Riding shotgun: Difference between revisions

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'''Riding shotgun''' was used to describe the guard who rode alongside a [[stagecoach]] driver, ready to use his [[shotgun]] to ward off bandits or hostile [[Native Americans in the United States|Native Americans]]. In modern use, it refers to the practice of sitting alongside the [[driver (person)|driver]] in a moving [[vehicle]]. The phrase has been used to mean giving actual or figurative support or aid to someone in a situation.<ref>{{cite web|work=dictionary.reference.com|url=http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/shotgun|title= Define Shotgun at Dictionary.com|publisher =Dictionary.com|accessdate=11 February 2013}}</ref> The earliest coining of this phrase dates to at most 1905.<ref name=phrases/>
 
== Etymology ==
The expression "riding shotgun" is derived from "[[shotgun messenger]]", a colloquial term for "express messengagecoachmessenger", when [[stagecoach]] travel was popular during the American [[American frontier|Wild West]] and the [[Colonialism|Colonial]] period in [[Australia]]. The person rode alongside the driver. The first known use of the phrase "riding shotgun" was in the 1905 novel ''The Sunset Trail'' by Alfred Henry Lewis.
 
The expression "riding shotgun" is derived from "[[shotgun messenger]]", a colloquial term for "express messengagecoach]] travel was popular during the American [[American frontier|Wild West]] and the [[Colonialism|Colonial]] period in [[Australia]]. The person rode alongside the driver. The first known use of the phrase "riding shotgun" was in the 1905 novel ''The Sunset Trail'' by Alfred Henry Lewis.
 
{{quote|Wyatt and Morgan Earp were in the service of The Express Company. They went often as guards-- "riding shotgun," it was called-- when the stage bore unusual treasure.<ref>{{cite web|url=https://books.google.com/books?id=rwg3AAAAIAAJ&pg=PA349&dq=%22riding+shotgun%22&hl=en&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwjC7NSYjJXaAhXG2VMKHUmfDZYQ6AEIKTAA#v=onepage&q=%22riding%20shotgun%22&f=false|title=The Sunset Trail|last=Lewis|first=Alfred Henry|accessdate=30 March 2018}}</ref>}}