Trade unions in The Gambia: Difference between revisions

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==== Gambia Workers' Union (GWU) ====
The [[Gambia Workers' Union]] (GWU) was founded in late 1956 by M. E. Jallow. Jallow had worked in government service and the commercial sector before organising the workers of the Gambia Construction Company into a society. This society then became the GWU, with Jallow as [[Secretary (title)|General Secretary]], and was officially registered in July 1958. Jallow worked with former GLU general secretary A. W. Loum to build up the union, which then began to stir labour unrest in the Bathurst docks in August 1959. The GWU led a series of strikes, which led to wage and bonus increases for dock workers. This success led other labourers in the city to join the GWU.<ref>Perfect, pp. 177–178</ref>[[File:ICFTU-AFRO logo.svg|thumb|Logo of [[ICFTU African Regional Organisation|ICFTU-AFRO]], to which the [[Gambia Workers' Union|GWU]] affiliated in 1963.]]
 
In February 1960, the GWU led a [[general strike]]. This strike had three motivations: to challenge the Gambia Oilseeds Marketing Board (GOMB) which had signed a contract for its [[Peanut|groundnut]] steamers to be loaded by non-unionised labour, to seek official recognition from the government and revise the mechanism of wage negotiation, and to prove its effectiveness to all workers in Bathurst by securing a vast [[minimum wage]] increase.<ref>Perfect, pp. 183–184</ref> Following the strike, the GOMB reverted to employing unionised labour, the outdated labour machinery was transformed by the establishment of Joint Industrial Councils, and the government's minimum wage was raised by 25%. The union led a second general strike in January 1961 after negotiations broke down over a 90% increase in the minimum wage. This strike was also successful, as it led to a further 13% increase in the minimum wage, and the government and employers were forced to concede a [[Checkoff|check-off]] system of dues collection.<ref>Perfect, p. 184</ref>
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