Carboxylate: Difference between revisions

391 bytes removed ,  7 years ago
Undid revision 519946072 by Officer781 (talk) the MO description is exactly the same as the VB description, only different language.
(added MO explanation)
(Undid revision 519946072 by Officer781 (talk) the MO description is exactly the same as the VB description, only different language.)
 
This [[delocalization]] of the electron cloud means that either of the oxygen atoms is less strongly negatively charged; the positively charged proton is therefore less strongly attracted back to the carboxylate group once it has left. In contrast, an alkoxide ion, once formed, would have a strong negative charge on the oxygen atom, which would make it difficult for the proton to escape. Thus, the carboxylate ion is more stable and carboxylic acids have a lower [[pH]] than alcohols: the higher the number of protons in solution, the lower the pH. <ref>{{cite book | author= Fox, Marye Anne; Whitesell, James K. | year = 1997 | title = Organic Chemistry | edition = 2| publisher = Jones and Bartlett Publishers | location = Sudbury, Massachusetts| isbn = 0-7637-0178-5 }}</ref>
 
=== Carboxylates in MO-theory ===
{{main|three-center four-electron bond}}
Later theories of chemical bonding, particularly the [[Molecular orbital theory|theory of Molecular Orbitals]] do away with the twin resonant structures, where electrons are assumed to be attached either to one or to two atoms only. Instead a [[three-center four-electron bond]] explanation is employed.
 
{{clear}}
 
==Examples==