordinating Council (RCC) and a District Assembly. The RCC is made up of the Volta Regional Minister who is the political head and his deputy as well as representatives of the Regional House of Chiefs, the District Chief Executives of the Volta region, the Presiding Members of the 12 Districts Assemblies and representatives of the various decentralized Ministries, Departments and Agencies in the Volta region. Each district is run by a District Assembly.[8]

Regional Commissioners and MinistersEdit

The current Regional Minister, Archibald Letsa was appointed in February 2017.[9]

Districts of the Volta RegionEdit

 
Districts of the Volta Region

Before the regional demarcation in December 2018[10], the region had 25 districts consisting of 5 municipal and 20 ordinary districts with all the administrative changes as of December 2012.[11] After the census, the Oti Region was carved out of it, reducing the size of the region and the number of administrative districts to 18.

Current Districts since December 2018
# District Capital District/Municipal Chief Executive Start Date
1 Adaklu District Adaklu Waya Kadey Phanel Donkoh 1 June 2017[12]
2 Afadjato South District Ve Golokwati James Etornam Flolu 1 June 2017[13]
3 Agotime Ziope District Kpetoe John Kwaku Amanya 1 June 2017[14]
4 Akatsi North District Ave-Dakpa Prince Sodoke Amuzu 1 June 2017[15]
5 Akatsi South District Akatsi Leonelson Adzidogah 1 June 2017[16]
6 Anloga District Anloga Seth Yormewu 15 May 2018[17]
7 Central Tongu District Adidome Thomas Moore Zonyarah 1 June 2017[18]
8 Ho Municipal Ho Prosper Kofi Pi-Bansah 1 June 2017[19]
9 Ho West District Dzolokpuita Ernest Victor Apau 1 June 2017[20]
10 Hohoe Municipal Hohoe Andrews Teddy Ofori 1 June 2017[21]
11 Keta Municipal Keta Godwin Edudji Effah 1 June 2017[22]
12 Ketu North Municipal District Dzodze Anthony Avogbedor 1 June 2017[23]
13 Ketu South Municipal Denu Edem Elliot Agbewornu 1 June 2017[24]
14 Kpando Municipal District Kpandu Ernest Theophilus Quist 1 June 2017[25]
15 North Dayi District Anfoega Kudjo Edmund Attah 1 June 2017[26]
16 North Tongu District Battor Dugame Richard Collins Arku 7 January 2017[27]
17 South Dayi District Kpeve New Town Patrick Mallet 1 June 2017[28]
18 South Tongu District Sogakope Emmanuel Louis Agama 1 June 2017[29]

The following districts are now within the boundaries of the Oti Region which was formally created on 15 February 2019.[30]

District Capital
Biakoye District Nkonya Ahenkro
Jasikan District Jasikan
Kadjebi District Kadjebi
Krachi East District Dambai
Krachi Nchumuru District Chindiri
Krachi West District Kete Krachi
Nkwanta North District Kpassa
Nkwanta South District Nkwanta

ConstituenciesEdit

The Volta Region had 19 constituencies in the election in December 2000 and 24 constituencies in December 2004 parliamentary election. Four new constituencies were created by the Electoral Commission prior to the December 2012 parliamentary election, increasing the number of constituencies to 26.[31] [32]

EducationEdit

UniversitiesEdit

Nurses' Training and Colleges of EducationEdit

Senior High SchoolsEdit

  • Vakpo Secondary School
  • Kpedze Senior High School
  • Peki Senior High School
  • Shia Senior High School
  • Peki Senior High Technical School (Pestech)
  • Kpeve Senior High Technical School
  • Have Technical Institute
  • Anfoega Senior High School
  • Taviefe Senior High School
  • Agate Senior High School


Togoland CongressEdit

The Togoland Congress (TCP) was a political party formed in 1951 to campaign for the unification of the Ewe people in British Togoland and French Togoland as a separate Ewe state. The party was defeated in the May 1956 UN plebiscite in British Togoland, which resulted in the unification of British Trans-Volta Togoland with Gold Coast, which later became independent as Ghana.[33][34][35]

On 9 May 1956, a vote was conducted to decide the future disposition of British Togoland and French Togoland. The native and dominant ethnic group, the Ewe people, were divided between the two Togos. British Togoland inhabitants voted in favor of state union with the Gold Coast, and the Togo Ewe state was incorporated with Gold Coast.[36][37]

There was vocal opposition to the incorporation of Togoland into modern Ghana, from the Ewe people who voted (42%) against in British Togoland, as the Ewe wanted the unification of the Ewe people in British Togoland and French Togoland as a separate Ewe state (modern Togo).[38][39]

Recently, a campaign for the cessation of some part of the Volta Region from Ghana to be known as "Western Togoland" is being led by a group calling itself Homeland Study Group Foundation. The group is led by Charles Kormi Kudzodzi.[40][41][42][43][44][45][46]

TourismEdit

Theora video of Tagbo Falls in Hohoe, Hohoe Municipal, Volta region.

Recreation areasEdit

Museum

MountainsEdit

Other Tourist AttractionsEdit

Waterfalls

Notable native citizensEdit

Notable native citizens of Volta
# Citizen Settlement
1 Erica Nego Ho
2 Jerry Rawlings Keta
3 Kofi Awoonor Wheta
4 Peter Bossman Ho
5 Ave Kludze Hohoe
6 Fiifi Fiavi Kwetey Nogokpo
7 Dzifa Ativor Abutia
8 Dr Ephraim Amu Peki
9 Komla Dumor Aflao
10 Camidoh Aflao
11 Stonebwoy Alakple
12 Mz Vee Dzodze
13 John Dumelo Hohoe
14 Philip Gbeho Vodza
15 Kofi Adjorlolo Klikor
16 Edem Dzodze
17 John Peter Amewu Hohoe


ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ http://ghana.gov.gh/index.php/governance/regional-ministers
  2. ^ "Sub-national HDI - Area Database - Global Data Lab". hdi.globaldatalab.org. Retrieved 2018-09-13.
  3. ^ "Ghana Districts: A repository of all Local Assemblies in Ghana". ghanadistricts.com. Retrieved 2020-02-07.
  4. ^ "VOLTA REGION". Visit Ghana. Retrieved 2020-02-07.
  5. ^ "One District One Factory (1D1F)". www.1district1factory.gov.gh. Retrieved 2020-05-25.
  6. ^ Beigbeder, Yves (1 January 1994). International monitoring of plebiscites, referenda and national elections - Self-determination and Transition to Democracy. Dordrecht: Martinus Nijhoff Publishers. p. 131 of 340. ISBN 978-0-7923-2563-5. Retrieved 2009-11-24.
  7. ^ "Volta". Government of Ghana. Retrieved 2015-05-03.
  8. ^ "Volta Region - political administration". Retrieved 2009-11-24.
  9. ^ "Regional Ministers Approved". www.ghanaweb.com. Ghana Web. 18 February 2017. Retrieved 31 March 2020.
  10. ^ Kaledzi, Isaac (26 June 2019). "Ghana: Six new regions created after a referendum". Africa Needs. Retrieved 18 December 2019.
  11. ^ "BREAK DOWN OF METROPOLITAN, MUNICIPAL AND DISTRICT ASSEMBLIES". GhanaDistricts.com. Archived from the original on 2012-12-12. Retrieved 2012-12-22.
  12. ^ "Adaklu District Assembly". ghanadistricts.com. Ministry of Local Government and Rural Development. Retrieved 2 February 2020.
  13. ^ "Afadjato District Assembly Leaders". ghanadistricts.com. Ministry of Local Government and Rural Development. Retrieved 2 February 2020.
  14. ^ "Agotime Ziope District Assembly". ghanadistricts.com. Ministry of Local Government and Rural Development. Retrieved 2 February 2020.
  15. ^ "Akatsi North District Assembly". ghanadistricts.com. Ministry of Local Government and Rural Development. Retrieved 2 February 2020.
  16. ^ "Akatsi South District". ghanadistricts.com. Ministry of Local Government and Rural Development. Retrieved 2 February 2020.
  17. ^ "Anloga District Assembly". ghanadistricts.com. Ministry of Local Government and Rural Development. Retrieved 2 February 2020.
  18. ^ "Central Tongu". ghanadistricts.com. Ministry of Local Government and Rural Development. Retrieved 2 February 2020.
  19. ^ "Ho Municipal Assembly". ghanadistricts.com. Ministry of Local Government and Rural Development. Retrieved 2 February 2020.
  20. ^ "Ho West District Assembly". ghanadistricts.com. Ministry of Local Government and Rural Development. Retrieved 2 February 2020.
  21. ^ "Hohoe Municipal Assembly". ghanadistricts.com. Ministry of Local Government and Rural Development. Retrieved 2 February 2020.
  22. ^ "Keta Municipal". ghanadistricts.com. Ministry of Local Government and Rural Development. Retrieved 2 February 2020.
  23. ^ "Ketu North Municipal Assembly". ghanadistricts.com. Ministry of Local Government and Rural Development. Retrieved 2 February 2020.
  24. ^ "Ketu South Municipal Assembly". ghanadistricts.com. Ministry of Local Government and Rural Development. Retrieved 2 February 2020.
  25. ^ "Kpando Municipal Assembly". ghanadistricts.com. Ministry of Local Government and Rural Development. Retrieved 2 February 2020.
  26. ^ "North Dayi District Assembly". ghanadistricts.com. Ministry of Local Government and Rural Development. Retrieved 2 February 2020.
  27. ^ "North Tongu District Assembly". ghanadistricts.com. Ministry of Local Government and Rural Development. Retrieved 2 February 2020.
  28. ^ "South Dayi District Assembly". ghanadistricts.com. Ministry of Local Government and Rural Development. Retrieved 2 February 2020.
  29. ^ "South Tongu District". ghanadistricts.com. Ministry of Local Government and Rural Development. Retrieved 2 February 2020.
  30. ^ "Oti Region". ghanadistricts.com. Ministry of Local Government and Rural Development. Retrieved 2 February 2020.
  31. ^ 2012 parliamentary election. myjoyonline.com.
  32. ^ "EC Creates 45 New Constituencies". Modern Ghana. Retrieved 2020-02-07.
  33. ^ Daniel Miles McFarland, Historical Dictionary of Ghana, 1985, p. 173
  34. ^ "Opinion: History of Trans Volta Togoland". www.myjoyonline.com. Retrieved 2020-02-07.
  35. ^ "On Dec. 13, 1946: British Togoland Trusteeship approved by the United Nations". Edward A. Ulzen Memorial Foundation. Retrieved 2020-02-07.
  36. ^ "5. British Gold Coast/Togoland (1946-1957)". uca.edu. Retrieved 2020-02-07.
  37. ^ "British Togoland Mandate". www.britishempire.co.uk. Retrieved 2020-02-07.
  38. ^ McLaughlin & Owusu-Ansah (1994), "The Politics of the Independence Movements".
  39. ^ Brown, David (1980). "Borderline Politics in Ghana: the National Liberation Movement of Western Togoland". The Journal of Modern African Studies. 18 (4): 575–609. doi:10.1017/S0022278X00014750. ISSN 1469-7777.
  40. ^ "Court denies 10 members of Western Togoland movement bail". www.ghananewssummary.com. Retrieved 2020-01-29.
  41. ^ AfricaNews (2019-05-16). "Ghana keen on crashing 'Western Togoland' separatist dream". Africanews. Retrieved 2020-02-07.
  42. ^ Vorsah, Sabina (2019-11-20). "JUST IN: Ghana's Secret Agenda Against Western Togoland, Also Known British Togoland Exposed". Ghananewsonline.com.gh. Retrieved 2020-02-07.
  43. ^ "3 symbols of Independence-seeking Western Togoland". Pulse Gh. 2019-05-09. Retrieved 2020-02-07.
  44. ^ British Togoland. ISBN 1107427053.
  45. ^ Ghana, News. "Yeboah Benjamin writes: Trans Volta Togoland". Retrieved 2020-02-07.
  46. ^ "Sharp facts about 'Western Togoland'". BBC News Pidgin. 2019-05-10. Retrieved 2020-02-07.

External linksEdit

Coordinates: 7°00′N 0°30′E / 7.000°N 0.500°E / 7.000; 0.500