Steve Meister

Steve Meister (born April 21, 1958) is a former professional tennis player from the United States. Meister's highest singles ranking was World No. 69, which he reached in August 1984. During his career, he won 8 doubles titles and achieved a career-high doubles ranking of World No. 20 in July 1984.

Steve Meister
Country (sports) United States
Born (1958-04-21) April 21, 1958 (age 62)
New York, New York, U.S.
Height6 ft 4 in (1.93 m)
PlaysRight-handed
CollegePrinceton University
Singles
Career record30–62
Career titles0
Highest rankingNo 69
Doubles
Career record107–97
Career titles7
Highest rankingNo. 20

Meister was born in New York City, and is Jewish.[1][2] He graduated from Princeton University in 1980 with a degree in Civil Engineering.[1] He turned professional in May 1980, and retired in 1986.[1]

He then founded Meister Financial Group, Inc. in 1987 as a wholesale mortgage lending corporation.[1] He served as the U.S. Men’s Tennis Coach of the 1989 Maccabiah Games and the 1993 Maccabiah Games.[1] He received a Master of Science in Finance in 2004 from Florida International University.[1]

He was elected to the Miami Dade County Hall of Fame in 2005.[1]

Career finalsEdit

Doubles (6 titles, 3 runner-ups)Edit

Result W/L Date Tournament Surface Partner Opponents Score
Win 1. 1981 Tel Aviv, Israel Hard   Van Winitsky   John Feaver
  Steve Krulevitz
3–6, 6–3, 6–3
Win 2. 1982 Caracas, Venezuela Hard   Craig Wittus   Eric Fromm
  Cary Leeds
6–7, 7–6, 6–4
Win 3. 1982 Boston, U.S. Clay   Craig Wittus   Freddie Sauer
  Schalk van der Merwe
6–2, 6–3
Win 4. 1983 Tampa, U.S. Carpet   Tony Giammalva   Eric Fromm
  Drew Gitlin
3–6, 6–1, 7–5
Win 5. 1983 Maui, U.S. Hard   Tony Giammalva   Mike Bauer
  Scott Davis
6–3, 5–7, 6–4
Loss 1. 1983 Hong Kong Hard   Sammy Giammalva Jr.   Drew Gitlin
  Craig Miller
2–6, 2–6
Win 6. 1983 Johannesburg, South Africa Hard   Brian Teacher   Andrés Gómez
  Sherwood Stewart
6–7, 7–6, 6–2
Loss 2. 1984 Tokyo Outdoor, Japan Hard   Mark Dickson   David Dowlen
  Nduka Odizor
7–6, 4–6, 3–6
Loss 3. 1984 Johannesburg, South Africa Hard   Eliot Teltscher   Tracy Delatte
  Francisco González
6–7, 1–6

ReferencesEdit

External linksEdit