Ay: Difference between revisions

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This is a modern supposition (although one that follows almost inevitably from Ay's position and Tut's age at the time). The past tense implies that it's "said" by ancient sources, which, given the nature of Egyptian texts, is very unlikely.
(→‎Family: adding cited sources and clarification to this section: specifically Ay's relationship to Nakhtmin (supporting the claims in the previous "Royal succession" section), and the highly debated theory that he's Nefertiti & Mutbenret's father.)
(This is a modern supposition (although one that follows almost inevitably from Ay's position and Tut's age at the time). The past tense implies that it's "said" by ancient sources, which, given the nature of Egyptian texts, is very unlikely.)
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'''Ay''' was the penultimate [[Pharaoh]] of [[Ancient Egypt]]'s [[Eighteenth dynasty of Egypt|18th dynasty]]. He held the throne of Egypt for a brief four-year period (probably 1323–1319 BC<ref>Erik Hornung, Rolf Krauss & David Warburton (editors), Ancient Egyptian Chronology (Handbook of Oriental Studies), Brill: 2006, p. 493</ref> or 1327–1323 BC, depending on which chronology is followed), although he was a close advisor to two and perhaps three of the pharaohs who ruled before him and wasis saidthought to behave been the [[power behind the throne]] during [[Tutankhamun]]'s reign. Ay's ''prenomen'' or royal name&mdash;Kheperkheperure&mdash;means "Everlasting are the Manifestations of Ra" while his birth name ''Ay it-netjer'' reads as 'Ay, Father of the God.'<ref>Peter Clayton, Chronicle of the Pharaohs, Thames & Hudson Ltd, 1994. p136</ref> Records and monuments that can be clearly attributed to Ay are rare, not only due to his short length of reign, but also because his successor, [[Horemheb]], instigated a campaign of ''[[damnatio memoriae]]'' against him and other pharaohs associated with the unpopular [[Amarna Period]].
 
==Origins==