Saru Maru is the archaeological site of an ancient monastic complex and Buddhist caves. The site is located near the village of Pangoraria, Budhani Tehsil, Sehore District, Madhya Pradesh, India.[1][2] The site is about 120 km south of Sanchi.

Saru Maru
Saru Maru
The great stupa of Saru Maru
The great stupa of Saru Maru
Saru Maru is located in India
Saru Maru
Shown within India
Saru Maru is located in Madhya Pradesh
Saru Maru
Saru Maru (Madhya Pradesh)
Coordinates22°43′48″N 77°31′12″E / 22.729949°N 77.519910°E / 22.729949; 77.519910Coordinates: 22°43′48″N 77°31′12″E / 22.729949°N 77.519910°E / 22.729949; 77.519910
TypeBuddhist settlement, stupas and caves
Satellite ofPangoraria

Contents

DescriptionEdit

The site contains a number of stupas as well as natural caves for monks. In the caves many Buddhist graffiti have been found (swastika, triratna, kalasa ...). In the main cave were found two inscriptions of Ashoka: a version of the Minor Rock Edict n°1, one of the Edicts of Ashoka, and another inscription mentioning the visit of Piyadasi (honorific name used by Ashoka in his inscriptions) as Maharahakumara (Prince).[1][2]

 
The commemorative inscription

Piyadasi nama/ rajakumala va/ samvasamane/ imam desam papunitha/ vihara(ya)tay(e)

The king, who (now after consecration) is called "Piyadasi", (once) came to this place for a pleasure tour while still a (ruling) prince, living together with his unwedded consort.

— Commemorative Inscription of the visit of Ashoka, Saru Maru. Translated by Falk.[3]

According to the inscription, it would seem that Ashoka visited this Buddhist monastic complex while he was still a prince, and viceroy of the region of Madhya Pradesh, while his residence was to be at Vidisha.[1] In the Buddhist tradition, Ashoka's wife was called Vidishadevi, who was from Sanchi, and whom he married in Vidisha.

Full commemorative inscriptionEdit

Commemorative inscription of Ashoka from Saru Maru, Madhya Pradesh.
Translation
(English)
Transliteration Transcription
(Brahmi script)
Inscription
(Prakrit in the Brahmi script)

The king, who (now after consecration) is called "Piyadasi", (once) came to this place for a pleasure tour while still a (ruling) prince, living together with his unwedded consort.

— Commemorative Inscription of the visit of Ashoka, Saru Maru. Translated by Falk.[5]

Piyadasi nāma
rajakumala va
samvasamane
imam desam papunitha
vihara(ya)tay(e)

𑀧𑀺𑀬𑀤𑀲𑀺 𑀦𑀸𑀫
𑀭𑀸𑀚𑀓𑀼𑀫𑀮 𑀯
𑀲𑀁𑀯𑀲𑀫𑀦𑁂
𑀇𑀫𑀁 𑀤𑁂𑀲𑀁 𑀧𑀧𑀼𑀦𑀺𑀣
𑀯𑀺𑀳𑀭𑀬𑀢𑀬𑁂

 

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ a b c Gupta, The Origins of Indian Art, p.196
  2. ^ a b Archaeological Survey of India
  3. ^ Allen, Charles (2012). Ashoka: The Search for India's Lost Emperor. Little, Brown Book Group. pp. 154–155. ISBN 978-1-4087-0388-5.
  4. ^ Sircar, D. C. (1979). Asokan studies. Plate XVI.
  5. ^ Allen, Charles (2012). Ashoka: The Search for India's Lost Emperor. Little, Brown Book Group. pp. 154–155. ISBN 9781408703885.

External linksEdit


Edicts of Ashoka
(Ruled 269-232 BCE)
Regnal years
of Ashoka
Type of Edict
(and location of the inscriptions)
Geographical location
Year 8 End of the Kalinga war and conversion to the "Dharma"
Year 10[1] Minor Rock Edicts Related events:
Visit to the Bodhi tree in Bodh Gaya
Construction of the Mahabodhi Temple and Diamond throne in Bodh Gaya
Predication throughout India.
Dissenssions in the Sangha
Third Buddhist Council
In Indian language: Sohgaura inscription
Erection of the Pillars of Ashoka
Kandahar Bilingual Rock Inscription
(in Greek and Aramaic, Kandahar)
Minor Rock Edicts in Aramaic:
Laghman Inscription, Taxila inscription
Year 11 and later Minor Rock Edicts (n°1, n°2 and n°3)
(Panguraria, Maski, Palkigundu and Gavimath, Bahapur/Srinivaspuri, Bairat, Ahraura, Gujarra, Sasaram, Rajula Mandagiri, Yerragudi, Udegolam, Nittur, Brahmagiri, Siddapur, Jatinga-Rameshwara)
Year 12 and later[1] Barabar Caves inscriptions Major Rock Edicts
Minor Pillar Edicts Major Rock Edicts in Greek: Edicts n°12-13 (Kandahar)

Major Rock Edicts in Indian language:
Edicts No.1 ~ No.14
(in Kharoshthi script: Shahbazgarhi, Mansehra Edicts
(in Brahmi script: Kalsi, Girnar, Sopara, Sannati, Yerragudi, Delhi Edicts)
Major Rock Edicts 1-10, 14, Separate Edicts 1&2:
(Dhauli, Jaugada)
Schism Edict, Queen's Edict
(Sarnath Sanchi Allahabad)
Rummindei Edict, Nigali Sagar Edict
Year 26, 27
and later[1]
Major Pillar Edicts
In Indian language:
Major Pillar Edicts No.1 ~ No.7
(Allahabad pillar Delhi pillar Topra Kalan Rampurva Lauria Nandangarh Lauriya-Araraj Amaravati)

Derived inscriptions in Aramaic, on rock:
Kandahar, Edict No.7[2][3] and Pul-i-Darunteh, Edict No.5 or No.7[4]

  1. ^ a b c Yailenko,Les maximes delphiques d'Aï Khanoum et la formation de la doctrine du dhamma d'Asoka, 1990, pp.243.
  2. ^ Inscriptions of Asoka de D.C. Sircar p.30
  3. ^ Handbuch der Orientalistik de Kurt A. Behrendt p.39
  4. ^ Handbuch der Orientalistik de Kurt A. Behrendt p.39