Transportation in New York City: Difference between revisions

trim - while this is a useful addition, it is unfortunately too essay-like, even written with a question as a header. Moreover, this goes into synthesis territory, using quotes from unrelated projects, and is far too detailed on certain aspects.
m (Short article analyzing the battle between cyclists and motorists in New York City)
(trim - while this is a useful addition, it is unfortunately too essay-like, even written with a question as a header. Moreover, this goes into synthesis territory, using quotes from unrelated projects, and is far too detailed on certain aspects.)
[[Citibank]] sponsored the introduction of 6,000 public bicycles for the city's [[bike-share]] project, [[Citi Bike]], in mid-2013.<ref>{{cite web|title=The Summer Bicycles Took Control|url=https://www.theatlantic.com/health/archive/2013/06/the-summer-bicycles-took-control/277166/|work=The Atlantic Monthly|publisher=The Atlantic Monthly Group|access-date=June 28, 2013|author=James Hamblin|date=June 28, 2013}}</ref> Research conducted by Quinnipiac University showed that a majority of New Yorkers supported the initiative.<ref>{{cite web|title=NEW YORK CITY VOTERS BACK MAYOR'S STORM PLAN 4-1, QUINNIPIAC UNIVERSITY POLL FINDS; SLIM MAJORITY BACKS FOOD RECYCLING, BIKE RENTALS|url=http://www.quinnipiac.edu/images/polling/nyc/nyc06272013.pdf/|work=Quinnipiac University Poll|publisher=Quinnipiac University|access-date=June 28, 2013|author=Pat Smith|author2=Maurice Carroll |format=PDF|date=June 27, 2013}}</ref> Throughout the first year operations, there were more than 100,000 registered members who rode over {{convert|14,700,000|mi|km}},<ref name="nyt 2014102">{{cite news|url=https://www.nytimes.com/2014/10/29/nyregion/citi-bike-to-expand-as-new-york-city-reaches-deal-with-private-company.html?_r=0|title=New Leader Will Drive Expansion of Citi Bike|last1=Chaban|first1=Matt A.V.|date=October 28, 2014|newspaper=The New York Times|access-date=November 3, 2014|issn=0362-4331}}</ref> including 70,000 members in the first three months alone.<ref name="nyt20130815">{{cite news|url=https://www.nytimes.com/2013/08/15/nyregion/the-balancing-act-that-bike-share-riders-just-watch.html|title=The Balancing Act That Bike-Share Riders Just Watch|last=Flegenheimer|first=Matt|date=August 14, 2013|newspaper=The New York Times|access-date=February 14, 2017|issn=0362-4331}}</ref> In 2014, Citi Bike announced that it would expand its operations by 6,000 bikes and add 375 new docking stations by 2017.<ref name="nycdot 201410">{{cite news|url=http://a841-tfpweb.nyc.gov/dotpress/2014/10/citi-bike-program-in-new-york-city/#more-339|title=NYC DOT, Alta and Citi Announce Agreement to Expand and Enhance Citi Bike Program in New York City|date=October 28, 2014|access-date=November 3, 2014|url-status=dead|archive-url=https://web.archive.org/web/20141103185842/http://a841-tfpweb.nyc.gov/dotpress/2014/10/citi-bike-program-in-new-york-city/#more-339#more-339|archive-date=November 3, 2014|publisher=[[New York City Department of Transportation]]|df=mdy-all}}</ref> In November 2018, a further, five-year expansion was announced, which would double the bike-share system's service area to {{Convert|35|mi2|km2}}. In addition, the number of bicycles would more than triple, from 12,000 to 40,000.<ref>{{cite web|url=http://www.ny1.com/nyc/all-boroughs/news/2018/11/30/citi-bike-expands-as-lyft-aquires-bike-sharing-company|title=Citi Bike is Planning to Triple the Number of its Bikes in NYC|last=Tieu|first=Van|date=November 30, 2018|website=Spectrum News NY1 &#124; New York City|access-date=November 30, 2018}}</ref><ref>{{cite web|url=https://ny.curbed.com/2018/11/29/18117960/citi-bike-new-york-lyft-expansion-motivate|title=Citi Bike will dramatically expand its NYC footprint|last=Plitt|first=Amy|date=November 29, 2018|website=Curbed NY|access-date=November 30, 2018}}</ref><ref>{{cite web|url=https://www.wired.com/story/lyft-bets-bikes-nyc/|title=Lyft Expands Citi Bike in NYC, and Uber Is None too Happy|date=November 29, 2018|website=WIRED|access-date=November 30, 2018}}</ref> Stalls would be installed in the remainder of Manhattan, as well as parts of Brooklyn, Queens, and the Bronx.<ref>{{Cite news|url=https://www.nytimes.com/2019/07/16/nyregion/citi-bike-nyc-bronx.html|title=6 Years Later, Citi Bike Comes to the Bronx. (What Took So Long?)|last1=Fitzsimmons|first1=Emma G.|date=2019-07-16|work=The New York Times|access-date=2019-07-17|last2=Randle|first2=Aaron|language=en-US|issn=0362-4331}}</ref><ref>{{cite web|url=https://abc7ny.com/5398679/|title=Citi Bike expanding into the Bronx, will double service area by 2023|date=July 16, 2019|website=ABC7 New York|access-date=July 17, 2019}}</ref><ref>{{cite web|url=https://gothamist.com/2019/07/16/citi_bike_expansion.php|title=Citi Bike To Double In Size (By 2023)|date=July 16, 2019|website=Gothamist|access-date=July 17, 2019|archive-url=https://web.archive.org/web/20190717010738/https://gothamist.com/2019/07/16/citi_bike_expansion.php|archive-date=July 17, 2019|url-status=dead}}</ref>
 
A "[[green wave]]" refers to the programming of traffic lights to allow for continuous traffic flow (a series of green lights) over a number of intersections in one direction. In New York City, this “green wave” prioritizes bikers by timing traffic lights around the average biking speed, in addition to mitigating the negative effects of heavy automotive [[Traffic_congestion|congestion]].<ref>https://www1.nyc.gov/office-of-the-mayor/news/368-19/vision-zero-mayor-de-blasio-green-wave-bicycle-plan-address-cycling-fatalities---/#/0. “Vision Zero: Mayor de Blasio Announces ‘Green Wave’ Bicycle Plan to Address Cycling Fatalities—With Citywide Protected Bike Lane Network and Increased Enforcement”. The Official Website of the City of New York. July 25, 2019.</ref> After a series of bicyclist deaths in 2019, the highest death toll for cyclists in two decades, the city decided to retime traffic lights, so that vehicles would have to travel an average of {{Convert|15|mph||abbr=}} between consecutive green lights.<ref>{{Cite news|url=https://www.nytimes.com/2019/10/23/nyregion/nyc-bike-commute-green-lights.html|title=After Cyclist Deaths, City Adjusts Traffic Lights to Slow Cars|last=Hu|first=Winnie|date=2019-10-23|work=The New York Times|access-date=2019-11-04|language=en-US|issn=0362-4331}}</ref>
 
=== '''The Battle of Cyclists vs. Motorists in New York City''' ===
 
 
The battle between cyclists and motorists in cities has increased in recent years. New York City, known for inadequate driving lanes already, has residents vying over a strip of extra pavement. Many [[Driving|motorists]] regard a safe bicycle lane as a public-space disservice. Since motorists outnumber cyclists, the struggle for cyclists appears to be a long, uphill climb.
 
 
Cyclists advocate for [[Bike lane|bike lanes]] along main roads for the freedom to move faster than pedestrians without feeling endangered by automobiles. Motorists resent this notion. Todd Scott, Detroit Greenways Coalition’s executive director, states “‘What motorists… want is another lane… [to] go faster,’” <ref name=":3">{{Cite news|last=Barron|first=James|date=2019-08-18|title=The People of Central Park West Want Their Parking Spaces (Sorry, Cyclists) (Published 2019)|language=en-US|work=The New York Times|url=https://www.nytimes.com/2019/08/18/nyregion/cars-cyclists-bike-lanes-.html|access-date=2020-11-30|issn=0362-4331}}</ref> rationalizing consistent pushback from motorists.
 
 
Central Park West in NYC has widened and repositioned bike lanes. The completion goal of August 10, 2019 memorialized the first anniversary of the death of a 23-year old Australian tourist tragically hit on his bike by a truck. New York officials recognize bike lanes as a solution for [[Bicycle safety|accident]] reductions; their efforts enable drivers, bicyclists, and pedestrians to share altered roads. NYC’s transportation commissioner Polly Trottenberg has pushed for increasing bike lanes to demonstrate the city’s progress and commitment to [[Transportation safety in the United States|transportation safety]]. <ref name=":3" />
 
 
In NYC, space is always in high demand. While pre-existing sidewalks cannot shrink and subway grates can not be eliminated, [[Parking space|parking spaces]] can be removed. In 2019, 200 parking spaces along Central Park West were eliminated to allow bike lane expansion. NYC plans to remove 200 more spots in 2020-2021 to create a lane to the northern end of Central Park. <ref name=":4">{{Cite web|last=staff/shumita-basu|last2=staff/wnyc|date=2019-07-16|title=Why Do NYC Drivers And Pedestrians Loathe Cyclists?|url=http://gothamist.com/news/why-do-nyc-drivers-and-pedestrians-loathe-cyclists|access-date=2020-11-30|website=Gothamist|language=en}}</ref>
 
 
Because these measures cater to bicyclists, motorists have resisted plans. Anti-bike lane lawsuits argue “‘the push for more bike lanes has stripped the City of prime real estate,’” <ref name=":3" /> and city officials favor a small minority with prime public space. Yet, the promotion of [[Automotive industry|automobile sales]] results in crowded, narrow streets. New Yorkers have used biking as an easy, engaging, healthy alternative to maneuver the city.
 
 
While bicycling has gained popularity as a city transportation choice, it remains inferior to automobiles. By their sheer numbers, motorists leverage influence in defining city policy and infrastructure. While not consistent, cycling deaths in NYC continue to increase as cyclists share the road with powerful automobiles.<ref name=":4" /> Just as cycling has grown exponentially over the past 20 years, the sport and passion for cycling commuters will continue to grow. Policy and [[infrastructure]] will change over time to benefit the safety of these citizens in the streets. Perhaps some motorists will even switch gears.
 
 
<u>Sources:</u>
 
Barron, James. “The People of Central Park West Want Their Parking Spaces (Sorry, Cyclists).” The New York Times, The New York Times, 18 Aug. 2019, www.nytimes.com/2019/08/18/nyregion/cars-cyclists-bike-lanes-.html?fallback=0.
 
<ref name=":3" />
 
“Bike Safety.” NYC DOT - Bike Smart, www.nyc.gov/html/dot/html/bicyclists/biketips.shtml.
 
<ref>{{Cite web|title=NYC DOT - Bike Smart|url=http://www.nyc.gov/html/dot/html/bicyclists/biketips.shtml|access-date=2020-11-30|website=www.nyc.gov}}</ref>
 
“Why Do NYC Drivers And Pedestrians Loathe Cyclists?” Gothamist, Gothamist, 16 July 2019, www.gothamist.com/news/why-do-nyc-drivers-and-pedestrians-loathe-cyclists. 
 
<ref name=":4" />
 
Transportation commissioner Polly Trottenberg has pushed for increasing bike lanes to demonstrate the city’s progress and commitment to [[Transportation safety in the United States|transportation safety]].<ref>{{Cite news|last=Barron|first=James|date=2019-08-18|title=The People of Central Park West Want Their Parking Spaces (Sorry, Cyclists)|language=en-US|work=The New York Times|url=https://www.nytimes.com/2019/08/18/nyregion/cars-cyclists-bike-lanes-.html|access-date=2020-11-30|issn=0362-4331}}</ref> However, with the expansion of cycling in New York City, there has been pushback from motorists. For example, in 2019, motorists and [[Upper West Side]] residents objected after two hundred parking spaces along Central Park West were eliminated to allow bike lane expansion.<ref>{{Cite web|first=Shumita|last=Basu|date=2019-07-16|title=Why Do NYC Drivers And Pedestrians Loathe Cyclists?|url=http://gothamist.com/news/why-do-nyc-drivers-and-pedestrians-loathe-cyclists|access-date=2020-11-30|website=Gothamist|language=en}}</ref>
 
=== Dollar vans ===