Plug compatible: Difference between revisions

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The original example of PCM mainframes was the [[Amdahl Corporation|Amdahl]] 470 [[mainframe computer]] which was plug-compatible with the [[IBM System 360]] and [[IBM System/370|370]], costing millions of dollars to develop. An IBM customer could literally remove the 360 or 370 on Friday, install the Amdahl 470, attach the same connectors from the peripherals to the channel interfaces, and have the new mainframe up and running the same software on Sunday night. Unfortunately, system status indicators for operators of the new system were very different, which introduced a learning curve for operators and service technicians.
 
Similar systems were available from [[Comparex]], [[Fujitsu]],<ref>"LEAD: Beating I.B.M. to the punch by one day, Fujitsu Ltd. announced a series of computers today that ..."{{cite web |website=NYTimes.com |title=Fujitsu Announces Mainframe |url=https://www.nytimes.com/1990/09/05/business/fujitsu-announces-mainframe.html |date=September 5, 1990}}</ref> and [[Hitachi, Ltd.|Hitachi]]. Not all were large systems.<ref>"A 3200 system can include up to 16M bytes, with virtual memory freeing programmers from artificial memory constraints. It can handle all major programming languages, such as Cobol, Fortran, PL/I, APL, Basic, and Assembler. The [[National CSS|NCSS]] 3200 series will range in price from $200,00 to $600,000."{{cite web |url=http://ieeexplore.ieee.org/iel5/2/34528/01646729.pdfdocument |title=NCSS 3200|doi=10.1109/C-M.1978.217954}}</ref><ref>Trilogy Systems Corporation was started by [[Gene Amdahl]] together with his son Carl Amdahl and Clifford Madden.{{cite news |newspaper=Computerworld |date=June 15, 1981 |url=https://books.google.com/books?id=dPLZ7QidjbEC |page=11 |title=ACSYS - new Amdahl startup}}</ref>
 
Most of these system vendors eventually left the PCM market.<ref name="greenwald19830711">{{Cite magazine |last=Greenwald |first=John |date=1983-07-11 |title=The Colossus That Works |url=http://content.time.com/time/magazine/article/0,9171,949693-2,00.html |url-status=live |url-access=subscription | magazine=TIME |archive-url=https://web.archive.org/web/20080514004334/http://www.time.com/time/magazine/article/0,9171,949693-2,00.html |archive-date=2008-05-14 |access-date=2019-05-18}}</ref><ref>"Hitachi has been in the mainframe business for 50 years and currently its AP series of systems are sold to major organisations across Japan. Hitachi Data Systems used to sell Hitachi-made IBM plug-compatible mainframes outside Japan but stopped doing so in 2000."{{cite news |newspaper=The Register |date=May 24, 2017 |title=Hitachi exits mainframe hardware business |url=https://www.theregister.co.uk/2017/05/24/hitachi_exits_mainframe_hardware}}</ref><ref>"A notable PCM failure was Storage Technology (StorageTek), which was for many years one of the more successful of the plug-compatible peripheral suppliers. StorageTek's attempt to make its own processor and become another Amdahl or HDS almost drove it out of business. It took years to recover ..."{{cite web |title=ACS Heritage Project: Chapter 30 |url=https://ia.acs.org.au/article/2017/ACS-Heritage-Project--Chapter-30.html}}</ref><ref>"Amdahl ...pulling out of the plug-compatible market in 2000 following IBM's launch of 64-bit systems."{{cite news |newspaper=Computerworld |title=Amdahl pulling out of the plug-compatible market in 2000 |url=https://www.computerworld.com/article/2589047/vertical-it/amdahl-planning-to-exit-mainframe-business.html}}</ref>
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