Sahara Forest Project

The Sahara Forest Project[1][2] aims to provide fresh water, food and renewable energy in hot, arid regions as well as re-vegetating areas of uninhabited desert. The founding team was composed of Seawater Greenhouse Ltd, Exploration Architecture, Max Fordham Consulting Engineers and the Bellona Foundation.

The proposed technology combines saltwater-cooled greenhouses with solar power technologies, either directly using Photovoltaic (PV) or indirectly using concentrated solar power (CSP) and technologies for desert revegetation. It is claimed that these technologies together will create a sustainable and profitable source of energy, food, vegetation and water. The scale of the proposed project is such that very large quantities of seawater would be evaporated. By using locations below sea level, pumping costs would be eliminated. A project in Qatar has been completed, and pilot projects in Jordan and Tunisia have been initiated.[3][4][5][6]

Pilot in QatarEdit

Sahara Forest Project's first pilot facility was built in Qatar and officially opened in December 16th, 2012 by then the Heir Apparent Sheikh Tamim bin Hamad Al Thani.[7][8][9][10] The results were better than expected.[11][12] The results have guided next steps, namely a test and demonstration center providing the first commercial-scale of the full Sahara Forest Project value chain.

Jordan agreementEdit

On 22 June 2014, the Sahara Forest Project signed an agreement with The Royal Norwegian Embassy in Amman for establishing a Sahara Forest Project Launch Station and related activities in Jordan.[13] The Launch Station will be the first step towards a full-scale Sahara Forest Project Centre in Aqaba, Jordan. The Launch Station will contain a saltwater-cooled greenhouse in combination with solar power technologies and facilities for outdoor cultivation and revegetation. The Qatar plant was dismantled in 2016, and is expected to be operational in Jordan in 2017 after being shipped.[14]

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Jha, Alok (2 September 2008) "Seawater greenhouses to bring life to the desert" The Guardian. Accessed 29 December 2011.
  2. ^ Fourth World Conference on the Future of Science "Food and Water for Life" - Venice, September 24-27, 2008 Archived 2009-04-19 at the Wayback Machine
  3. ^ Clery, D. (2011). "Greenhouse-Power Plant Hybrid Set to Make Jordan's Desert Bloom". Science. 331 (6014): 136. doi:10.1126/science.331.6014.136. PMID 21233357.
  4. ^ Dell'Amore, Christine (22 January 2011) “High-Tech Energy "Oasis" to Bloom in the Desert?”, National Geographic daily News. Accessed 29 December 2011.
  5. ^ Rosner, Hilary (7 August 2011) “The Future of Farming: Eight Solutions For a Hungry World”. Popular Science . Accessed 29 December 2011.
  6. ^ Walt, Vivienne (15 January 2009) “Out of Africa: Saharan Solar Energy”. Time. Accessed 29 December 2011.
  7. ^ Gulf Times (December 2012) http://www.gulf-times.com/qatar/178/details/335275/heir-apparent-unveils-sahara-forest-project
  8. ^ Dell'Amore, Christine (22 January 2011) “High-Tech Energy "Oasis" to Bloom in the Desert?”, National Geographic daily News. Accessed 29 December 2011.
  9. ^ Rosner, Hilary (7 August 2011) “The Future of Farming: Eight Solutions For a Hungry World”. Popular Science . Accessed 29 December 2011.
  10. ^ Walt, Vivienne (15 January 2009) “Out of Africa: Saharan Solar Energy”. Time. Accessed 29 December 2011.
  11. ^ Science (7 November 2013)http://news.sciencemag.org/asiapacific/2013/11/desert-farming-experiment-yields-first-results
  12. ^ Landscape ME (January 2014) http://issuu.com/allanronald45/docs/landscape_magazine_january_2014/25?e=7613768/6201013
  13. ^ Norway in Jordan (June 2014) [1]
  14. ^ "Sahara Forest Project". Teknisk Ukeblad. Retrieved 18 October 2016.
  15. ^ Corrugated cardboard swamp cooler by Sundrop Farm
  16. ^ Sundrop Farm's system

External linksEdit