St John the Baptist's Church, Collingham

St John the Baptist's Church, Collingham is a Grade I listed parish church of the Church of England[2] in the village of Collingham, Nottinghamshire.

St John the Baptist's Church, Collingham
Church of St. John the Baptist, South Collingham - geograph.org.uk - 53849.jpg
St John the Baptist's Church, Collingham
53°8′32.84″N 0°45′59.72″W / 53.1424556°N 0.7665889°W / 53.1424556; -0.7665889Coordinates: 53°8′32.84″N 0°45′59.72″W / 53.1424556°N 0.7665889°W / 53.1424556; -0.7665889
LocationCollingham, Nottinghamshire
CountryEngland
DenominationChurch of England
History
DedicationSt John the Baptist
Architecture
Heritage designationGrade I listed[1]
Administration
ParishCollingham
DeaneryNewark and Southwell
ArchdeaconryNewark
DioceseDiocese of Southwell and Nottingham

HistoryEdit

The church dates from the 12th century. Restoration work was undertaken by the Rector, Rev. Joseph Mayor, in 1846. Another restoration was carried out in 1862–1863 by J. H. Hakewill, when the gallery was removed and the arches were restored, the chancel walls raised and a new timber roof provided. Other work included stuccoing the walls, restoring memorial tablets, reglazing the windows with cathedral glass, and inserting new stone dressings. A new pulpit and lectern in pine and the altar rail in oak were installed. Tablets of zinc were fixed to the walls displaying the Ten Commandments. A number of new open benches of Memel timber were placed in the nave, to match those installed at the time of the restoration in 1846. [3]

The tower was restored in 1886 and there was a further restoration in 1890.

List of incumbentsEdit

  • Walter, clerk 1186
  • Geoffrey c. 1200–1216
  • Giles of Alderton until 1262
  • Giles de Erdyngton 1262–1269
  • Richard of Rowell 1269
  • John of Drax 1298
  • William of London c. 1344
  • William de Northalston 1336
  • William Trivet
  • Thomas de London 1349
  • Thomas de Duffeton 1349
  • Mr Richard de Rouille 1352
  • William of Hauley 1354
  • John of Dronsfield 1361
  • Simon of Morcote 1364
  • Nicholas de Barton 1366
  • Mr John de Wytlesey 1405
  • John Markanut
  • Henry Swayne 1425
  • John Floure 1445
  • Thomas Curtes
  • Thomas Magnus 1498
  • Mr William Webbe 1504
  • Robert Floyd 1523
  • William Arsheleye 1557–1577
  • Brian Barton 1577–1626
  • George Alsopp 1626–1640
  • Joseph Rhodes 1640
  • Richard Farren 1640–1641
  • Christopher Pickard 1641 onwards
  • William Towers 1662–1665
  • Thomas Hunt 1665–1667
  • John Whitehall 1667–1668
  • William Moulton 1668–1706
  • William Malton 1706–1722
  • Matthew Bradford 1722–1751
  • John Fisher 1751–1752
  • Robert Burne 1752–1791
  • William Mackenzie 1791–1794
  • John Porter 1795
  • John Todhunter 1795–1803
  • Christopher Wilson 1803–1807
  • Joseph S Pratt 1807–1813
  • Joseph Mayor 1813–1860[4]
  • Charles B Lowe 1860–1866
  • Henry Mackenzie 1866–1871
  • George William Fosbery 1871[5]–1906[6]
  • Albert James Maxwell 1907–1937[7] (formerly vicar of St Thomas' Church, Derby)
  • Graham H L Douglas Lane 1938–1968
  • Rupert John Stevens 1968–1985
  • Edward John Widdows 1985–1993
  • Alistair Aberdein Conn 1993–2004
  • William David Milner 2004–2013
  • David Yabbacombe 2013 to the present

Parish statusEdit

Collingham is one of a group of parishes which includes:

OrganEdit

The organ was enlarged by Forster and Andrews in 1863. It was replaced in 1883 by a new instrument made by Wordsworth and Maskell.

The BellsEdit

The peal of five bells dates from 1841 and was cast by Thomas Mears.[8]

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Historic England, "Church of St John the Baptist (1046050)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 25 June 2017
  2. ^ The Buildings of England: Nottinghamshire: Nikolaus Pevsner.
  3. ^ "Re-opening of South Collingham Church". Lincolnshire Chronicle. England. 20 February 1863. Retrieved 25 June 2017 – via British Newspaper Archive.
  4. ^ "Deaths". Oxford University and City Herald. England. 28 April 1860. Retrieved 25 June 2017 – via British Newspaper Archive.
  5. ^ "University Intelligence". Bedfordshire Times and Independent. England. 12 August 1871. Retrieved 25 June 2017 – via British Newspaper Archive.
  6. ^ "Collingham and its churches". Nottingham Evening Post. England. 14 November 1906. Retrieved 25 June 2017 – via British Newspaper Archive.
  7. ^ "Death of Rector of South Collingham". Nottingham Journal. England. 20 March 1937. Retrieved 25 June 2017 – via British Newspaper Archive.
  8. ^ "South Collingham, Notts S John Bapt". Dove's Guide for Church Bell Ringers. Dovemaster. 20 October 2008. Retrieved 25 June 2017.