Emotional reasoning: Difference between revisions

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== Reduction techniques ==
Techniques for reducing emotional reasoning include:
*Validity testing: Patients defend their thoughts and ideas using objective evidence to support their assumptions. If they cannot, they might be exposed to emotional reasoning.<ref name=":1">Ford-Martin, P. 2003. "Cognitive-behavioral therapy." Pp. 226–28 in ''The Gale Encyclopedia of Mental Disorders'' 1, edited by M. Harris and E. Thackerey. Thousand Oaks, Detroit, MI: Gale.</ref>
 
*Cognitive reversal: Patients are told of a difficult situation that they had in the past, and work with a therapist to help them address and correct their problems. This can prepare the patient for similar situations so that they do not revert to emotional reasoning.<ref name=":1" />
Validity testing: Patients defend their thoughts and ideas using objective evidence to support their assumptions. If they cannot, they might be exposed to emotional reasoning.<ref name=":1">Ford-Martin, P. 2003. "Cognitive-behavioral therapy." Pp. 226–28 in ''The Gale Encyclopedia of Mental Disorders'' 1, edited by M. Harris and E. Thackerey. Thousand Oaks, Detroit, MI: Gale.</ref>
*Guided discovery: The therapist asks the patients a series of questions designed to help them realize their cognition distortions.<ref name=":1" />
 
Cognitive*Writing reversalin a journal: Patients areform a toldhabit of writing in a difficultjournal situationto thatrecord the situations they hadface, inemotions theand thoughts they pastexperience, and worktheir withresponses aor therapistbehaviors to help them. addressThe therapist and correctpatient theirthen problems. This cananalyze preparehow the patient's formaladaptive similarthought situations sopatterns thatinfluence they do not revert to emotionaltheir reasoningbehaviors.<ref name=":1" />
*Homework: Once the patient acquires the ability to perform self-recovery and remember the insights gained from therapy sessions, the patient is tasked with reviewing sessions and reading related books to focus their thoughts and behaviors, which are recorded and reviewed for the next therapy session.<ref name=":1" />
 
Guided discovery*Modeling: The therapist askscould theuse patientsrole-playing ato seriesact ofin questionsdifferent designedways in response to helpimagined themsituations realizeso theirthat cognitionpatients distortionscould understand and model their behavior.<ref name=":1" />  
*Systematic positive reinforcement: The behavior-oriented therapist would use a reward system (systematic [[positive reinforcement]]) to motivate patients to reinforce specific behaviors.<ref name=":1" />
 
Writing in a journal: Patients form a habit of writing in a journal to record the situations they face, emotions and thoughts they experience, and their responses or behaviors to them. The therapist and patient then analyze how the patient's maladaptive thought patterns influence their behaviors.<ref name=":1" />
 
Homework: Once the patient acquires the ability to perform self-recovery and remember the insights gained from therapy sessions, the patient is tasked with reviewing sessions and reading related books to focus their thoughts and behaviors, which are recorded and reviewed for the next therapy session.<ref name=":1" />
 
Modeling: The therapist could use role-playing to act in different ways in response to imagined situations so that patients could understand and model their behavior.<ref name=":1" />  
 
Systematic positive reinforcement: The behavior-oriented therapist would use a reward system (systematic [[positive reinforcement]]) to motivate patients to reinforce specific behaviors.<ref name=":1" />
 
Negative memories and stressful life circumstances have a chance to trigger depression. The main factor for causing depression is unresolved life experiences. People who experience emotional reasoning are more likely to connect to depression. [[Emotionally focused therapy|Emotion-focused therapy]] (EFT) is a form of psychotherapy which can help people find a positive perspective of their emotional process. EFT is a research-based treatment that emphasizes emotional change, which is the goal of this therapy. EFT has two different alternative therapies for treatments: cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT), which emphasizes changing self-defeating thoughts and behaviors; and interpersonal therapy (IPT), which emphasizes changing people's skills to have better interaction with others.<ref name=":2">Andrews, L. W. 2010. "Emotion-Focused Therapy." Pp. 183–85 in ''Encyclopedia of Depression'' 1. Santa Barbara, CA: Greenwood Press.</ref>