Changes

Los Angeles would again turn away a solid Chicago club under coach [[Dick Motta]]. The series went the full seven games, which showed the Lakers had clearly dropped a couple notches. Game one had been an overtime affair, while LA needed their fourth home game to win Game Seven 95-92. Chicago, like Baltimore and Atlanta, had become the solid second-tier team that could not get past the giants.
 
Milwaukee looked to be that fourth giant as they met the 47-win Golden State Warriors. But the Warriors did not read the script. Nate Thurmond wanted to prove he could defend the league's best center and he surely did, dropping Abdul-Jabbar's scoring by eight points and shooting by 12% in the series. Rick Barry had finally rejoined his NBA team from five years ago also, and Clyde Lee starred as well helping Thurmond to a 4-2 series win that wasn't really very close. Game Six ended 100-86. Milwaukee's Robertson saw a solid series fall short.
 
Meanwhile, Los Angeles was resting, having used three 20-point scorers and Chamberlain's dominance inside to brush off Golden State 4-1. Al Attles' Warriors may still have been celebrating their win over Milwaukee. Game Three was a huge 126-70 Laker win in Oakland. The Warriors won Game Four, but all it did was force the series back to Southern California, where the Lakers clinched in Game Five.