Novgorod Detinets: Difference between revisions

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[[Image:Novgorod Kremlin Map.png|thumb|right|300px|Map of Novgorod Kremlin]]
 
The '''DetinetsNovgorod Kremlin''' ("Young Man's Compound," from the same root as the Russian word ''deti'' = children) is the ancient name for thealso [[KremlinDetinets]] or fortress in [[Novgorod the Great]], which) stands on the left bank of the [[Volkhov River]] about two miles north of where it empties out of [[Lake Ilmen]].<ref>A. I. (Aleksandr Ignat'evich) Semenov, ''Novgoroskii Kreml'' (Novgorod: gazeta “Novgorodskaia Pravda,” 1964).</ref>
==History==
The '''Detinets''' ("Young Man's Compound," from the same root as the Russian word ''deti'' = children) is the ancient name for the [[Kremlin]] or fortress in [[Novgorod the Great]], which stands on the left bank of the [[Volkhov River]] about two miles north of where it empties out of [[Lake Ilmen]].<ref>A. I. (Aleksandr Ignat'evich) Semenov, ''Novgoroskii Kreml'' (Novgorod: gazeta “Novgorodskaia Pravda,” 1964).</ref>
 
==History==
The compound was originally the site of a pagan burial ground upon which the first bishop of Novgorod, [[Ioakim Korsunianin]] built the [[Saint Sophia Cathedral in Novgorod|Cathedral of Holy Wisdom]] upon his arrival in the area in 989 or so. Thus the compound was and remained largely an ecclesiastical site, although many Novgorodian boyars built their houses in the southern part of the Detinets.<ref>S. V. Troianovskii, "O nekotorikh rezul'tatakh raskopok v Novgorodskom kremle v 1992-1996 gg.," ''Novgorod i novgorodskaia zemlia, istoriia i arkheologiia'', No. 12, (1998): 58-70.</ref>