Somerville Pinkney Tuck

Somerville Pinkney Tuck (May 3, 1891 – April 21, 1967)[1] was an American diplomat.

Somerville Pinkney Tuck Jr.
1st United States Ambassador to Egypt
In office
October 10, 1946 – May 30, 1948
PresidentHarry S. Truman
Preceded byHimself (as Minister)
Succeeded byStanton Griffis
United States Minister to Egypt
In office
June 14, 1944 – October 10, 1946
PresidentFranklin D. Roosevelt
Harry S. Truman
Preceded byAlexander Comstock Kirk
Succeeded byHimself (as Ambassador)
Personal details
Born(1891-05-03)May 3, 1891
New Brighton, New York
DiedApril 21, 1967(1967-04-21) (aged 75)
Paris, France

Early in his career, in the early 1920s Tuck was the American Consul at Vladivostok.[2]

Tuck, during World War II, was the Foreign Service Officer who served as Chargé d'affaires to Vichy France.[3]

After leaving that post, Tuck became the last envoy and first United States Ambassador to Egypt; in the latter role, he served from 1946 to 1948.[1][4] After retiring from government service, he served on the board of directors of the Suez Canal in the 1950s.[5]

Tuck died in Paris in April 1967.[6]

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ a b "Somerville Pinkney Tuck (1891–1967)". Office of the Historian. U.S. Department of State. Retrieved November 26, 2011.
  2. ^ "American Consul leaves Vladivostok". The Boston Globe. May 18, 1923. Retrieved November 26, 2011.
  3. ^ Bauer, Yehuda (1981), American Jewry and the Holocaust: the American Jewish Joint Distribution Committee, 1939–1945, Wayne State University Press, p. 176, ISBN 978-0-8143-1672-6
  4. ^ Louis, William Roger (1986), The British Empire in the Middle East, 1945–1951: Arab Nationalism, the United States, and Postwar Imperialism, Oxford University Press, p. 242, ISBN 978-0-19-822960-5
  5. ^ "The Suez Canal". Life. October 22, 1951. Retrieved November 26, 2011.
  6. ^ "S. PINKNEY TUCK, DIPLOMAT, DEAD; First Envoy to Egypt, 75-- On Board of Suez Canal". The New York Times. 1967-04-23. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved 2019-09-27.
Diplomatic posts
Preceded by
None
U.S. Ambassador to Egypt
1946–1948
Succeeded by
Stanton Griffis