Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Ancona-Osimo

The Archdiocese of Ancona-Osimo (Latin: Archidioecesis Anconitana-Auximana) is a joint ecclesiastical territory and metropolitan see of the Catholic Church in the Marche region of Italy.[1][2]

Archdiocese of Ancona-Osimo

Archidioecesis Anconitana-Auximana
16AnconaSCiriaco.jpg
Cathedral in Ancona
Location
CountryItaly
Ecclesiastical provinceAncona-Osimo
Statistics
Area500 km2 (190 sq mi)
Population
- Total
- Catholics
(as of 2016)
223,923
209,730 (93.7%)
Parishes72
Information
DenominationCatholic Church
RiteRoman Rite
Established3rd Century
CathedralBasilica Cattedrale di S. Ciriaco
Co-cathedralBasilica Concattedrale di S. Leopardo
Secular priests91 (diocesan)
43 (religious Orders)
17 Permanent Deacons
Current leadership
PopeFrancis
ArchbishopAngelo Spina
Emeritus Bishops
Map
Arcidiocesi di Ancona-Osimo.svg
Website
Diocese of Ancona website (in Italian)

It has existed in its present form since 1986, when the Archdiocese of Ancona was united with the historical Diocese of Osimo. Since earliest times, the diocese has been directly subject to the Holy See (Papacy), without intermediate authorities.[3]

The archbishop has his episcopal throne in the Cathedral of Ancona, while the Cathedral of Osimo has the status of a co-cathedral.

In the 17th, 18th, and 19th Centuries, the Archbishop of Ancona was frequently a Cardinal. One former Archbishop, Prospero Lambertini, rose to the Papacy as Pope Benedict XIV.

Contents

HistoryEdit

On 19 October 1422, by virtue of the Bull Ex supernae majestatis, Pope Martin V decreed the union of the diocese of Ancona and the diocese of Numana (Humana, Umana). Except for the title, the diocese of Numana was completely suppressed.[4]

On 14 September 1904, the Consistorial Congregation of the Papal Curia issued a decree, which had been approved by Pope Pius X, elevating the diocese of Ancona-Numantia to the rank of archiepiscopal see, without any suffragans and with the status and geographical definition of the diocese unchanged. The decree also granted the archbishops the use of the pallium and the archiepiscopal cross, but only within the confines of their own diocese. Cardinal Achille Manara was continued as head of the archdiocese.[5]

On 15 August 1972, by the Bull Qui apostolico officio, Pope Paul VI created the new ecclesiastical province of Ancona, and granted its archbishop the status of Metropolitan. The ecclesiastical province was assigned the suffragan dioceses of Jesi (Aesina) and Osimo (Auximana).[6]

On 5 July 1975, having obtained the permission of Pope Paul VI, the Congregation of Bishops of the Papal Curia ordered that the title of the archdiocese should only be the Archdiocese of Ancona. The title of Numana was reserved, to become a titular bishopric.[7]

In a decree of the Second Vatican Council, it was recommended that dioceses be reorganized to take into account modern developments.[8] As part of the project begun on orders from Pope John XXIII, and continued under his successors, to reduce the number of dioceses in Italy and to rationalize their borders in terms of modern population changes and shortages of clergy, the diocese of Ancona was united to the diocese of Osimo by a decree of the Sacred Congregation of Bishops of the Papal Curia, on 30 September 1986. Its name was to be Archidioecesis Anconitana-Auximana. The seat of the diocese was to be in Ancona. The former cathedral in Osimo was to have the honorary title of co-cathedral, and its chapter was to be the Capitulum Concathedralis. There was to be only one episcopal curia, one seminary, one ecclesiastical tribunal; and all the clergy were to be incardinated in the diocese of Ancona-Osimo.[9]

Cathedral and ChapterEdit

The cathedral of Ancona suffered considerable damage in World War I, when the Austrian navy bombarded the port of Ancona in May 1915.[10]

In 816, the Emperor Louis the Pious held a council at Aix, at which it was ordered that Canons and Canonesses live together according to a set of rules (canons, regulae). In the Roman synod of Pope Eugene II of November 826, it was ordered that Canons live together in a cloister next to the church. In 876, the Council of Pavia decreed in Canon X that the bishops should enclose the Canons: uti episcopi in civitatibus suis proximum ecclesiae claustrum instituant, in quo ipsi cum clero secundum canonicam regulam Deo militent, et sacerdotes suos ad hoc constringant, ut ecclesiam non relinquant et alibi habitare praesumant.[11]

The earliest history of the Chapter of S. Cyriaco is without documentation. In 1179, however, Pope Alexander III issued a bull, confirming the Archdeacon and his colleagues in the Chapter all the rights, privileges and property which they possessed. In the bull he mentions their right to offerings made at certain altars in the cathedral, which had been granted by Bishops Transbertus, Marcellinus and Bernardus. The Chapter was therefore in existence by the very end of the 11th century.[12]

Bishop Gerardus fixed the maximum number of Canons in the cathedral Chapter at twelve. He then obtained a Bull from Pope Honorius III in 1224 which confirmed his action.[13] From early times there were three dignities: the Archdeacon, the Archpriest, and the Primicerius.[14]

In 1622, the Chapter of the Cathedral of S. Cyriaco was composed of two dignities and twelve Canons.[15] In 1710, in addition to the twelve Canons, there were four dignities: these included the Primicerius, the Archdeacon, and the Archpriest.[16] In 1746, there were three dignities.[17]

The Collegiate Church of S. Maria della Piazza in Ancona was also served by a Chapter, composed of a Provost and six Canons.[18]

SynodsEdit

A diocesan synod was an irregularly held, but important, meeting of the bishop of a diocese and his clergy. Its purpose was (1) to proclaim generally the various decrees already issued by the bishop; (2) to discuss and ratify measures on which the bishop chose to consult with his clergy; (3) to publish statutes and decrees of the diocesan synod, of the provincial synod, and of the Holy See.[19]

Bishop Luigi Galli (1622–1657) presided over a diocesan synod in Ancona in 1654.[20]A diocesan synod was held by Cardinal Giannicolò Conti (1666–1698) on 4–5 November 1674.[21]

Cardinal Marcello d'Aste (1700–1709) held a diocesan synod in Ancona in 1708; its Constitutions were published in 1738.[22] Cardinal Giovanni Battista Bussi (1710–1726) presided over a diocesan synod in the cathedral at Ancona on 15–18 September 1726.[23] Cardinal Bartolomeo Massei (1731–1745) held a diocesan synod in the cathedral of S. Cyriaco on 26–28 October 1738.[24] Cardinal Giovanni Ottavio Bufalini (1766–1782) held a diocesan synod on 1–3 September 1779.[25]

On 13–15 November 1883, Cardinal Achille Manara held a diocesan synod in the cathedral of Ancona.[26]

Bishops of AnconaEdit

  • Primianus
...
  • Cyriacus ?
...
...
  • Ignotus (attested 496)[28]
...
  • Traso
...
...
...
  • Serenus (attested 598, 603)[31]
...
  • Maurosus (attested 649)[32]
...
  • Joannes (attested 680)[33]
...
  • Senator (attested 743)[34]
...
  • Tigrinus (attested 826)[35]
...
  • Leopardus (attested 869)[36]
  • Paulus (attested 873, 878, 880)[37]
...
  • Bolongerius (Benolegerius) (attested 887)[38]
...
  • Erfermarius (attested 967, 968)[39]
...
  • Traso (attested 996)[40]
  • Stephanus (c. 1020)[41]
...
  • Grimaldus (attested 1051)[42]
  • Gerardus (attested 1068)[43]
  • Transbertus[44]
  • Marcellinus
  • Bernardus (attested 1128)[45]
  • Anonymus (attested 1146)
  • Lambertus (menzionato nel 1150 or 1158)[46]
  • Thomas ? (c. 1172)[47]
  • Gentile (attested 1179)[48]
  • Rodolfus, O.S.B.Camald.
  • Beroaldus (attested 1186–1192)
...
  • Gerardus (attested 1204–1228)
...
  • Persevallus (c. 1239–c. 1242)[49]
  • Joannes Bonus (1244– ? )[50]
  • Petrus Capocci[51]
  • Petrus Romanucci (1284 or earlier – 1286)[52]
  • Berardus de Podio (1286–1296)[53]
  • Pandulfus
  • Nicolaus
  • Thomas
  • Nicolaus Rinonis
  • Augustinus de Podio
  • Lanfrancus Salvetti, O.Min.[54]
  • Joannes Tedeschi, O.E.S.A. (1349–1381)[55]
  • Bartholomaeus de Uliariis, O.S.B. (1381–1385)[56]
  • Guglielmo della Vigna, O.S.B. (1386–1405)[57]
  • Carolus de Actis de Saxoferrato, O.S.B. (1405–1406)[58]
  • Lorenzo de Ricci (1406–1410)[59]
  • Simone Vigilanti , O.E.S.A. (1410–1412)[60]
  • Pietro Liberotti (1412–1419)[61]
  • Astorgio Agnesi (1419–1436)[62]

Bishops of Ancona e NumanaEdit

United: 19 October 1422 with the Diocese of Numana

Cardinal Alessandro Farnese (1585) Administrator[71]
Sede vacante (1657–1666)
Sede vacante (1800–1816)[83]
  • Card. Nicola Riganti (1816–1822)[84]
  • Card. Giovanni Francesco Falzacappa (1823–1824 Resigned)[85]
  • Card. Cesare Nembrini Pironi Gonzaga (1824–1837)[86]
  • Card. Antonio Maria Cadolini, B. (12 Feb 1838 – 1 Aug 1851 Died)
  • Card. Antonio Benedetto Antonucci (5 Sep 1851 – 29 Jan 1879 Died)[87]
  • Card. Achille Manara (1879–1906 Died)[88]

Archbishops of Ancona e NumanaEdit

Title granted: 14 September 1904
Name Changed: 5 July 1975 to: Anconitana-Numanensis

  • Giovanni Battista Ricci (21 Jul 1906 – 10 Nov 1929 Died)
  • Mario Giardini, B. (1931–1940 Resigned)[89]
  • Marco Giovanni Della Pietra, O.F.M. (25 Mar 1940 – 13 Jan 1945 Died)
  • Egidio Bignamini (18 Nov 1945 – 21 Dec 1966 Died)
  • Felicissimo Stefano Tinivella, O.F.M. (22 Feb 1967 – 6 Jul 1968 Resigned)
  • Carlo Maccari (5 Aug 1968 – 1 Jul 1989 Retired)

Archbishops of Ancona-OsimoEdit

 
Co-cathedral in Osimo

United: 30 September 1986 with the Diocese of Osimo
Metropolitan See

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ "Archdiocese of Ancona-Osimo" Catholic-Hierarchy.org. David M. Cheney. Retrieved February 29, 2016.[self-published source]
  2. ^ "Metropolitan Archdiocese of Ancona–Osimo" GCatholic.org. Gabriel Chow. Retrieved February 29, 2016.[self-published source]
  3. ^ Kehr, p. 195.
  4. ^ Cappelletti, VII, pp. 109-112, quoting the Bull in full. The bull uses the phrase, incorporatio, annexio, et unio.
  5. ^ Acta Sanctae Sedis Volumen XXXVII (Roma 1904–05), pp. 195-200.
  6. ^ Acta Apostolicae Sedis An. et Vol. LXIV (Città del Vaticano: Typis Polyglottis Vaticanis 1972), pp. 664-665.
  7. ^ Acta Apostolicae Sedis An. et Vol. LXVII (Città del Vaticano: Typis Polyglottis Vaticanis 1975), p. 557: Quapropter Summus Pontifex Paulus, Divina Providentia Pp. VI, in Audientia diei 5 iulii 1975, referente infrascripto Cardinale sacrae Congregationis pro Episcopis Praefecto, oblatis precibus benigne annuendum censuit simulque statuit, ut titulus praefatae Ecclesiae Numanensis seu Humanatensis, ne omnino periret, in Indice Sedium Titularium insereretur atque Episcopis titularibus nuncupatis conferretur.
  8. ^ Directoriae normae clare a Concilio impertitae de dioecesium recognitione; indicia atque elementa apta ad actionem pastoralem aestimandam ab episcopis suppeditata quibus plurium dioecesium regimen commissum est.
  9. ^ Acta Apostolicae Sedis An. et Vol. LXXIX (Città del Vaticano: Typis Polyglottis Vaticanis 1987), pp. 642-645.
  10. ^ Rodolfo Ragnini (1920). Il duomo di ancona dopo il bombardamento del 1915: cenni storici e descrittivi (in Italian). Osimo: Officina Tipografica G. Scarponi.
  11. ^ Lupi, Mario (1784). Josephus Ronchetti (ed.). Codex diplomaticus civitatis, et ecclesiæ Bergomatis (in Latin). Volumen primum. Bergamo: Vincenzo Antoine. pp. 1064–1065. 'Bishops are to create a cloister next to their church, in which they serve God along with their clergy according to the rule of canons, and they should compel their priests not to leave the church and presume to live elsewhere.'
  12. ^ Peruzzi, p. 101, 151. The text in which the names of Bishops Transbertus, Marcellinus, and Bernardus occurs was published by P. Kehr, in Nachrichten von der Königlichen Gesellschaft der Wissenschafter zu Göttingen, philologisch-historische Klasse (Berlin: Weidmann 1909), pp. 470-472.
  13. ^ Ughelli, p. 334. Cappelletti, p. 58. However, Peruzzi (p. 152) gives the title of the Bull, Ecclesiarum utilitati, and provides the date of 12 July 1216; but Honorius III had not yet been elected pope on that date. The full text, but only with the date of anno octavo (AD 1224), is given by Giuliano Saracini (1675). Notitie historiche della città d'Ancona (in Italian and Latin). Roma: Tinassi. p. 193. The date of Kalendas julii, pontificatus anno octavo (1 July 1224) is given by César Auguste Horoy, ed. (1880). Honorii III opera omnia. Medii Aevi Bibliotheca Patristica (in Latin). Tomus IV. Paris: Bibliotheque ecclesiastique. pp. 681, no. 249.
  14. ^ Peruzzi, p. 153.
  15. ^ Gauchat, Hierarchia catholica IV, p. 82, note 1.
  16. ^ Ritzler-Sefrin, V, p. 83 note 1.
  17. ^ Ritzler-Sefrin, VI, p. 82 note 1.
  18. ^ Ughelli, p. 326.
  19. ^ Benedictus XIV (1842). "Lib. I. caput secundum. De Synodi Dioecesanae utilitate". Benedicti XIV ... De Synodo dioecesana libri tredecim (in Latin). Tomus primus. Mechlin: Hanicq. pp. 42–49.
  20. ^ Synodus Anconitana a Luigi Gallo episcopo habita. Ancona: Salvioni l654. Galli held a total of four diocesan synods, according to Cappelletti, p. 124.
  21. ^ Conti, Giannicolò (1675). Anconitana synodus ab Eminentiss. et Reverendiss. Domino D. Ioanne Nicolao ... Cardinali de Comitibvs, Anconitano Episcopo ... habita die 4. & 5. Novembris M. DC. LXXIV (in Latin). Ancona: ex Typographia Camerali. Cappelletti, p. 124.
  22. ^ Massei, Bartolomeo (1738). Synodus Anconitana habita 1708 confirmata et aucta a Bartholomaes Massaei in sua Synodo celebrata diebus 26.27.28. Octobris anno 1738 (in Latin). Ancona: Nicolaus Bellelli.
  23. ^ Bussi, Giovanni Battista (1727). Synodus Anconitana celebrata diebus 15. 16. 17. et 18. Septembris anno 1726 (in Latin). Rome: Antonius de Rubeis (Rossi).
  24. ^ Massei, Bartolomeo (1738). Synodus Anconitana habita 1708 confirmata et aucta a Bartholomaes Massaei in sua Synodo celebrata diebus 26.27.28. Octobris anno 1738 (in Latin). Ancona: Nicolaus Bellelli.
  25. ^ Bufalini, Giovanni Ottavio (1779). Synodus dioecesana ab eccellentissimo, & reverendissimo domino Johanne Octavio ... Bufalini (in Latin). Romae: typis Josephi, et Aloysii Lazzarini.
  26. ^ Synodus dioecesana ab Illustrissimo ac Reverendissimo domino Achille Manara Episcopo Anconitano et Humanatensi celebrata, diebus XIII, XIV et XV novembris MDCGCLXXXIII in cathedrali Ecclesia. Anconae, 1884, typ. G. Cherubini.
  27. ^ Lanzoni, p. 385, notes that the second edition of Ughelli leaves his name out. Peruzzi, p. 92, and Gams, p. 664, however, keep the name. Marcus is just a name, without documentary support.
  28. ^ Kehr, p. 195, no. 1.
  29. ^ Marcellinus: Lanzoni, p. 385, no. 2.
  30. ^ Thomas is known only from a brief mention in a miracle sequence in the "Acts of Saint Marcellinus". Lanzoni, p. 385.
  31. ^ Pope Gregory I wrote to Bishop Serenus in November 598, ordering him to intervene in a financial problem involving Serenus, a deacon of the Church of Ancona. In December 1603, the Church of Ancona was in the hands of an Apostolic Visitor, Bishop Serenus having died; Arminius, the Visitor, and Archbishop John of Rimini, are instructed to investigate the careers of two candidates for the office of Bishop of Ancona: the Archdeacon Florentinus, Florentinus a deacon, and Rusticus a deacon. Peruzzi, p. 93. Kehr, p. 196, nos. 2-4.
  32. ^ Bishop Maurosus was present at the Lateran Synod of Pope Martin I in October 649. J. D. Mansi (ed.), Sacrorum Conciloiorum nova et amplissima collectio, editio novissima, Tomus X (Florence: A. Zatta 1764),p. 866. Peruzzi, p. 94. Cappelletti, p. 29
  33. ^ Bishop Joannes was present at the Roman Synod of Pope Agatho on 27 March 680. J.-P. Migne (ed.), Patrologiae Latinae Tomus LXXXVII (Paris 1863), p. 1244. Peruzzi, p. 95.
  34. ^ Bishop Senator was present at the Roman Synod of Pope Zacharias in 743. J. D. Mansi (ed.), Sacrorum Conciloiorum nova et amplissima collectio, editio novissima, Tomus XII (Florence: A. Zatta 1766),p. 384c. Peruzzi, p. 95.
  35. ^ Bishop Tigrinus was present at the Roman Synod of Pope Eugenius II on 15 November 826. J. D. Mansi (ed.), Sacrorum Conciloiorum nova et amplissima collectio, editio novissima, Tomus XIV (Venice: A. Zatta 1769), p. 1000. Philippus Jaffé and S. Lowenfeld, Regesta pontificum Romanorum Vol. I, second ed. (Leipzig: Veit 1885), p. 321. Peruzzi, pp. 95-96.
  36. ^ According to Peruzzi (p. 96) and Ughelli (I, p. 330), Leopardus was instituted by Pope Nicholas I (858–867). In 866, according to Ughelli, he was sent to spread the gospel in Bulgaria. In 869, Pope Hadrian II wrote to King Michael of the Bulgarians, mentioning his legates Leopardus of Ancona and Dominicus of Treviso. Philippus Jaffé and S. Lowenfeld, p. 372, no. 2925.
  37. ^ Bishop Paul had been a papal legate in Germany and Pannonia in 873–874, and carried papal letters for Bishop Methodius, forbidding the use of Sclavonic in the Mass. Philippus Jaffé and S. Lowenfeld, pp. 379-380, nos. 2976-2978. He was papal ambassador to Constantinople during the Photian schism, but on his return, in August 880, he was deposed by Pope John VIII. Peruzzi, p. 97. Cappelletti, pp. 32-33. Joseph Hergenröther (1867). Photius, Patriarch von Constantinopel (in German (Fraktur)). Vol. II. Regensburg: Manz. pp. 288, 298, 313, 512, 573, 618.CS1 maint: Unrecognized language (link)
  38. ^ is attested by a document published by L. Muratori, but the document, a donation to a monastery by Bishop Teodosio (his name was really Teodicio) of Fermo in the presence of Charles the Bald, has been denounced as a forgery. Peruzzi, pp. 97-98. Cappelletti, p. 33.
  39. ^ Erfermarius was present at the synod of Ravenna, held by Pope John XIII on 25 April 967. He also participated in the Roman synod of John XIII on 2 January 968. J. D. Mansi (ed.), Sacrorum Conciliorum nova et amplissima collectio, editio novissima, Tomus XVIII (Venice: A. Zatta 1773), p. 499. Schwartz, p. 240.
  40. ^ Bishop Traso was present at a meeting held in May 996 in Ravenna by Emperor Otto III. Schwartz, p. 240.
  41. ^ Stefano: Peruzzi, p. 99.
  42. ^ Grimaldus: Peruzzi, p. 100. Gams p. 665. Schwartz, p. 241.
  43. ^ Bishop Gerardus subscribed a decree of Pope Alexander II in 1068. Peruzzi, p. 100.Gams p. 665. Schwartz, p. 241.
  44. ^ Peruzzi, p. 101, 151. The text in which the names of Bishops Transbertus, Marcellinus, and Bernardus occurs was published by P. Kehr, in Nachrichten von der Königlichen Gesellschaft der Wissenschafter zu Göttingen, philologisch-historische Klasse (Berlin: Weidmann 1909), pp. 470-472.
  45. ^ Bernardus: Peruzzi, p. 101. Schwartz, p. 241.
  46. ^ Lambertus: Peruzzi, pp. 102-103.
  47. ^ Thomas: Gams, p. 665 column 1.
  48. ^ Bishop Gentile attended the Third Lateran Council, held by Pope Alexander III in March 1179. Peruzzi, p. 103.
  49. ^ Pope Gregory IX, in 1239, confirmed Bishop Persevallus' decision to fix the number of Canons in the Cathedral Chapter at twelve. Cappelletti, VII, p. 59. Eubel, Hierarchia catholica I, p. 87.
  50. ^ Giovanni was a citizen of Ancona and a Canon in the Cathedral Chapter. He was elected by the Chapter and confirmed by Pope Innocent IV in a letter of 8 January 1245. His diocese was in a bad state, being constantly harassed by the men of Osimo. who were partisans of the Emperor Frederick II. On account of this, he was released in 1246 from his obligation to make an ad limina visit. In 1256, according to Ughelli (Italia sacra I, p. 335), Bishop Giovanni served in the territory of Bari as Vicar General of Cardinal Ottavio Ubaldini when he was papal Legate in the Kingdom of Naples. Cappelletti, VII, p. 59-60. Eubel, Hierarchia catholica I, p. 87.
  51. ^ Scholars are not agreed as to whether Giovanni Bono was followed by one Petrus or by two. Cappelletti, pp. 60-61. Ughelli, I, p. 335, refers to a letter of Honorius IV of 5 July 1285, in which he orders Petrus Capocci, Bishop of Ancona, to protect a monastery's property (citing an original in a Vatican register, folio 123, letter 6; but letter 6 is a letter to Cardinal Gerardo Bishop of Sabina on another topic entirely: see Prou, no. 473). In Marcel Prou, Les registres d'Honorius IV (Paris: Ernest Thorin 1888), p. 338, no. 474 (which is folio 123, letter 7), Prou's summary gives the date as 4 July, and the name of the bishop of Ancona is given only as "P.", without surname or cognomen. The superscription address is: Venerabili fratri P., episcopo Anconitano.
  52. ^ Petrus Romanucci, Bishop of Ancona, was present in the castle of Palumbaria as a witness to a document of Pope Urban IV on 10 May 1284 (The date, to say the least, is wrong, since Honorius IV was not elected pope until 2 April 1285). He was transferred to the diocese of Viterbo on 24 August 1286. He died in 1303. Eubel, I, p. 87, 532. Marcel Prou, Les registres d'Honorius IV (Paris: Ernest Thorin 1888), p. 636.
  53. ^ Berardus was a papal chaplain. He was appointed on 27 August 1286 by Pope Honorius IV. He was transferred to the diocese of Reate (Rieti) on 4 February 1296 by Pope Boniface VIII. Eubel, Hierarchia catholica I, pp. 87, 416.
  54. ^ Lanfranc was transferred to the diocese of Bergamo by Pope Clement VI.
  55. ^ Joannes was appointed Bishop of Ancona by Pope Clement VI on 23 October 1349. He died in 1381. Gams, p. 665. Eubel, I, p. 88.
  56. ^ Bartholomaeus was transferred to the diocese of Florence by Pope Urban VI on 9 December 1385. Eubel, I, pp. 88, 250.
  57. ^ Guilelmus was appointed by Urban VI on 6 February 1386. He was transferred to the diocese of Todi on 12 June 1405 by Pope Innocent VII. He died on 28 October 1407. Eubel, I, pp. 88, 502.
  58. ^ Carlo had been a monk of S. Giorgio in Venice, and a papal chamberlain. He was apointed Bishop of Ancona by Pope Innocent VII on 12 June 1405. He died in 1406. Eubel, I, p. 88.
  59. ^ Lorenzo was a Canon of the Cathedral of Florence. He was appointed Bishop of Ancona on 26 May 1406 by Innocent VII. He was removed from office by Gregory XII as a supporter of the Council of Pisa and Pope Alexander V. Gregory XII had been deposed for schism, heresy, and perjury in 1409. Lorenzo was transferred to the diocese of Sinigaglia by John XXIII. Peruzzi, pp. 111-112. Eubel, I, pp. 88, 447.
  60. ^ Simone was a patrician of Ancona, and was the Vicar General of the Order of Augustine Hermits. He was appointed by Gregory XII on 5 April 1410. Simone was transferred to the diocese of Sinigaglia on 6 March 1419 by Pope Martin V. Peruzzi, p. 112. Eubel, I, pp. 88, 447.
  61. ^ Pietro was appointed by John XXIII to replace Simone Vigilanti on 19 December 1412. He was transferred to the diocese of Ascoli Piceno on 11 September 1419 by Martin V. Peruzzi, p. 112. Eubel, I, p. 88, 111.
  62. ^ Astorgio was a native of Naples. In 1422 he became Bishop of Ancona and Bishop of Numana. He was transferred to the diocese of Benevento on 8 February 1436. Peruzzi, p. 113. Eubel, I, p. 88; II, pp. 87, 104.
  63. ^ Giovanni Caffarelli was a Roman, a doctor of Canon Law, and a Canon of the Basilica of S. Maria Maggiore in Rome. He was appointed Bishop of Forlì by Pope Martin V on 28 April 1427. He was transferred to the diocese of Ancona by Pope Eugene IV on 18 Februart 1437. He died in 1460. Peruzzi, pp. 113-114: Il Caffarelli però dalla santa Sede, per la sua dottrina e per la sua prudenza, occupato sempre ne' più ardui affari della chiesa universale, non potè fare in Ancona nè assidua nè lunga residenza. (He was not a residentiary bishop) Eubel, I, pp. 253; II, p. 87.
  64. ^ Agapitus Rustici-Cenci was a Roman, and a Canon of the Vatican Basilica. He held the degree of Doctor in utroque iure. He held the post of Referendary, and then Auditor (judge) of the Roman Rota. He was appointed Bishop of Ancona by Pope Pius II on 16 April 1460, and transferred to the diocese of Camerino on 22 August 1463. He died in 1464. Peruzzi, p. 114. Eubel, II, pp. 87 with note 2; 116.
  65. ^ Fatati was a native of Ancona, of the Counts Fatati. and a papal chaplain. On 5 November 1430 he was appointed a Canon in the Cathedral Chapter of Ancona, and he rose to be Archpriest of the cathedral. In 1444 he was named Vicar Apostolic in the diocese of Siena following the death of Bishop Cristoforo de S. Marcello. He was papal commissary in Lucca and in Piombino in 1446, and Treasurer General of the Marches in 1449. He was appointed Bishop of Teramo by Pope Pius II on 6 November 1450. In 1455 he was appointed Governor General of the Marches. On 3 November 1463 he became Bishop of Ancona. In 1467, he was Treasurer in Bologna (Peruzzi, p. 117, note). He created six Canons in the Cathedral Chapter, raising the total number to twenty, and instituted the dignity of Provost. He died on 9 January 1484. Peruzzi, pp. 114-115. Eubel, II, pp. 87, 90.
  66. ^ Benincasa was an aristocrat of Ancona, a member of the family of the Marchesi Benincasa. He was a Canon of the Vatican Basilica, and an Abbreviator of Apostolic Letters. He was appointed Bishop of Ancona by Pope Clement VIII on 5 October 1484. He died in 1502. Peruzzi, pp. 116-118. Eubel, II, p. 87.
  67. ^ Sacca was born in Sirolo, a rural territory in the diocese of Ancona. He was Provost of the Collegiate Church of S. Maria del Popolo e S. Rocco, and Abbot Commendatory of the abandoned Benedictine abbey of S. Giovanni in Pennochiara. He was appointed papal Datary by Pope Innocent VIII. He was named Archbishop of Ragusa (Dubrovnik) on 29 August 1490. On 1 January 1500, he was installed as Regent of the Apostolic Chancery and Vice-chancellor (Joannes Burchard, Diarium, ed. L. Thuasne, Vol. III, p. 4). He was named Administrator of the diocese of Ancona on 15 July 1502. In August 1503, Burchard (III, p. 242) mentions that Giovanni Sacca was Governor of the City of Rome, in which capacity he took part in the funeral of Pope Alexander VI on 22 August 1503 (Burchard, III, p. 447). He took part in the two conclaves of 1503. and was an assistant at the throne at the coronation of Pope Julius II (Burchard, III, p. 306). He died in Rome in 1505. Peruzzi, p. 118. G. Moroni (ed.), Dizionario di erudizione storico-ecclesiastica, Vol. XIX (Venice: Tip. Emiliana 1843), p. 131. Eubel, II, pp. 87. 220; III, p. 281.
  68. ^ Of a family originally from Arezzo, Pietro Accolti was born in Florence in 1455, the son of Benedetto Accolti the historian, and nephew of Francesco Accolti, the jurist. Pietro was Doctor in Laws and then professor of law at the University of Pisa. He went to Rome, and was serving as an Auditor of the Rota when named Bishop of Ancona on 4 April 1505. Accolti was named a cardinal by Pope Julius II, in a Consistory held at Ravenna on 10 March 1511. At the time he was Papal Vicar of the City of Rome, and Scriptor Apostolicarum Litterarum. He resigned the diocese of Ancona on 5 April 1514, in favor of nephew Francesco Accolti, but since Francesco was only sixteen years old, Cardinal Pietro continued in office as Administrator until 1523. He died in Rome on 11 December 1532. Lorenzo Cardella (1793). Memorie storiche de'cardinali della santa Romana chiesa (in Italian). Volume IV. Roma: Pagliarini. pp. 350–352. The Biographical Dictionary of the Society for the Diffusion of Useful Knowledge. Volume I. London: Longman, Brown, Green, and Longmans. 1842. pp. 225–226. Eubel, II, pp. 12 no.21; 87, with notes 3, 4, 5.
  69. ^ A native of Bologna, Matteo Giovanni Lucchi was appointed Archbishop of Ancona by Pope Julius III on 23 May 1550. He was transferred to the diocese of Tropea (Kingdom of Naples) on 6 February 1556 by Pope Paul IV. He died in Rome on 22 June 1558. Ughelli, p. 341 (who calls him Joannes Matthaeus Luchius). Peruzzi, p. 119. Cappelletti, p. 121. Eubel, III, p. 108; 320 (where the name is given as Giovanni Matteo Lucchi).
  70. ^ Vincenzo Lucchi was the brother of Matteo Lucchi, his predecessor. Peruzzi, p. 119. Cappelletti, p. 121. Eubel, III, p. 108.
  71. ^ Cardinal Farnese was appointed Apostolic Administrator on 24 February 1555, and served until 1 July 1585; he resigned upon the appointment of a successor to Bishop Lucchi. Peruzzi, p. 120, does not recognize him as an archbishop. Eubel, III, p. 108.
  72. ^ Conti was a Roman, son of Troquato, Duke of Poli. He held the degree of Doctor in utroque iure from Perugia. He was appointed Archbishop of Ancona on 1 July 1585 by Pope Sixtus V. He was appointed governor of Perugia in 1594. From 1599 to 1604, he was Vice-Legate in Avignon. He was named a cardinal by Pope Clement VIII on 9 June 1604, and assigned the titular church of San Crisogono. He died in Rome of a stroke on 3 December 1615. Peruzzi, p. 120. Eubel, III, pp. 7 no. 40; 108.
  73. ^ A native of Osimo, Galli (Joannes Aloysius Galli) had been a Referenday of the Tribunal of the Two Signatures. He served as Regent of the Apostolic Chancery, delegating for Cardinal Alessandro Montalto. He was appointed Bishop of Ancona in the Consistory of 2 May 1622 by Pope Gregory XV. In 1627 he was appointed Governor of the terra Tileolarum in Piedmont. He restored the cathedral, increased the number of students in the diocesan seminary, conducted five pastoral visits of the parishes in his diocese, and held four diocesan synods. He died on 22 August 1657. Cappelletti, pp. 123-124. Peruzzi, p. 120. Gauchat, Hierarchia catholica IV, p. 82 with note 3.
  74. ^ Conti was the nephew of Cardinal Carlo Conti. He died in Ancona on 20 January 1698. Cappelletti, pp. 124. Peruzzi, pp. 120-121. Ritzler-Sefrin, Hierarchia catholica V, p. 83 note 2.
  75. ^ Born in Aversa in 1657, D'Aste held the degree of Doctor in utroque iure from the Sapienza in Rome. He was made a Referendary of the Tribune of the Two Signatures, and Auditor of the Pope. He was a Canon of the Vatican Basilica and consultor of the Holy Office (Inquisition). He was titular Archbishop of Athens (1691–1700), and President of Urbino (1698–1700). He was named a cardinal by Pope Innocent XII on 29 November 1699. On 3 February 1700 he was appointed Archbishop of Ancona, and on 10 May was named Vice-Legate of Urbino. He died in Bologna, in the house of the Dominicans, on 11 June 1709. Peruzzi, pp. 121-122. Ritzler-Sefrin, V, pp. 21 no. 23, with notes 12 and 13; 83; 103 with note 3.
  76. ^ Bussi was born in Viterbo in 1656, and held the degree of Doctor in utroque iure (Sapienza, 1696). He was a Canon of the Vatican Basilica. He had been Archbishop of Tarsus (1706–1710) and papal Nuncio in Cologne. He was transferred to the diocese of Ancona on 19 February 1710 by Pope Clement XI (Albani). On 18 May 1712, he was named a cardinal in pectore (secretly), which was publicly disclosed on 26 September; on 30 January 1713 he was given the red galero and assigned the titular church of S. Maria in Aracoeli. He held a diocesan synod in September 1726. He was appointed Prefect of the Holy House of Loreto. He died on 23 December 1726. Peruzzi, pp. 123-125. Ritzler-Sefrin, V, pp. 28 no. 39 with notes 19 and 20; 83 with note 4; 370 with note 4.
  77. ^ Lambertini was appointed Archbishop of Bologna on 30 April 1731.
  78. ^ Massei was born in Montepulciano in 1663. He held the degree of Doctor in utroque iure (Pisa 1683). He was appointed Referendary of the Tribunal of the Two Signatures in 1717. He was named titular Archbishop of Athens and papal Nuncio to the King of France (1721–1730). He was named a cardinal by Pope Clement XII on 2 October 1730 while he was still in France. He received the red galero on 18 December 1730, and was assigned the titular church of Sant'Agostino on 12 January 1731. He was appointed Archbishop of Ancona on 21 May 1731. He died in Ancona on 20 November 1745. Peruzzi, pp. 126-130. Ritzler-Sefrin, Hierarchia catholica V, p. 103 with note 8; VI, pp. 5 no. 3; 82 with note 2.
  79. ^ Born in Montesanto (diocese of Fermo) in 1692, Manciforte held the degree of Doctor in utroque iure (Macerata 1738). He was appointed a Protonotary Apostolic (1734) and was named a Councilor of the Holy Office (Inquisition) in Ancona in 1737. He was named Bishop of Senigallia on 28 February 1742, and was consecrated a bishop in Rome by Pope Benedict XIV, a former bishop of Ancona. He was transferred to Ancona from the diocese of Senigallia (1742–1746) on 17 January 1746. He died on 19 December 1762. Peruzzi, pp. 130-131. Ritzler-Sefrin, Hierarchia catholica VI, pp. 82 with note 3; 375 with note 3.
  80. ^ A native of Florence, Acciaioli had been papal Nuncio in Switzerland (1744–1754), for which purpose he had been appointed Bishop of Petra (Arabia) in 1743; he was consecrated a bishop by Pope Benedict XIV on 21 December. He was then Nuncio to the King of Portugal (1754–1763). He was appointed a cardinal by Pope Clement XIII in the Consistory of 24 September 1759, and given the red galero on 12 March 1761. On 6 April 1761 he was assigned the titular church of S. Maria degli Angeli. On 24 January 1763 he was appointed Archbishop of Ancona. His family had their own palazzo in Ancona, where he chose to live instead of in the Episcopal Palace. He died in Ancona on 24 July 1766. Peruzzi, pp. 131-132. Ritzler-Sefrin VI, pp. 21 no. 8 with notes 21 and 22; 82 with note 4; 334 with note 3.
  81. ^ Bufalini was born in Città di Castello in 1709. He held the degree of Doctor in utroque iure (Macerata 1740). He held civil posts in the Papal States: Governor of Benevento (1741), and Loreto (1743). He was appointed Referendary of the Tribunal of the Two Signatures, and Cleric of the Apostolic Camera (Treasury). He became Preceptor of the Ospedale di Santo Spirito in Sassia. He had been titular Archbishop of Chalcedon, and was sent as Nuncio to Switzerland (1754). He became Prefect of the Apostolic Palace in 1759. On 21 July 1766 he was named a cardinal by Pope Clement XIII, and was assigned the titular church of S. Maria degli Angeli. He was appointed Bishop of Ancona on 1 December 1766 by Pope Clement XIII. He died on 3 August 1782 in the episcopal villa at Montesicuro, near Ancona. Mario Natalucci, "Il Cardinal Bufalini vescovo e administratore attraverso l'Archivio capitolare di Ancona," in: Quaderni storici delle Marche Vol. 2, No. 5 (2) (maggio 1967), pp. 353-368. (in Italian) Giuseppe Pignatelli, "Bufalini, Giovanni Ottavio," in: Dizionario Biografico degli Italiani Volume 14 (1972). (in Italian) Ritzler-Sefrin VI, pp. 23 no. 38; 161 with note 4.
  82. ^ Ranuzzi was titular Archbishop of Tyre (Phoenicia, Syria) (1775–1785). Ritzler-Sefrin, VI, p. 82 note 5; 424 note 6.
  83. ^ An Apostolic Administrator, Archbishop Francesco Xaverio Passari, the titular Archbishop of Larissa (Thessaly), was appointed on 21 November 1800. He was able to reopen the seminary. He died on 4 June 1808. The episcopal throne was vacant for an additional eight years, during which time Pope Pius VII was a prisoner of Napoleon Bonaparte in France. Cappelletti, pp. 168-169, 171. Ritzler-Sefrin, VI, p. 82 note 6.
  84. ^ A native of Molfetta and the nephew of another Nicola Riganti who was the author of a commentary on the rules of the Apostolic Camera, Riganti held the degree of Doctor in utroque iure, and was a Protonotary Apostolic. He served in various offices in the Roman Curia, in particular as a judge in the Apostolic Camera (Finance Ministry). He was secretary of the Congregation of the Consulta, the supreme court in civil and criminal matters for subjects of the Papal States. At the age of 72, he was named a cardinal and Bishop of Ancona on the same day, 8 March 1816. He was consecrated a bishop on 21 April by Pope Pius VII. Having suffered a stroke in 1819, he was taken to Rome, while his duties in Ancona were taken over by the titular Bishop of Lydda, Msgr. Francesco de'Conti Pichi. Riganti died in Rome on 31 August 1822, and was buried in S. Maria sopra Minerva. Gaetano Moroni (1852). Dizionario di erudizione storico-ecclesiastica (in Italian). Vol. LVII: Ref-Rin. Venezia: Tipografia Emiliana. pp. 243–244. Cappelletti, p. 171. Peruzzi, pp. 138-139. Ritzler-Sefrin, Hierarchia catholica VII, p. 73.
  85. ^ A native of Corneto, Falzacappa had previously been a Canon of the Vatican Basilica, and then titular Archbishop of Athens (1819–1823). He was appointed a cardinal and Archbishop (personal title) of Ancona on the same day, 10 March 1823. He resigned the diocese of Ancona on 23 May 1824. Vercellone remarks that his membership in numerous bodies in the Roman Curia was the reason: in realtà sussistevano valide ragioni per evitare il suo allontanamento da Roma. Infatti era membro attivo di numerose congregazioni permanenti, come la Concistoriale, il S. Offizio, il Concilio, le Immunità, l'Indice, i Riti, il Cerimoniale, l'Esame dei vescovi, il Buon Governo e le Acque, oltre che di molte congregazioni straordinarie. He died in Rome, where he had been named Suburbicarian Bishop of Porto and Santa Rufina as well as Prefect of the Tribunal of the Apostolic Signature, on 18 November 1840. Gaetano Moroni, ed. (1843). Dizionario di erudizione storico-ecclesiastica (in Italian). Vol. XXIII. Venezia: Tipografia Emiliana. pp. 21–22. Peruzzi, p. 139. Ritzler-Sefrin, VII, pp. 73, 93. Guido Fagioli Vercellone, "Falzacappa, Giovanni Francesco," in: Dizionario Biografico degli Italiani Volume 44 (1994)
  86. ^ Born in Ancona in 1768, the son of Marchese Alessandro Nembrini Pironi Gonzaga and Maria Trionfi, Cesare Nembrini was educated in Recanati and then in Bologna at the Collegio Montalto. He served as civil governor of several cities in the Papal States under Pius VI and Pius VII. He was named Bishop of Ancona on 24 May 1824 by Pope Leo XII, and appointed a cardinal on 27 July 1829 by Pope Pius VIII. He died in Umana in the episcopal residence on 5 December 1837. Gaetano Moroni, ed. (1847). Dizionario di erudizione storico-ecclesiastica (in Italian). Vol. XLVII: Mos-Nic. Venezia: Tipografia Emiliana. pp. 264–265. Peruzzi, pp. 137-143. Ritzler-Sefrin, VII, p. 73.
  87. ^ Antonucci: Ritzler-Sefrin, VII, p. 193; VIII, 53, 99. Martin Bräuer (2014). Handbuch der Kardinäle: 1846-2012 (in German). Berlin: De Gruyter. p. 62. ISBN 978-3-11-026947-5.
  88. ^ Manara was a native of Bologna, son of a painter. His father had to supplement his income from commissions by teaching art in the municipal school of Lugo, where Achille had his early education. He attended the University of Bologna, enjoying the patronage of the Bishop of Lugo, Giovanni Mastai-Ferretti (later Pope Pius IX), and obtained a doctorate in theology and the doctorate in Civil and Canon Law (1855). He was named a Canon of the Collegiate Church of S. Petronio in Bologna by Pius IX in 1855. He served in the diocese of Bologna as ecclesastical judge, Chancellor, and pro-Vicar General. He was appointed Bishop of Ancona on 12 May 1879 by Pope Leo XIII, and named cardinal on 29 November 1895. He died on 15 February 1906. Albert Battandier, ed. (1907). Annuaire pontifical catholique 1907 (in French). Paris: La Bonne Presse. p. 645. Ritzler-Sefrin, VIII, pp. 51, 99. Bräuer, Handbuch der Kardinäle, p. 175.
  89. ^ A native of Milan, Giardini had been Apostolic Delegate in Tokyo (1922–1931), and titular Archbishop of Edessa (Mesopotamia). He was appointed Archbishop of Ancona e Numana on 16 May 1931, and resigned the diocese on 5 February 1940. On the same day he was named titular Archbishop of Laodicea (Syria). He died on 30 August 1941. Annuario Pontificio 1943 (Città del Vaticano 1943), p. 362. George Minamiki (1985). The Chinese rites controversy, from its beginning to modern times. Chicago: Loyola University Press. p. 135. ISBN 978-0-8294-0457-9. Charles R. Gallagher (2008). Vatican Secret Diplomacy: Joseph P. Hurley and Pope Pius XII. New Haven CT USA: Yale University Press. pp. 33–34. ISBN 978-0-300-14821-3.
  90. ^ Tettamanzi was born at Renate (Milano) in 1934. After teaching in seminaries at Masnago, Seveso and Venegono Inferiore, he was named Rector of the Pontificio Seminario Lombardo in Rome in 1987. On 1 July 1991 he was appointed Archbishop of Ancona-Osimo. He resigned the diocese on 6 April 1991, when he was appointed Secretary General of Episcopal Conference of Italy) for a four-year term. On 20 April 1995 he was appointed Archbishop of Genoa, and on 21 February 1998 he was named a cardinal by Pope John Paul II. He was appointed Archbishop of Milan on 11 July 2002. He died on 5 August 2017. Martin Bräuer (2014). Handbuch der Kardinäle: 1846-2012 (in German). Berlin: De Gruyter. pp. 582, 663. ISBN 978-3-11-026947-5. Chiesa di Milano, "E morto il cardinale Dionigio Tettamanzi" (5 August 2017); retrieved: 12 January 2019. (in Italian) Harris M. Lentz III (2015). Popes and Cardinals of the 20th Century: A Biographical Dictionary. McFarland. p. 187. ISBN 978-1-4766-2155-5.
  91. ^ Arcidiocesi di Ancona-Osimo, Arcivescovo: Mons. Angelo Spina; retrieved: 12 January 2019. (in Italian)

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