The Sarsuti river, originating in Siwalik Hills and flowing through the palaeochannel of Yamuna, is a tributary of Ghaggar river in of Haryana state of India.[2][3][1] Its course is dotted with archaeological and religious sites dating back to post-Harrapan Mahabharata sites from Vedic period, such as Kapal Mochan, Kurukshetra, Thanesar, Brahma Sarovar, Jyotisar, Bhor Saidan and Pehowa.[1]

Sarsuti River
Sarasvati-ancient-river.jpg
The Sarsuti river is part of the blue line upstream of the Ghaggar river.
Location
CountryIndia
Physical characteristics
Source 
 ⁃ locationRampur Herian (south of Adi Badri) Shivalik Hills, Haryana[1]
Discharge 
 ⁃ locationGhaggar river in Haryana
Basin features
Tributaries 
 ⁃ leftMarkanda river and Dangri

Origin and routeEdit

The Sarsuti is a small ephemeral stream that rises in the Siwalik Hills of south-eastern Himachal Pradesh in India,[4] and flows through Haryana.[5] It is palaeochannel of Yamuna before Yamuna shifted towards east due to plate tectonics of earth's crust.[5] It has also been identified as one of the tributaries of Sarasvati River.

It flows south-east where it is joined by two other streams, the Markanda river and the Dangri, before joining the Ghaggar river near the village of Rasula [near Pehowa].[4]

It is thereafter known as the Ghaggar. Further downstream on the banks of the Ghaggar stands an old derelict fort [at sirsa city] named Sarsuti.[4]

According to Valdiya and Danino, Sarsuti is a corruption of the word Sarasvati, and the 6–8 km wide channel of the Sarsuti–Ghaggar system may have once been the Sarasvati River mentioned in the Rig Veda.[4][6]

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ a b c B.K. Bhadra and J.R. Sharma, Satellite images as scientific tool for Sarasvati Paleochannel and its archaeological affinity in NW India, page 106-110.
  2. ^ AmbalaOnline - Rrvers of Ambala
  3. ^ Chopra, Sanjeev (25 September 2010). "Overflowing Ghaggar, Tangri inundate some villages along Punjab-Haryana border". The Indian Express. Retrieved 9 April 2017.
  4. ^ a b c d Valdiya, K.S. (2002). Saraswati : the river that disappeared. Hyderabad: Orient Longman. pp. 23–27. ISBN 9788173714030. Retrieved 4 May 2015.
  5. ^ a b PALAEOCHANNELS OF NORTH WEST INDIA, Central Ground Water Board, last page of preface.
  6. ^ Danino, Michel (2010). The lost river : on the trail of the Sarasvatī. New Delhi: Penguin Books India. p. 12. ISBN 9780143068648. Retrieved 4 May 2015. (Chapter 1, page 12)

External linksEdit