Todd Gifford May[1] (born 1955 in New York City, New York) is a political philosopher who writes on topics of anarchism, poststructuralism, and post-structuralist anarchism. He is currently Class of 1941 Memorial Professor of Philosophy at Clemson University.[2]

Todd Gifford May
Born1955
Alma materPenn State University
Era21st-century philosophy
RegionWestern philosophy
SchoolContinental
InstitutionsClemson University
Main interests
political philosophy
Notable ideas
post-structuralist anarchism

CareerEdit

Art academic Allan Antliff described May's 1994 The Political Philosophy of Poststructuralist Anarchism as "seminal", and credited the book with introducing "post-structuralist anarchism", later abbreviated as "post-anarchism".[3] May has published works on major poststructuralist philosophers, including Gilles Deleuze and Michel Foucault.[4][5] He also wrote books on more general topics accessible to the general reader, including Death,[6] Our Practices, Our Selves, or, What It Means to Be Human,[7] Friendship in an Age of Economics: Resisting the Forces of Neoliberalism,[8] A Significant Life: Human Meaning in a Silent Universe,[9] A Fragile Life: Accepting Our Vulnerability.[10]

May is also the philosophical advisor to the NBC television show The Good Place.[11]

BibliographyEdit

  • Between Genealogy and Epistemology (1993). University Park: Pennsylvania State University Press. ISBN 978-0-271-00905-6.
  • The Political Philosophy of Poststructuralist Anarchism (1994). University Park: Pennsylvania State University Press. ISBN 978-0-271-01046-5.[12]
  • Reconsidering Difference (1997). University Park: Pennsylvania State University Press. ISBN 978-0-271-01658-0.
  • Our Practices, Our Selves, or, What It Means to Be Human (2001). University Park: Pennsylvania State University Press. ISBN 978-0-271-02086-0.
  • Operation Defensive Shield (2003). Sydney: Pluto Press. ISBN 978-0-7453-2063-2. Written in collaboration with Muna Hamzeh.
  • The Moral Theory of Poststructuralism (2004). University Park: Pennsylvania State University Press. ISBN 978-0-271-02585-8.
  • Gilles Deleuze (2005). Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. ISBN 978-0-521-84309-6.
  • Philosophy of Foucault (2006). Montreal: McGill-Queen's University Press. ISBN 978-0-7735-3169-7.
  • The Political Thought of Jacques Ranciere: Creating Equality (2008). Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press. ISBN 978-0-7486-3586-3.
  • Death (2008). Acumen Publishing. ISBN 1-84465-164-9.
  • Friendship in an Age of Economics: Resisting the Forces of Neoliberalism (2014). New York: Lexington Books. ISBN 978-0-739-19284-9.
  • A Significant Life: Human Meaning in a Silent Universe (2015). Chicago: University of Chicago Press. ISBN 978-0-226-23567-7.
  • Nonviolent Resistance: A Philosophical Introduction (2015). Cambridge: Polity Books. ISBN 978-0-745-67118-5.
  • A Fragile Life: Accepting Our Vulnerability (2017). Chicago: University of Chicago Press. ISBN 978-0-226-43995-2.
  • A Decent Life: AcceptingMorality for the Rest of Us (2019). Chicago: University of Chicago Press. ISBN 978-0-226-60974-4.

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ "Curriculum Vitae" (PDF). Clemson University.
  2. ^ Bieber, Matt. "Todd May". The Believer.
  3. ^ Antliff, Allan (2007). "Anarchy, Power, and Poststructuralism". SubStance. 36 (2, issue 113: The Future of Anarchism): 56–66. JSTOR 25195125.
  4. ^ "Gilles Deleuze: An Introduction". Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews. June 2005.
  5. ^ Anthony A. Defalco (14 August 2008). "A Review of "Philosophy of Foucault (European Philosophy Series)". Educational Studies. 44: 77–82. doi:10.1080/00131940802225119.
  6. ^ Cave, Stephen (September 12, 2009). "Better late than never". Financial Times.
  7. ^ Fillion, Réal (April 1, 2010). "Our Practices, Our Selves, or, What It Means to Be Human". Dialogue: Canadian Philosophical Review. 42 (1): 150–153. doi:10.1017/S0012217300004273.
  8. ^ Weiskopf, Richard. "Friendship and counter-conduct in the neoliberal regime of truth". Ephemera. 13 (3): 683–693.
  9. ^ Metz, Thaddeus (19 August 2015). "A Significant Life: Human Meaning in a Silent Universe". Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews.
  10. ^ Zaretsky, Robert (October 10, 2017). "Matters Large and Small: Reading Todd May's "A Fragile Life" in the Wake of Hurricane Harvey". Los Angeles Reviews of Books.
  11. ^ "Philosophy on TV: "The Good Place"". Blog of the APA. 21 June 2017. Retrieved 11 January 2018.
  12. ^ Widmer, Kingsley (1996). "Notes on Some Recent Anarchisms". Social Anarchism (21): 88–97. ISSN 0196-4801.

Further readingEdit

External linksEdit