Omaha Public Library: Difference between revisions

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fixed mistake with board of directors. Moving part of branches to own page and combining it with article for dale w. clark
(addition of library board and two links)
(fixed mistake with board of directors. Moving part of branches to own page and combining it with article for dale w. clark)
 
==Governance==
==Governance==
Omaha Public Library is governed by a nine member [[board of directors]] that is appointed by the [[mayor of Omaha]] and confirmed by the [[Omaha City Council]]. Members serve three-year terms. Aside from the main library in [[Downtown Omaha]], the system includes eleven branches throughout the city.
The Omaha Public Library is governed by a nine member [[board of directors]]. These people are appointed by the [[mayor of Omaha]] and confirmed by the Omaha City Council. Terms are for 3 years with the next appointment occurring May 31, 2012 <ref>[http://www.nlc.state.ne.us/Scripts/Libraries/BasicLibraryData.asp?libcode=NE0162 Omaha Public Library] Nebraska Library Commission Library Database </ref>. The Board of Directors meet every third Wednesday of the month at different branches throughout the system. Meetings are open to the public and the agenda and minutes are posted on the Omaha Public Library website <ref>[http://www.omahalibrary.org/about-us/board-of-directors Board of Directors] Omaha Public Library</ref>.
 
==Branches==
See also: [[Omaha Public Library Branches]]
 
{| class="wikitable"
!align="center" colspan="6"|'''Current Omaha Public Library locations'''
|
| [http://www.omahapubliclibrary.org/aboutus/locations/wc.html Link]
|-
|}
 
===Charles B. Washington Branch===
The '''Charles B. Washington Branch''' is a branch library of the Omaha Public Library located at 2868 Ames Avenue in [[North Omaha]].
 
Original library service to North Omaha was a deposit station in a notions store. The branch library was established in 1921 in an old church building at 25th and Ames Avenue. It was called the North Omaha Branch. Within 10 years of the building service to the Omaha Public Library, the building began to deteriorate.
 
The old church building was replaced by a newly build library building in 1938 at 29th and Ames Ave. The first 29th Street location served the community for 30 years before overcrowding made the building obsolete. In 1972 a federal grant allowed the branch to be rebuilt again at the same location. The 1972 location was designed by Dana Larson Roubal & Associates architects.
1986 The North Branch Library was renamed the Charles B. Washington Branch after a longtime civil rights advocate <ref>[http://www.omahapubliclibrary.org/earlyomaha/library/library_branches_9.html "Gateway to the West: Charles B. Washington Branch"] Omaha Public Library. Retrieved 6/25/2008.</ref>
 
In 2006 a major renovation and expansion was completed focused on upgrading the exterior of the building and increased the technology available at the branch. Mayor [[Mike Fahey]], performers from [[Omaha North High School|North High School]] and [[University of Nebraska at Omaha]], and actor/rapper [[Ice-T]] attended.<ref>''[http://72.14.205.104/search?q=cache:aMyrCxwPBykJ:www.omahalibrary.org/foundation/connection/SinglePagesSpring06.pdf+downtown+%22omaha+library%22&hl=en&ct=clnk&cd=4&gl=us&client=firefox-a Connection]'', Omaha Public Library. Retrieved 1/11/08.</ref> A new teen center is unique to Omaha's public library system, along with a large collection of African American materials.<ref>[http://www.nebraskalibraries.org/conference/archives/2006/index.html "2006 Fall Conference"], Nebraska Library Association and Nebraska Educational Media Association. Retrieved 1/11/08.</ref> The library is also home to a new community technology center, along with a new [[sculpture garden|outdoor sculpture reading garden]]. Omaha artist Yanna Ramaeker's two bronze sculptures and a giant birdcage containing bronze birds interpret [[Maya Angelou]]’s poem "[[Caged Bird]]." Ramaeker designed the sculptures and garden to be a peaceful environment for reading and meditation.<ref>[http://www.omahacityweekly.com/article.php?id=1355 "New garden"], ''Omaha City Weekly. Retrieved 1/11/08.</ref><ref>[http://www.omahalibrary.net/events/gallery/wb-sculpture-garden-alt.html "Sculpture Garden/Mirror"], Omaha Public Library. Retrieved 1/12/08.</ref>
 
Since 2002 the Omaha Community [[Kwanzaa]] Group has hosted an annual celebration at the branch.<ref>Nelson, A. [http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_page=1219&u_sid=10219064 "Kwanzaa '07 celebration: Cultivating pride, chang"], ''[[Omaha World Herald]].'' December 28, 2007. Retrieved 1/11/08.</ref> In 2007 it hosted [[StoryCorps]] [[oral history]] gathering exhibit,<ref>[http://www.nebraskaartscouncil.org/index_html?page=content/NEWS/Archives/MJ07storycorps.htm "STORYCORPS AND KIOS-FM PARTNERING TO GIVE VOICE TO YOUR STORIES"], Nebraska Arts Council. Retrieved 1/11/08.</ref> along with a presentation entitled "North Omaha Architectural History," which focused on Omaha architects [[Thomas Kimball]] and [[Cap Wigington]].<ref>(2003) [http://www.nebraskahistory.org/publish/publicat/newsletr/may03.htm Historical Newsletter], Nebraska State Historical Society. Retrieved 1/11/08.</ref>
 
===Elkhorn Public Library===
The Elkhorn Public Library in [[Elkhorn, Nebraska]] first began in 1874; however no record of it exists from 1875 to 1925. On February 15, 1925, Antlers Temple No. 24 Pythian Sisters took on the project for a local library. With books donated by the Omaha Public Library, a small library was opened up at 110 Main Street. In October of the same year, the library moved to the office of a local doctor named Doctor Brown. The library was moved again 4 years later to a room of the Elkhorn Town Hall where it remained until 1966. <ref>Elkhorn Woman’s Club. Elkhorn, Nebraska, 1867-1967 : the first century of progress. Elkhorn, Nebraska: Elkhorn Woman's Club, 1967.</ref>
 
On June 12, 1966, the library was moved to an upstairs room at a new community center at 401 Glenn Street. The library remained at the community center until 1996; however, a move to the lower level of the community center in 1982 nearly doubled the size of the library. In June 1996, the Bess Johnson Elkhorn Public Library opened its doors to the public. The new library building at 100 Reading Road was nearly 6 times larger than the lower level room at the community center.
 
Due to the 2008 annexation of Elkhorn by Omaha, the Bess Johnson Elkhorn Public Library officially became the Bess Johnson Elkhorn Branch of the Omaha Public Library on March 1, 2008
 
===South Omaha Library===
{{main|South Omaha Library}}
The South Omaha Library is a joint venture by the Omaha Public Library and the [[Metropolitan Community College (Omaha)|Metropolitan Community College (MCC)]]. The building at 2808 Q St replaces the OPL's South Branch at 2302 M St as well as MCC's South Campus library. South Omaha Library opened its doors for general business on June 19, 2008
 
===Former Libraries===
The Omaha Public Library draws its roots to the Second Library Association which existed from 1872 to 1877. However, several current Omaha Public Library branches started off as independent libraries. The Benson Village Library, Bess Johnson Elkhorn Library, Millard Library, and the South Omaha Carnegie Library are all predecessors of Omaha Public Library branches.
 
{| class="wikitable"
!align="center" colspan="6"|'''Former Library Buildings & Locations (Omaha Public Library and Predecessors)'''<ref>Ferguson-Cavanaugh, Joanne. [<s>http://www.omahapubliclibrary.org/earlyomaha/library/library.html Gateway to the West</s>]. Retrieved June 25 2008 (Unaccessable February 26 2010) </ref>
|-
! Name (date)
! Location
! Replacement (date)
! Notes
|-
| Benson Branch Library (1923)
| Benson Fire House, [[Benson, Nebraska|Benson]]
| Benson Branch (current)
| Located on the top floor of the fire house
|-
| Benson Village Library (1884)
| Public school, Benson
| Benson Village Library (unknown)
|
|-
| Benson Village Library (unknown)
| Local pharmacy, Benson
| Benson Branch Library (1923)
| Became the 3rd branch with the 1917 annexation of Benson Village
|-
| Elkhorn Public Library (1874)
|
| disbanded (1875?)
| No record of this library exists after 1875, it is believed that the library was disbanded
|-
| Elkhorn Public Library (Feb 1925)
| 110 Main Street, [[Elkhorn, Nebraska|Elkhorn]]
| Elkhorn Public Library (Oct 1925)
|
|-
| Elkhorn Public Library (Oct 1925)
| Dr. Brown's Office, Elkhorn
| Elkhorn Public Library (1929)
|
|-
| Elkhorn Public Library (1929)
| Elkhorn Town Hall
| Elkhorn Public Library (1966)
|
|-
| Elkhorn Public Library (1966)
| 401 Glenn Street, Elkhorn
| Bess Johnson Elkhorn Public Library (1996)
| In 1982 library moved from top floor to bottom floor of community center
|-
| Elmwood Branch Library
|
|
|
|-
| Florence Branch Library (1923)
| North 30th Street, [[Florence, Nebraska|Florence]]
| Florence Branch Library (current)
| Was split briefly to two smaller locations in 1935 but restored after a month due to public outcry
|-
| Kellom Branch
|
| Closed (1992)
|
|-
| Lotis Branch
|
|
| Dates unknown, mentioned in a 1945 promotional pamlet for the Omaha Public Library
|-
| Millard Branch Library (1974)
| Millard Shopping Center, [[Millard, Nebraska|Millard]]
| Millard Branch Library (current)
| This temporary move was one of the few agreements between Omaha and Millard over the annexation
|-
| Millard Library (1952)
| Millard Hall, Millard
| Millard Library (1963)
|
|-
| Millard Library (1963)
| Millard Municipal Building, Millard
| Millard Library (1968)
|
|-
| Millard Library (1968)
| 301 Cedar Street, Millard
| Millard Branch Library (1974)
| Located in a private home, became Millard Branch Library in 1971 with the annexation of Millard
|-
| North Branch Library (1921)
| 25th and Ames Avenue, [[North Omaha]]
| North Branch Library (1938)
| Old church building
|-
| North Branch Library (1938)
| 29th and Ames Avenue, North Omaha
| North Branch Library (1971)
|
|-
| North Branch Library (1971)
| 29th and Ames Avenue, North Omaha
| Charles B. Washington Branch (current)
| In 1986 this facility was renamed Charles B. Washington Branch
|-
| North Deposit Station (unknown date)
| Local [[Notion (accessory)|notions]] store
| North Branch Library (1921)
|
|-
| Omaha Library Association (1857)
| Unknown, [[Downtown Omaha]]
| Disbanded (1860)
| Failed because of lack of funds
|-
| Omaha Public Library (1877)
| 15th and [[Dodge Street]], Downtown Omaha
| Omaha Public Library (several unknown locations until 1894)
| First official Omaha Public Library created with books from the disbanded Second Library Association
|-
| [[Omaha Public Library (building)|Omaha Public Library (1894)]]
| 1823 Harney Street, Downtown Omaha
| [[W. Dale Clark Library]] (current)
| This was the first permanent Omaha Public Library location, and was referred to as "Old Main." The building still stands but is no longer a library.
|-
| The Second Omaha Library Association(1872)
| 14th and Dodge Street, Downtown Omaha
| Omaha Public Library (1877)
| Located on the second floor of the Simpson Carriage Factory
|-
| South Branch (1954)
| 23rd and M Streets, [[South Omaha]]
| South Omaha Library (current)
|
|-
| South Omaha Carnegie Library (1904)
| 23rd and M Streets, South Omaha
| South Branch (1954)
| This facility became the first branch of the Omaha Public Library with the 1915 annexation of South Omaha
|-
|}
[[Image:Fopl logo.JPG|thumb|Friends of the Omaha Public Library]]
'''The Friends of Omaha Public Library (FOPL)''' is a non-profit, volunteer run organization which helps to fund literacy and community outreach programs for Omaha Public Library and the Omaha community. FOPL raises money through membership support and sales of used books. General book sales are held quarterly at the W. Clarke Swanson Branch. The Friends of Omaha Public Library can also be found online on [[AbeBooks]] as the Omaha Library Friends and on [[eBay]] as the Friends of the Omaha Public Library.
 
==Governance==
The Omaha Public Library is governed by a nine member board of directors. These people are appointed by the mayor and confirmed by the Omaha City Council. Terms are for 3 years with the next appointment occurring May 31, 2012 <ref>[http://www.nlc.state.ne.us/Scripts/Libraries/BasicLibraryData.asp?libcode=NE0162 Omaha Public Library] Nebraska Library Commission Library Database </ref>. The Board of Directors meet every third Wednesday of the month at different branches throughout the system. Meetings are open to the public and the agenda and minutes are posted on the Omaha Public Library website <ref>[http://www.omahalibrary.org/about-us/board-of-directors Board of Directors] Omaha Public Library</ref>.
 
==See also==