Eudoxus of Cnidus: Difference between revisions

→‎Life: Removed around 387 BC as the timeline makes no sense. If he was born circa 390, he cannot be 23 in 387. 387 was when Plato's academy was founded.
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(→‎Life: Removed around 387 BC as the timeline makes no sense. If he was born circa 390, he cannot be 23 in 387. 387 was when Plato's academy was founded.)
Eudoxus's father Aeschines of [[Cnidus]] loved to watch stars at night. Eudoxus first travelled to [[Taranto|Tarentum]] to study with [[Archytas]], from whom he learned [[mathematics]]. While in [[Italy]], Eudoxus visited [[Sicily]], where he studied medicine with [[Philistion of Locri|Philiston]].
 
Around 387&nbsp;BC, atAt the age of 23, he traveled with the physician [[Theomedon]]—who (according to [[Diogenes Laërtius]]) some believed was his lover<ref>Diogenes Laertius; VIII.87</ref>—to [[Athens]] to study with the followers of [[Socrates]]. He eventually attended lectures of [[Plato]] and other philosophers for several months, but due to a disagreement they had a falling-out. Eudoxus was quite poor and could only afford an apartment at the [[Piraeus]]. To attend Plato's lectures, he walked the {{convert|7|mi|km}} in each direction each day. Due to his poverty, his friends raised funds sufficient to send him to [[Heliopolis (Ancient Egypt)|Heliopolis]], [[Roman Egypt|Egypt]], to pursue his study of astronomy and mathematics. He lived there for 16 months. From Egypt, he then traveled north to [[Cyzicus]], located on the south shore of the Sea of Marmara, the [[Propontis]]. He traveled south to the court of [[Mausolus]]. During his travels he gathered many students of his own.
 
Around 368 BC, Eudoxus returned to Athens with his students. According to some sources, around 367 he assumed headship of the Academy during Plato's period in Syracuse, and taught [[Aristotle]].{{Citation needed|date=September 2010}} He eventually returned to his native Cnidus, where he served in the city assembly. While in Cnidus, he built an observatory and continued writing and lecturing on [[theology]], astronomy, and [[meteorology]]. He had one son, Aristagoras, and three daughters, Actis, Philtis, and Delphis.
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