The Farmer Takes a Wife (1953 film)

The Farmer Takes a Wife is a 1953 Technicolor musical comedy film starring Betty Grable and Dale Robertson. The picture is a remake of the 1935 film of the same name which starred Janet Gaynor and Henry Fonda. Grable and Dale Robertson first appeared together in the movie Call Me Mister (1951).

The Farmer Takes a Wife
Farmerwife.JPG
Directed byHenry Levin
Produced byFrank P. Rosenberg
Written byMarc Connelly (play)
Walter Bullock
Sally Benson
Joseph Fields
Based onThe Farmer Takes a Wife
1934 play
by Frank B. Elser
Rome Haul
1929 novel
by Walter D. Edmonds
StarringBetty Grable
Dale Robertson
Thelma Ritter
Music byHarold Arlen
Dorothy Fields
Orch./Arr.
Cyril J. Mockridge
CinematographyArthur E. Arling
Edited byLouis R. Loeffler
Distributed by20th Century Fox
Release date
  • July 1953 (1953-07)
Running time
81 minutes
CountryUnited States
LanguageEnglish
Box office$1,150,000 (US)[1]

PlotEdit

During the 19th century, where Molly Larkins (Betty Grable), the girlfriend of rough-and-tumble canal-boat captain Jotham Klore (John Carroll) she hires mild-mannered farmer Daniel Harrow (Dale Robertson) to work on the boat. Molly and Dan fall in love and marry.[2]

CastEdit

SongsEdit

Harold Arlen & Dorothy Fields composed the following songs for the movie:

  • "Can You Spell Schenectady?"
  • "The Erie Canal"
  • "I Could Cook"
  • "I Was Wearin' Horse Shoes"
  • "Look Who's Been Dreaming"
  • "On The Erie Canal"
  • "Somethin' Real Special"
  • "Today I Love Everybody"
  • "We're Doin' It For The Natives In Jamaica"
  • "We're In Business"
  • "When I Close My Door"
  • "With The Sun Warm Upon Me"
  • "Yes!"

Radio adaptationEdit

The Farmer Takes a Wife was presented on Best Plays June 28, 1953. The one-hour adaptation starred John Forsythe and Joan Lorring.[3]

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ 'The Top Box Office Hits of 1953', Variety, January 13, 1954
  2. ^ http://www.allmovie.com/movie/the-farmer-takes-a-wife-v16816
  3. ^ Kirby, Walter (June 28, 1953). "Better Radio Programs for the Week". The Decatur Daily Review. p. 44. Retrieved July 1, 2015 – via Newspapers.com.  

External linksEdit