Plaza Hotel: Difference between revisions

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==== Hilton operation ====
[[File:New York City (4374514714).jpg|thumb|Seen from the east on 58th Street]]
U.S. Realty continued to lose money through the 1930s, and was selling off its properties by 1942, including the Plaza Hotel.<ref name="Satow ch. 6">{{harvnb|Satow|2019|ps=.|loc=chapter 6}}</ref> [[Atlas Corporation]], collaborating with hotelier [[Conrad Hilton]], bought the Plaza Hotel for $7.4&nbsp;million in October 1943.{{efn-lg|Equivalent to ${{Inflation|US-GDP|7.4|1943|r=2}} million in {{Inflation year|US-GDP}}{{inflation/fn|index=US-GDP|group=lower-alpha}}}}<ref>{{Cite news|date=October 8, 1943|title=Atlas in Control of Plaza Hotel; Corporation Buys All Stock of U.S. Realty in Fifth Avenue Property|language=en-US|work=The New York Times|url=https://www.nytimes.com/1943/10/08/archives/atlas-in-control-of-plaza-hotel-corporation-buys-all-stock-of-us.html|url-status=live|access-date=November 27, 2020|issn=0362-4331}}</ref><ref>{{cite news|date=October 8, 1943|title=Atlas Interests Buy Plaza Hotel In Security Deal: Large 5th Avenue Property Sold by General Realty to Floyd B. Odlum Group|page=29|work=New York Herald Tribune|id={{ProQuest|1268022005}} }}</ref> At the time, the Plaza was 61 percent occupied, and many public areas were closed due to supply shortages caused by [[World War II]].<ref>{{cite book|last=Dabney|first=Thomas Ewing|url=https://books.google.com/books?id=FOFEAAAAIAAJ|title=The Man who Bought the Waldorf: The Life of Conrad N. Hilton|publisher=Duell, Sloan and Pearce|year=1950|page=173}}</ref><ref name="Satow ch. 7">{{harvnb|Satow|2019|ps=.|loc=chapter 7}}</ref> Hilton subsequently spent $6&nbsp;million refurbishing the hotel.{{efn-lg|Equivalent to ${{Inflation|US-GDP|6|1943|r=2}} million in {{Inflation year|US-GDP}}{{inflation/fn|index=US-GDP|group=lower-alpha}}}}<ref name="Mashayekhi 2018" /> During mid-1944, the lobby on Fifth Avenue was renovated and its mezzanine was enclosed. The Palm Court skylight, having fallen into disrepair, was removed for the installation of air conditioning equipment.<ref name="NYCL p. 14" /><ref name="Gathje p. 26">{{harvnb|Gathje|2000|ps=.|p=26}}</ref> A mezzanine was also built above the hotel's former courtyard,<ref name="NPS p. 5" /><ref name="nyt19820927" /><ref name="Gura p. 95">{{harvnb|Gura|2015|ps=.|p=95}}</ref> and the room itself became the Court Lounge.<ref name="NYCL p. 58" /> The brokerage office at the ground level's northwestern corner was turned into the Oak Bar, which opened in January 1945, and EF Hutton was relegated to the Fifth Avenue lobby's mezzanine.<ref name="Brown p. 188">{{harvnb|Brown|1967|p=188}}; {{harvnb|Gura|2015|p=95}}; {{harvnb|Landmarks Preservation Commission|2005|ps=.|p=14}}</ref> The contractor for the renovations may have been Frederick P. Platt & Brother, which was the Plaza Hotel's primary contractor in the 1940s.<ref name="NYCL p. 14" />
 
The Plaza Hotel Corporation, the hotel's operator, was merged into the [[Hilton Worldwide|Hilton Hotels Corporation]] in 1946.<ref>{{Cite news|date=June 7, 1946|title=$60,000,000 Hilton Hotel Concern Formed as Four Companies Merge; Plaza, Stevens, Palmer House, Dayton-Biltmore Combined|language=en-US|work=The New York Times|url=https://www.nytimes.com/1946/06/07/archives/60000000-hilton-hotel-concern-formed-as-four-companies-merge-plaza.html|url-status=live|access-date=November 27, 2020|issn=0362-4331}}</ref> The following year, the Plaza Rendez-Vous opened within the old grill room space.<ref name="Harris p. 69">{{harvnb|Harris|1981|ps=.|p=69}}</ref> By the early 1950s, women were allowed inside the Oak Room and Bar during the evenings and summers. The Oak Room and Bar still acted as a men-only space before 3 p.m., while the stock exchanges operated.<ref>{{harvnb|Gathje|2000|p=142}}; {{harvnb|Harris|1981|pp=55–56}}; {{harvnb|Landmarks Preservation Commission|2005|ps=.|p=15}}</ref>
 
Hilton sold the hotel in 1953 to Boston industrialist A.M. "Sonny" Sonnabend for $15&nbsp;million,{{efn-lg|Equivalent to ${{Inflation|US-GDP|15|1953|r=2}} million in {{Inflation year|US-GDP}}{{inflation/fn|index=US-GDP|group=lower-alpha}}}} and immediately leased it back for 2.5 years.<ref>{{Cite news|date=October 15, 1953|title=$15,000,000 Paid for Plaza Hotel; Hilton Interests Take Lease Back From the Sonnabend Group of Boston, Mass|language=en-US|work=The New York Times|url=https://www.nytimes.com/1953/10/15/archives/15000000-paid-for-plaza-hotel-hilton-interests-take-lease-back-from.html|url-status=live|access-date=November 28, 2020|issn=0362-4331}}</ref><ref name="Gathje p. 163">{{harvnb|Gathje|2000|ps=.|p=163}}</ref> Sonnabend became president of national restaurant chain [[Childs Company]] in 1955, and Childs purchased the Plaza that November, for $6.2&nbsp;million in stock.{{efn-lg|Equivalent to ${{Inflation|US-GDP|6.2|1955|r=2}} million in {{Inflation year|US-GDP}}{{inflation/fn|index=US-GDP|group=lower-alpha}}}}<ref>{{Cite news|date=November 18, 1955|title=Childs Approves Plaza Purchase; Holders Also Agree to Lease 3 Other Hotels, Change Corporate Name|language=en-US|work=The New York Times|url=https://www.nytimes.com/1955/11/18/archives/childs-approves-plaza-purchase-holders-also-agree-to-lease-3-other.html|access-date=July 9, 2020|issn=0362-4331}}</ref> The same year, the ground-floor Plaza Restaurant was renamed the Edwardian Room.<ref>{{harvnb|Brown|1967|p=192}}; {{harvnb|Gathje|2000|p=30}}; {{harvnb|Landmarks Preservation Commission|2005|ps=.|p=15}}</ref> Air conditioning was also installed in each guest room around this time.<ref>{{Cite news|last=Grutzner|first=Charles|date=July 8, 1956|title=Year of the Air Conditioning; New York Hotels Putting Millions Into Cooling and Renovations|language=en-US|work=The New York Times|url=https://www.nytimes.com/1956/07/08/archives/year-of-the-air-conditioning-new-york-hotels-putting-millions-into.html|url-status=live|access-date=November 28, 2020|issn=0362-4331}}</ref> Childs became the Hotel Corporation of America (HCA) in 1956,<ref>{{Cite news|date=February 23, 1956|title=Childs Co. Changes Name|language=en-US|work=The New York Times|url=https://www.nytimes.com/1956/02/23/archives/childs-co-changes-name.html|url-status=live|access-date=November 28, 2020|issn=0362-4331}}</ref> and Hilton's lease was renewed indefinitely that year.<ref>{{Cite news|date=March 1, 1956|title=Hotel Corporation of America Buys 2 Hotels for $14,930,000|page=15|work=Daily Boston Globe|id={{ProQuest|842256840}} }}</ref> HCA sold the Plaza to [[Lawrence Wien]] in November 1958 for $21 million{{efn-lg|Equivalent to ${{Inflation|index=US-GDP|value=21|start_year=1958}} million in {{Inflation/year|index=US-GDP}}{{inflation/fn|index=US-GDP|group=lower-alpha}}}} and immediately leased it back for 25 years.<ref>{{Cite news|date=November 21, 1958|title=Plaza Hotel Sold for 21 Millions; Wien Pays Record Sum for 5th Ave. Building -- Chain to Lease It Back|language=en-US|work=The New York Times|url=https://www.nytimes.com/1958/11/21/archives/plaza-hotel-sold-for-21-millions-wien-pays-record-sum-for-5th-ave.html|url-status=live|access-date=November 27, 2020|issn=0362-4331}}</ref> The transaction included curtailing Hilton's lease to April 1960,<ref>{{Cite news|date=January 2, 1959|title=Plaza Hotel Title Passes|language=en-US|work=The New York Times|url=https://www.nytimes.com/1959/01/02/archives/plaza-hotel-title-passes.html|url-status=live|access-date=November 28, 2020|issn=0362-4331}}</ref> upon which HCA assumed the operating lease.<ref>{{Cite news|date=April 1, 1960|title=Plaza Hotel in Shift; Hotel Corporation to Take Over on Lease Today|language=en-US|work=The New York Times|url=https://www.nytimes.com/1960/04/01/archives/plaza-hotel-in-shift-hotel-corporation-to-take-over-on-lease-today.html|url-status=live|access-date=November 27, 2020|issn=0362-4331}}</ref>
 
==== Sonnabend operation ====
The Plaza Hotel experienced financial difficulties during the early 1960s, but under Sonnabend's management, the Plaza's financial outlook improved by 1964.<ref name="nyt19791230">{{Cite news|last=Cuff|first=Daniel F.|date=December 30, 1979|title=The Plaza Hotel: A Moneymaking Fairyland|language=en-US|work=The New York Times|url=https://www.nytimes.com/1979/12/30/archives/the-plaza-hotel-a-moneymaking-fairyland-but-its-an-easy-target-for.html|access-date=November 28, 2020|issn=0362-4331}}</ref><ref name="Satow ch. 9">{{harvnb|Satow|2019|ps=.|loc=chapter 9}}</ref> The facade of the Plaza Hotel was cleaned in late 1960, the first time that the exterior had been fully cleaned since its construction.<ref>{{Cite news|date=November 25, 1960|title=Sidewalk Foremen Watch Face-Lifting At the Plaza Hotel|language=en-US|work=The New York Times|url=https://www.nytimes.com/1960/11/25/archives/sidewalk-foremen-watch-facelifting-at-the-plaza-hotel.html|url-status=live|access-date=November 28, 2020|issn=0362-4331}}</ref> This was followed in 1962 by extensive exterior and interior renovations, which resulted in the redecoration of many of the suites and public rooms.<ref>{{Cite news|last=Ennis|first=Thomas W.|date=September 9, 1962|title=Hotels Spruce Up as Rivalry Rises|language=en-US|work=The New York Times|url=https://www.nytimes.com/1962/09/09/archives/hotels-spruce-up-as-rivalry-rises-they-answer-newcomers-with-vast.html|url-status=live|access-date=November 28, 2020|issn=0362-4331}}</ref><ref name="wsj19650823">{{cite news|date=August 23, 1965|title=The Grand Hotel: Aging but Still Elegant, Gotham's Storied Plaza Prospers on Nostalgia Edwardian Opulence, Service Enchant Jet-Age Patrons|page=1|work=Wall Street Journal|id={{ProQuest|132999458}} |issn=0099-9660 }}</ref> Four of the hotel's hydraulic elevators were replaced with electric elevators in 1964,<ref>{{Cite news|date=April 6, 1964|title=Plaza to Install New Elevators|language=en-US|work=The New York Times|url=https://www.nytimes.com/1964/04/06/plaza-to-install-new-elevators.html|url-status=live|access-date=November 28, 2020|issn=0362-4331}}</ref> including the three elevators at the 58th Street lobby.<ref name="nyt19760415">{{Cite news|last=McElheny|first=Victor K.|date=April 15, 1976|title=Plaza's Old Elevators Wheezing to a Halt|language=en-US|work=The New York Times|url=https://www.nytimes.com/1976/04/15/archives/plazas-old-elevators-wheezing-to-a-halt.html|access-date=November 28, 2020|issn=0362-4331}}</ref> A second phase of renovations was announced the same year, which entailed enlarging some public rooms and replacing the ground-floor barber shop with a [[Trader Vic's]] bar.<ref name="nyt19641117" /><ref name="Satow ch. 9" /> The ballroom's foyer and stair hall were combined during this renovation.<ref name="NYCL p. 40" /><ref name="nyt19641117" /> The improvements were completed by 1965, having cost $9 million.{{efn-lg|Equivalent to ${{Inflation|US-GDP|9|1965|r=2}} million in {{Inflation year|US-GDP}}{{inflation/fn|index=US-GDP|group=lower-alpha}}}}<ref name="wsj19650823" />
 
Upon Sonny Sonnabend's death in 1964, his son Roger took over the hotel.<ref name="Satow ch. 10" /> Further changes to the hotel's ownership occurred the next year, when [[Sol Goldman]] and [[Alexander DiLorenzo]]'s firm Wellington Associates bought an [[Option (finance)|option]] to obtain a half-interest in the underlying land from Hilton.<ref>{{Cite news|date=August 31, 1965|title=Wellington to Get Land Under Plaza|language=en-US|work=The New York Times|url=https://www.nytimes.com/1965/08/31/archives/wellington-to-get-land-under-plaza.html|url-status=live|access-date=November 28, 2020|issn=0362-4331}}</ref> Gender restrictions at the Oak Room were removed in 1969, after the [[National Organization for Women]] held a sit-in to protest the men-only policy during middays.<ref>{{harvnb|Gathje|2000|p=142}}; {{harvnb|Harris|1981|p=56}}; {{harvnb|Landmarks Preservation Commission|2005|ps=.|p=15}}</ref> HCA, by then renamed Sonesta International Hotels,<ref>{{Cite news|date=October 23, 1969|title=Hotel America To Change Name Nov. 10 to Sonesta|page=64|work=Hartford Courant|id={{ProQuest|550282274}} }}</ref> announced another round of renovations in 1971. This included the redecoration of the Grand Ballroom.<ref name="Gura p. 95" /><ref>{{Cite news|last=Edwards|first=Russell|date=August 27, 1971|title=Plaza Plans ‘Original Elegance’ in ‘World of Tomorrow’|language=en-US|work=The New York Times|url=https://www.nytimes.com/1971/08/27/archives/plaza-plans-original-elegance-in-world-of-tomorrow.html|url-status=live|access-date=November 28, 2020|issn=0362-4331}}</ref> as well as the replacement of the Edwardian Room with a restaurant called the Green Tulip.<ref name="HarrisNYCL p. 4014" /><ref name="NYCLHarris p. 1440" /><ref name="nyt19711105">{{Cite news|last=Huxtable|first=Ada Louise|date=November 5, 1971|title=An Appraisal: An Edwardian Splendor Or Green Tulip Modern?|language=en-US|work=The New York Times|url=https://www.nytimes.com/1971/11/05/archives/an-edwardian-splendor-or-green-tulip-modern-an-edwardian-splendor.html|url-status=live|access-date=November 28, 2020|issn=0362-4331}}</ref> Sally Dryden's pink, lime, and brown design for the Green Tulip<ref name="NYCL pp. 26-27" /> received largely negative public reception.<ref name="wp19750615" /><ref name="Satow ch. 10" /><ref name="NYCL pp. 26-27">{{harvnb|Landmarks Preservation Commission|2005|ps=.|pp=26–27}}</ref> The ballroom also received a renovation at this time.<ref name="NYCL p. 36"/>
 
The renovations coincided with a decline in Sonesta's and the Plaza's finances, with the hotel recording a net negative income by 1971.<ref name="Satow ch. 10" /> Sonesta repurchased the Plaza Hotel from Wien in 1972.<ref>{{Cite news|last=Reckert|first=Clare M.|date=July 6, 1972|title=Sonesta International Takes Title to Plaza Hotel|language=en-US|work=The New York Times|url=https://www.nytimes.com/1972/07/06/archives/sonesta-international-takes-title-to-plaza-hotel-sonesta-corp-buys.html|url-status=live|access-date=November 29, 2020|issn=0362-4331}}</ref> Shortly afterward, Sonesta looked to sell its interest in the Plaza Hotel to [[Harry Helmsley]], and Wellington attempted to take over Sonesta by buying its shares.<ref>{{Cite news|last=Hammer|first=Alexander R.|date=May 10, 1973|title=Sonesta Shares Target in Deal|language=en-US|work=The New York Times|url=https://www.nytimes.com/1973/05/10/archives/sonesta-shares-target-in-deal-wellington-seeking-to-buy-up-to-a.html|url-status=live|access-date=November 29, 2020|issn=0362-4331}}</ref><ref>{{cite news|last=Gallese|first=Liz Roman|date=May 10, 1973|title=Sonesta Sought by Wellington Associates, But Such a Take-Over May Prove Difficult|page=16|work=Wall Street Journal|id={{ProQuest|133819150}}|issn=0099-9660}}</ref> Both the sale and the attempted Sonesta takeover were unsuccessful, and Wellington made an offer for Sonesta's share of the hotel in April 1974,<ref>{{cite news|last=Meyer|first=Priscilla S.|date=April 2, 1974|title=Sonesta's Plaza Hotel Is Sought by Partners In New York Concern: Wellington Associates, Which Tried Sonesta Take-Over in '73, Is Discussing Purchase|page=16|work=Wall Street Journal|id={{ProQuest|133919074}} |issn=0099-9660}}</ref> which Sonesta refused.<ref>{{cite news|date=May 3, 1974|title=Sonesta Won't Sell The Plaza, New York, To Wellington Group|page=16|work=Wall Street Journal|id={{ProQuest|133971802}}|issn=0099-9660}}</ref>
 
==== Westin ownership ====
In November 1974, [[Westin Hotels|Western International Hotels]] announced its intention to buy the Plaza Hotel from Sonesta for $25&nbsp;million.{{efn-lg|Equivalent to ${{Inflation|US-GDP|25|1974|r=2}} million in {{Inflation year|US-GDP}}{{inflation/fn|index=US-GDP|group=lower-alpha}}}}<ref>{{Cite news|date=November 13, 1974|title=Western Hotels Co. Buying the Plaza For $25‐Million|language=en-US|work=The New York Times|url=https://www.nytimes.com/1974/11/13/archives/western-hotels-co-buying-the-plaza-for-25million.html|access-date=July 9, 2020|issn=0362-4331}}</ref> The same year, the Edwardian Room was largely restored to designs by Charles Winslow, being rebranded as the Plaza Suite.<ref name="NYCL p. 27">{{harvnb|Landmarks Preservation Commission|2005|ps=.|p=27}}</ref><ref name="Harris p. 43">{{harvnb|Harris|1981|ps=.|p=43}}</ref><ref>{{Cite news|last=Goldberger|first=Paul|date=February 12, 1974|title=Plaza Turning Back Clock to ‘1907‐New’ Look|language=en-US|work=The New York Times|url=https://www.nytimes.com/1974/02/12/archives/plaza-turning-back-clock-to-1907new-look-a-softer-glow.html|url-status=live|access-date=November 28, 2020|issn=0362-4331}}</ref> Following Western International's acquisition of the Plaza, it renovated the interior spaces, cleaned the exterior, and restored many of the original designs,<ref name="nyt19820927" /><ref name="wp19750615" /> at a total cost of $200 million.{{efn-lg|Equivalent to ${{Inflation|US-GDP|200|1974|r=2}} million in {{Inflation year|US-GDP}}{{inflation/fn|index=US-GDP|group=lower-alpha}}}}<ref name="newsday19880328">{{cite news|last=Moss|first=Michael|date=March 28, 1988|title=5-Star Facelift; Trump to make over city's Plaza Hotel|page=02|work=Newsday|id={{ProQuest|277975654}} }}</ref> The four hydraulic elevators serving the Central Park South lobby, among the last of their type in the city, were also replaced with electric elevators in 1976.<ref name="nyt19760415" /> Westin also bought the Shinn murals that year for $1 million; they had not been part of the original sale.<ref>{{Cite news|date=May 18, 1976|title=Plaza Buys Murals By Everett Shinn From Old Owners|language=en-US|work=The New York Times|url=https://www.nytimes.com/1976/05/18/archives/plaza-buys-murals-by-everett-shinn-from-old-owners.html|url-status=live|access-date=November 29, 2020|issn=0362-4331}}</ref> The next year, a 204-seat theater called Cinema 3 opened in the basement.<ref>{{Cite news|last=Goldberger|first=Paul|date=March 24, 1977|title=Design Notebook: Inglorious Urban Entries See a Movie In Style Order Carved Out of Openness|language=en-US|work=The New York Times|url=https://www.nytimes.com/1977/03/24/archives/design-notebook-inglorious-urban-entries.html|url-status=live|access-date=November 29, 2020|issn=0362-4331}}</ref> The Persian Room was closed in 1978 and a clothing boutique opened in its place.<ref name="Satow ch. 10" /> Westin had planned to restore the Palm Court's skylight, but this did not happen.<ref name="newsday19880720" />
 
By the late 1970s, the Plaza Hotel was again making a net profit.<ref name="Satow ch. 10" /> Western International changed its name to Westin Hotels in 1981 and the hotel was renamed soon after, becoming ''The Westin Plaza''.<ref>{{Cite news|date=August 3, 1985|title=In Hotels View, It's Better to Give|language=en-US|work=The New York Times|url=https://www.nytimes.com/1985/08/03/business/in-hotels-view-it-s-better-to-give.html|access-date=July 9, 2020|issn=0362-4331}}</ref> However, Westin started to lose money in the late 1980s. By 1987, Westin's parent company [[Allegis Corporation]] announced its intent to sell the Plaza, generating interest from at least 150 investors.<ref>{{Cite news|last=Meyers|first=William H.|date=September 25, 1988|title=Stalking the Plaza|language=en-US|work=The New York Times|url=https://www.nytimes.com/1988/09/25/magazine/stalking-the-plaza.html|url-status=live|access-date=November 28, 2020|issn=0362-4331}}</ref> The Plaza, along with the rest of the Westin chain,<ref>{{cite news|date=October 28, 1987|title=Allegis to Sell Its Westin Unit For $1.35 Billion --- Accord With Bass Group, Aoki Moves Firm Closer To Restructuring Goal|page=1|work=Wall Street Journal|id={{ProQuest|398140080}} |issn=0099-9660}}</ref> were transferred to the [[Aoki Corporation]] and [[Robert M. Bass]] in January 1988.<ref name="wsj19880318">{{cite news|date=March 18, 1988|title=Trump Has Agreed To Purchase Plaza Hotel, Sources Say: Trump Agrees to Buy Famous Plaza Hotel From Bass and Aoki|page=2|work=Wall Street Journal|id={{ProQuest|135320103}} |issn=0099-9660}}</ref> Shortly afterward, Philip Pilevsky and [[Arthur G. Cohen]] expressed their intent to buy the Plaza and turn it into a hotel-cooperative.<ref>{{Cite news|last=Foderaro|first=Lisa W.|date=February 27, 1988|title=Plaza Hotel May Be Sold for Co-ops|language=en-US|work=The New York Times|url=https://www.nytimes.com/1988/02/27/nyregion/plaza-hotel-may-be-sold-for-co-ops.html|url-status=live|access-date=November 28, 2020|issn=0362-4331}}</ref>
Later in the 20th century, the Plaza Hotel served as home to "wealthy widows", such as performer [[Kay Thompson]], who wrote the ''[[Eloise (books)|Eloise]]'' children's book series about a young girl who lived at the hotel.<ref name="nyt20190607" /> During the Great Depression, the "wealthy widows" were considered "a tourist attraction in their own right", with their rent income keeping the hotel solvent.<ref name="Satow ch. 6" /> The hotel's other residents included playwright [[Ferenc Molnár]].<ref name="Satow ch. 6" /><ref name="Gathje p. 90">{{harvnb|Gathje|2000|ps=.|p=90}}</ref>
 
After many units were converted to condominium units in 2008, the Plaza Hotel became highly coveted among the wealthy.<ref name="Satow ch. 13" /> However, only about a third of these buyers were full-time residents, with the remainder using their Plaza condominiums as [[pied-a-terre|pieds-a-terre]].<ref>{{Cite news|last=Satow|first=Julie|date=October 24, 2014|title=Pied-à-Neighborhood|language=en-US|work=The New York Times|url=https://www.nytimes.com/2014/10/26/realestate/pieds-terre-owners-dominate-some-new-york-buildings.html|access-date=December 1, 2020|issn=0362-4331}}</ref> The residents included executives such as [[Kraft CompanyFoods]] CEO [[Robert Kraft]],<ref>{{Cite web|last=Keil|first=Braden|date=September 10, 2008|title=White Elephant|url=https://nypost.com/2008/09/10/white-elephant/|access-date=November 30, 2020|website=New York Post|language=en-US}}</ref> [[JetBlue]] CEO [[David Barger]],<ref>{{Cite news|last=Barbanel|first=Josh|date=September 30, 2007|title=Taking Refuge at the Plaza|language=en-US|work=The New York Times|url=https://www.nytimes.com/2007/09/30/realestate/30deal1.html|access-date=November 30, 2020|issn=0362-4331}}</ref> [[Bear Stearns]] CEO [[James Cayne]],<ref>{{Cite news|date=August 15, 2013|title=Bear Stearns's Cayne Lists in New York|language=en-US|work=Wall Street Journal|url=https://online.wsj.com/article/SB10001424127887324085304579011753073278332.html|access-date=November 30, 2020|issn=0099-9660}}</ref> [[Viacom (1952–2006)|Viacom]] CEO [[Thomas E. Dooley]],<ref>{{Cite web|date=November 20, 2007|title=When Is $7.8 M. Not A Lot? When It’s A Condo at The Plaza|url=https://observer.com/2007/11/when-is-78-m-not-a-lot-when-its-a-condo-at-the-plaza/|access-date=November 30, 2020|website=Observer|language=en-US}}</ref> [[Sony Music Entertainment]] CEO [[Doug Morris]],<ref>{{Cite web|last=Stone|first=Madeline|title=The CEO Of Sony Music Is Selling His Ritzy New York City Condo For $11.5 Million|url=https://www.businessinsider.com/doug-morris-is-selling-his-condo-for-115-million-2014-10|access-date=November 30, 2020|website=Business Insider}}</ref> and ''[[Idols (franchise)|Idols]]'' franchise producer [[Simon Fuller]].<ref>{{cite web|last=Alberts|first=Hana R.|title=Huxley Building Action; American Idol Creator Sells Plaza Pads|website=Curbed NY|date=October 16, 2014|url=https://ny.curbed.com/2014/10/16/10034812/huxley-building-action-american-idol-creator-sells-plaza-pads|access-date=November 30, 2020}}</ref> Other notable residents included musician [[Moby]],<ref>{{Cite web|last=Gould|first=Jennifer|date=March 13, 2020|title=Moby’s Central Park penthouse asking $5.75M|url=https://nypost.com/2020/03/13/mobys-central-park-penthouse-asking-5-8m/|access-date=November 30, 2020|website=New York Post|language=en-US}}</ref> developer [[Christian Candy]],<ref>{{Cite news|last=Barbanel|first=Josh|date=March 6, 2012|title=Candy Gets Taste of the Plaza|language=en-US|work=Wall Street Journal|url=https://online.wsj.com/article/SB10001424052970203370604577263714290343358.html|access-date=November 30, 2020|issn=0099-9660}}</ref> and fashion designer [[Tommy Hilfiger]].<ref>{{Cite news|last=Marino|first=Vivian|date=November 1, 2019|title=Tommy Hilfiger’s Duplex Sells After 11 Years on the Market (Published 2019)|language=en-US|work=The New York Times|url=https://www.nytimes.com/2019/11/01/realestate/tommy-hilfigers-duplex-sells-after-11-years-on-the-market.html|access-date=November 30, 2020|issn=0362-4331}}</ref>
 
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