Vartan Adjemian

  (Redirected from Vardan Adjemyan)

Vartan Adjemian (Armenian: Վարդան Աճեմյան, Russian: Вартан Аджемян; born April 27, 1956 in Yerevan, Armenia) is an Armenian composer of orchestral, operatic and chamber music whose works have been performed worldwide.[1]

Vartan Adjemian
Composer Vartan Adjemian.JPG
Vartan Adjemian, 2008
Born (1956-04-27) April 27, 1956 (age 64)
OccupationComposer
EraContemporary
ChildrenArus Adjemian, Natella Adjemian

CareerEdit

Adjemian studied composition with prominent Armenian composer Lazarus Saryan (son of Martiros Saryan) at the Yerevan Komitas State Conservatory from 1973–1981.

In 1987, Adjemian was awarded the National Prize of the Armenian SSR (for this Symphony No. 1). His music has been performed in Armenia, Bulgaria, the Czech Republic, Finland, Georgia, Iceland, Poland, Russia, the UK, Switzerland, and the United States. In 2007, six of his major works have been commissioned by BIM Edition (Switzerland). He has been a member of SUISA since 2008.

Adjemian has taught composition at the Yerevan Komitas State Conservatory since 1987, and was appointed a professor in 2001. He has been Head of the Composition Department since 2002.[2]

FamilyEdit

His grandfather, Vardan Ajemian (1905–1977) was the General Stage Director of the National Theatre of Armenia and his grandmother was Arus Asryan (1904–1987), one of the leading actress of the same theatre. His father, Alexander Adjemian (1925–1987), was a composer, author of seven symphonies, chamber works and popular songs. His daughter is a prominent Armenian pianist.[3]

Major worksEdit

OrchestralEdit

  • Symphonic Poem, 1976;
  • Concerto (vocalise), soprano, mezzo-soprano, large orchestra, 1981;
  • Concerto for Orchestra, 1981;
  • Symphony No. 1, 1986;
  • Symphony No. 2 (in memoriam Alexander Adjemian), large orchestra, 1989;
  • Piano Concerto No. 1 (vocalise), 33 mixed voices, piano, large orchestra, 1991;
  • Concerto for cello and large orchestra, 1993;
  • Festive Overture, 1995;
  • Concerto, flute, large orchestra, 1996;
  • Overture in C Major, 22 strings, 2000;
  • Faith (song) for large symphonic orchestra and choir, 2001;
  • Symphony No. 3 (dedicated to Edvard Mirzoyan), 22 strings, 2002;
  • Chants of Spring and Love, soprano and orchestra, 2003;
  • Piano Concerto No. 2, piano, big orchestra, 2005
  • Adventure for alto saxophone solo, piano and string orchestra, 2008

Chamber musicEdit

  • Sonata No. 1, flute, piano, 1975;
  • Sonata for alto flute and cello, 1983;
  • Sonata No. 2, flute, piano, 1984;
  • Trio No. 1, violin, cello, piano, 1987;
  • Sonata Fantasy for cello and piano, 1993;
  • Sonata for violin and piano, 1995;
  • Fantasy for tuba, piano, 1998;
  • Eternity poem for voice, violin, cello, piano, 1996;
  • Quintet, piccolo, tuba, double bass, piano, vibraphone, 1998;
  • String Quartet (in memoriam Lazarus Saryan), 1998;
  • Overture in C major, 2000;
  • Trio No. 2, violin, cello, piano, 2004;
  • Novel for viola and piano, 2007

VocalEdit

  • Five Songs (texts by Gurgen Mahari, Vahan Terian) for mezzo-soprano and piano, 1979;
  • Ballade (text by Gurgen Mahari) for soprano, string quartet and double bass, 1980;
  • Hayastan, Five Songs (text by Hovhannes Shiraz) for mezzo-soprano and piano, 1985;
  • Lyric Songs (texts by Hovhannes Hovhannisyan), 1993;
  • Eternity (song cycle, vocalise), soprano, violin, cello, piano, 1996;
  • The Nights of Artamet, song cycle (texts by Gurgen Mahari), 1996;
  • Chants of Spring and Love (Tagհ garnan yev siro) (text by Grigoris Aghtamartsi), soprano, 22 strings, 2002

PianoEdit

  • Three Pieces, 1973;
  • Sonata No. 1, 1974;
  • Five Pieces, 1975;
  • Sonata No. 2, 1975;
  • The Bells (Ghoghanjner), poem, 1996;
  • Sonata No. 3, 1999;
  • Rubato, poem, 2000;
  • Frescoes (Vormnankarner) poem, 2001;
  • 9 Views (pieces), 2007

OperaEdit

  • The Death of Kikos (2-act comic opera), 1978 (performed in Russian translation by Tamara Demuryan)

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ "Editions Bim | Vartan Adjemian". www.editions-bim.com. Retrieved 2017-02-07.
  2. ^ Talento, Romeo. "Vardan Ajemyan – The Living Composers Project". www.composers21.com. Retrieved 2017-02-07.
  3. ^ http://www.arus-piano.com Archived 2011-01-28 at the Wayback Machine Arus Adjemian