V. Gordon Childe: Difference between revisions

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→‎Abercromby Professor of Archaeology: 1927–1946: "Scotland's University of Edinburgh" reads a bit oddly; there's only one, and it's clear from context where it is. Also fix typo (Eglinton)
(His birth pre-dated the federation of Australia.)
m (→‎Abercromby Professor of Archaeology: 1927–1946: "Scotland's University of Edinburgh" reads a bit oddly; there's only one, and it's clear from context where it is. Also fix typo (Eglinton))
{{Quote box|width=25em|align=right|quote="Because the early Hindus and Persians did really call themselves ''Aryans'', this term was adopted by some nineteenth-century philologists to designate the speakers of the 'parent tongue'. It is now applied scientifically only to the Hindus, Iranian peoples and the rulers of Mitanni whose linguistic ancestors spoke closely related dialects and even worshipped common deities. As used by Nazis and [[anti-semite]]s generally, the term 'Aryan' means as little as the words 'Bolshie' and 'Red' in the mouths of crusted [[tories]]."|salign = right|source=— Gordon Childe criticising the Nazi conception of an [[Aryan]] race, ''What Happened in History'', 1942.{{sfn|Childe|1942|p=150}}}}
 
In 1927, Scotland'sthe [[University of Edinburgh]] offered Childe the post of Abercromby Professor of Archaeology, a new position established in the bequest of the prehistorian [[John Abercromby, 5th Baron Abercromby|Lord Abercromby]]. Although sad to leave London, Childe took the job, moving to [[Edinburgh]] in September 1927.{{sfnm|1a1=Trigger|1y=1980|1pp=60–61|2a1=Green|2y=1981|2pp=56–57|3a1=Richards|3y=1995|3p=118}} Aged 35, Childe became the "only academic prehistorian in a teaching post in Scotland". Many Scottish archaeologists disliked Childe, regarding him as an outsider with no specialism in Scottish prehistory; he wrote to a friend that "I live here in an atmosphere of hatred and envy."{{sfn|Green|1981|pp=58–59}} He nevertheless made friends in Edinburgh, including archaeologists like [[W. Lindsay Scott]], [[Alexander Curle]], [[J. G. Callender]], and [[Walter Grant (archaeologist)|Walter Grant]], as well as non-archaeologists like the physicist [[Charles Galton Darwin]], becoming godfather to Darwin's youngest son.{{sfn|Green|1981|pp=59–60}} Initially lodging at [[Liberton, Scotland|Liberton]], he moved into the semi-residential Hotel de Vere on EglingtonEglinton Crescent.{{sfn|Green|1981|pp=72–73}}
 
At Edinburgh University, Childe focused on research rather than teaching. He was reportedly kind to his students but had difficulty talking to large audiences; many students were confused that his [[BSc]] degree course in archaeology was structured counter-chronologically, dealing with the more recent [[Iron Age]] first before progressing backward to the [[Palaeolithic]].{{sfn|Green|1981|pp=61–62}} Founding the Edinburgh League of Prehistorians, he took his more enthusiastic students on excavations and invited guest lecturers to visit.{{sfn|Green|1981|p=67}} An early proponent of [[experimental archaeology]], he involved his students in his experiments; in 1937 he used this method to investigate the [[Vitrified fort|vitrification process evident at several Iron Age forts]] in northern Britain.{{sfn|Green|1981|pp=62–63}}