Intussusception (medical disorder): Difference between revisions

(next is clearer and more correct)
==Pathophysiology==
[[File:Intussusception EN.svg|thumb|upright=1.3|Drawing of intussusception]]
In the most frequent type of intussusception, the [[ileum]] enters the [[cecum]]. However, other types occur, such as when a part of the ileum or [[jejunum]] prolapses into itself. Almost all intussusceptions occur with the intussusceptum having been located [[Anatomical terms of location#Proximal and distal|proximal]]ly to the intussuscipiens. This is because [[peristalsis|peristaltic]] action of the intestine pulls the proximal segment into the distal segment. There are, however, rare reports of the opposite being true.
 
The part that prolapses into the other is called the ''intussusceptum'', and the part that receives it is called the ''intussuscipiens''. Almost all intussusceptions occur with the intussusceptum having been located [[Anatomical terms of location#Proximal and distal|proximal]]ly to the intussuscipiens. This is because [[peristalsis|peristaltic]] action of the intestine pulls the proximal segment into the distal segment. There are, however, rare reports of the opposite being true.
 
An anatomic ''lead point'' (that is, a piece of intestinal tissue that protrudes into the bowel lumen) is present in approximately 10% of intussusceptions.<ref>[http://www.hawaii.edu/medicine/pediatrics/pedtext/s10c04.html Chapter X.4. Intussusception ] {{webarchive|url=https://web.archive.org/web/20120826234901/http://www.hawaii.edu/medicine/pediatrics/pedtext/s10c04.html |date=2012-08-26 }} from Case Based Pediatrics For Medical Students and Residents, by Lynette L. Young, MD. Department of Pediatrics, University of Hawaii John A. Burns School of Medicine. December 2002</ref>
Anonymous user