Jack Hawkins: Difference between revisions

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He turned down the role of ''Colonel Carne'' in ''The Glorious Gloucesters'' for [[Warwick Films]] and [[James Cook|Captain Cook]] for a project for the Rank organisation;<ref name="jack">{{cite news |url=http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article161613230 |title=JACK HAWKINS |newspaper=[[The Newcastle Sun]] |issue=11,178 |location=New South Wales, Australia |date=1 April 1954 |accessdate=30 October 2016 |page=27 |via=National Library of Australia}}</ref> neither movie was made.
 
"I'm tired of playing decent fellows", he said in a 1954 interview, "with stiff upper lip and even stiffer morals. I'm going to kill them off before they kill me as an actor. And I want stories written for me, not rejects intended for other fellows... I just inherit them from other people. Often, I find they've left the name of the actor originally suggested for the role. Always the same old names ... Errol Flynn, Gregory Peck ... five or six others. Before the script reaches them, somebody remembers me — especially if it's one of those infernally nice characters."<ref>{{cite news |url=http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article163335136 |title="I Want To Be Evil" |newspaper=[[The Newcastle Sun]] |issue=11,357 |location=New South Wales|date=9 December 1954 |accessdate=30 October 2016 |page=33 |via=National Library of Australia}} {{cite news |url=http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article163335136 |title="I Want To Be Evil" |newspaper=[[The Newcastle Sun]] |issue=11,357 |location=New South Wales|date=9 December 1954 |accessdate=30 October 2016 |page=33 |via=National Library of Australia}}</ref>
 
===International star===
In 1967 it was reported that he would direct [[Peter O'Toole]] in ''St Patrick's Battalion'' in [[Mexico]] but the film was not made.<ref>{{cite news|title=Jack Hawkins to direct O'Toole|newspaper=The Irish Times |date=10 July 1967|page= 11}}</ref>
Instead he resumed his acting career, with his voice dubbed and dialogue kept to a minimum: ''[[Shalako (film)|Shalako]]'' (1968) and ''[[Great Catherine (film)|Great Catherine]]'' (1968). In ''[[Oh! What a Lovely War]]'' (1969), playing [[Emperor Franz Joseph I of Austria]], he had no lines at all. He had an operation to restore his voice in 1968. It did not work; Hawkins could talk but only in a croaking voice.<ref>{{cite news |url=http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article107055531 |title=Actor speaks again |newspaper=[[The Canberra Times]] |volume=42, |issue=12,018 |location=Australian Capital Territory, Australia |date=4 June 1968 |accessdate=30 October 2016 |page=5 |via=National Library of Australia}}</ref>
 
"The fact that producers are still offering me work is a source of much gratitude to me", he said in 1969. "I flatter myself that when they cast me in a part it's me Jack Hawkins they want and not the person who was once Jack Hawkins... if you know what I mean. And I'm perfectly honest with anyone who hires me. I tell them exactly what they're letting themselves in for."<ref name="throat"/>
 
==Personal life==
Hawkins married actress [[Jessica Tandy]] in 1932, and the couple divorced in 1940. Together they had one daughter, Susan Hawkins (b. 1934).<ref>http://articles.latimes.com/1995-06-18/entertainment/ca-14212_1_jessica-tandy</ref> In 1947, Hawkins married Doreen Lawrence (1919–2013), and they remained married until his death in 1973.<ref>{{cite web|url=http://www.screenonline.org.uk/people/id/512405/|title=BFI Screenonline: Hawkins, Jack (1910-1973) Biography|work=screenonline.org.uk}}</ref><ref>{{cite web|url=https://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/newstopics/mandrake/10123675/Widow-of-Jack-Hawkins-dies-aged-94.html|title=Widow of Jack Hawkins dies aged 94|date=17 June 2013|work=Telegraph.co.uk}}</ref> Together they had three children, Caroline (b. 1955),<ref>{{Cite book | url=https://books.google.com/books?id=Ey59RZZaWeYC&pg=PA154&lpg=PA154#v=onepage&q=caroline%20hawkins%20daughter%20of%20jack%20hawkins | title=London Theatre Walks: Thirteen Dramatic Tours Through Four Centuries of History and Legend| isbn=9781557835161| last1=Young| first1=Jim De| last2=Miller| first2=John| year=2003}}</ref> Andrew, and Nicholas Hawkins.
 
==Death==
In May 1973, Hawkins undertook an experimental operation on his throat to insert an artificial voicebox. He started haemorrhaging and was admitted to St Stephen's Hospital, [[Fulham Road]], London in June, forcing him to drop out of ''[[The Tamarind Seed]]'' (1974), in which Hawkins was to have played a Russian general. He died on 18 July 1973,<ref>GRO Register of Deaths: SEP 1973 5a 1339 CHELSEA – John Edward Hawkins, DoB = 14 September 1910</ref> of a secondary haemorrhage. He was 62.<ref>{{cite news |url=http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article110738424 |title=JACK HAWKINS DIES, 62 |newspaper=[[The Canberra Times]] |volume=47, |issue=13,491 |date=19 July 1973 |accessdate=30 October 2016 |page=1 |via=National Library of Australia}}</ref>
 
His final appearance was in the television miniseries ''[[QB VII (miniseries)|QB VII]]''. His [[autobiography]], ''Anything For a Quiet Life'', was published after his death. He was cremated and his ashes interred at [[Golders Green Crematorium]] in north London.
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