ReadyBoost: Difference between revisions

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|archiveurl = https://web.archive.org/web/20061210044656/http://hive.net/Member/blogs/the_insider/archive/2006/05/23/15378.aspx |archivedate = 2006-12-10}}</ref>
 
== Performance ==
A system with 512&nbsp;MB of RAM (the minimum requirement for Windows Vista) can see significant gains from ReadyBoost.<ref>[http://www.anandtech.com/systems/showdoc.aspx?i=2917&p=5 AnandTech: Windows Vista Performance Guide<!-- reflinks title -->]</ref><ref>Schmid, Patrick. [http://www.tomshardware.com/reviews/windows-vista-superfetch-and-readyboostanalyzed,1532-6.html "Windows Vista's SuperFetch and ReadyBoost Analyzed:] Conclusion." Toms Hardware. 2007-01-31.</ref> In one test case, adding 1&nbsp;GB of ReadyBoost memory sped up an operation from 11.7 seconds to 2 seconds. However, increasing the physical memory (RAM) from 512&nbsp;MB to 1&nbsp;GB (without ReadyBoost) reduced it to 0.8 seconds.<ref>[http://www.anandtech.com/systems/showdoc.aspx?i=2917&p=6 AnandTech: Windows Vista Performance Guide<!-- reflinks title -->]</ref> System performance with ReadyBoost can be monitored by Windows Performance Monitor.<ref>Schultz, Greg. [http://www.techrepublic.com/blog/window-on-windows/keep-tabs-on-readyboost-with-windows-7s-performance-monitor/2257 "Keep tabs on ReadyBoost with Windows 7's Performance Monitor."] ''TechRepublic.'' 2010-03-24.</ref> As the price of RAM decreased and more RAM was installed in computers, the mitigations provided by ReadyBoost to systems with insufficient memory decreased.