Tiropita or tyropita (τυρóπιτα 'cheese-pie') is a Greek layered pastry of the börek family, made with layers of buttered phyllo and filled with a cheese-egg mixture.[1] It may be an individual-size free-form wrapped shape, or a larger pie that is portioned.

Tiropita
Tiropita Greek dish.jpg
Tiropita with garnish
TypeBörek
Place of origin Greece
Main ingredientsPhyllo, cheese

OriginEdit

A number of scholars suggest that the ancient Greek placenta cake plakoun and it's Eastern Roman (Byzantine) descendant, plakountas tetyromenous ("cheesy placenta") are the ancestors of modern tiropita (börek or banitsa).[2][3][4]

OriginEdit

It has been suggested that it descends from the Byzantine dish called plakountas tetyromenous and en tyritas plakountas (Byzantine Greek: εν τυρίτας πλακούντας) "cheesy placenta," itself a descendant of the food placenta, a baked layered cheese dish in Roman cuisine.[5][3][4] Cato included a recipe for placenta in his De Agri Cultura (160 BC).[6] {{bquote|Shape the placenta as follows: place a single row of tracta along the whole length of the base dough. This is then covered with the mixture [cheese and honey] from the mortar. Place another row of tracta on top and go on doing so until all the cheese and honey have been used up. Finish with a layer of tracta...place the placenta in the oven and put a preheated lid on top of it.|author=Cato the Elder|source=De Agri Cultura 160 BC[3]

Another theory is that layered dishes like tiropita have their origins in Turkish cuisine and may trace back to layered pan-fried breads developed by the Turks of Central Asia before their westward migration to Anatolia in the late Middle Ages.[7][8] (cf. Baklava)

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Tyropita (Cheese puffs)
  2. ^ Rena Salaman, "Food in Motion the Migration of Foodstuffs and Cookery Techniques" from the Oxford Symposium on Food Cookery, Vol. 2, p. 184
  3. ^ a b c Faas, Patrick (2005). Around the Roman Table. University of Chicago Press. p. 184-185. ISBN 0226233472.
  4. ^ a b Speros Vryonis The Decline of Medieval Hellenism in Asia Minor, 1971, p. 482
  5. ^ Rena Salaman, "Food in Motion the Migration of Foodstuffs and Cookery Techniques" from the Oxford Symposium on Food Cookery, Vol. 2, p. 184
  6. ^ Cato the Elder. "De Agricultura".
  7. ^ Algar, Ayla Esen (1985). "The Complete Book of Turkish Cooking". ISBN 0-7103-0334-3. Cite journal requires |journal= (help)
  8. ^ Perry, Charles. "The Taste for Layered Bread among the Nomadic Turks and the Central Asian Origins of Baklava", in A Taste of Thyme: Culinary Cultures of the Middle East (ed. Sami Zubaida, Richard Tapper), 1994, ISBN 1-86064-603-4.