Reinerite

Reinerite is a rare arsenite (arsenate(III)) mineral with chemical formula Zn3(AsO3)2.[2][3] It crystallizes in the orthorhombic crystal system.

Reinerite
General
Categoryarsenite
Formula
(repeating unit)
Zn3(AsO3)2
Strunz classification4.JA.10
Crystal systemOrthorhombic
Crystal classDipyramidal (mmm)
H-M symbol: (2/m 2/m 2/m)
Space groupPbam (no. 55)
Unit cella = 6.092 Å, b = 14.407 Å
c = 7.811 Å; Z = 4
V = 685.55
a:b:c = 0.423 : 1 : 0.542
Identification
ColorSky blue, yellow green
Crystal habitRough striated pseudohexagonal crystals
CleavageGood on {110}, {011} and {111}
Mohs scale hardness5 - 5.5
LusterVitreous to adamantine
DiaphaneityTransparent
Specific gravity4.27
Optical propertiesBiaxial (-)
Refractive indexnα = 1.740 nβ = 1.790 nγ = 1.820
BirefringenceMaxium δ = 0.080
Other characteristicsRelief: very high
References[1][2][3][4]

Physical propertiesEdit

Reinerite is most commonly found as a sky blue colored mineral, however, it may also be a light yellowish green color. Reinerite has a relative hardness of 5 to 5.5 on the Mohs Scale which is equivalent to that of a knife blade and or shard of glass. It has a density of 4.27 g/cm3,[1] and it exhibits a nonmetallic luster that may be described as glassy or vitreous.[5]

EnvironmentEdit

Reinerite develops in dolomite-hosted locations. It is known especially from Namibia, Africa, within the mines of Tsumeb. At the Tsumeb location, Reinerite develops within the polymetallic lead-zinc-copper deposit, 800 m (2,600 ft) below the surface, in the second oxidation zone.[4] It occurs in association with chalcocite, bornite, willemite, smithsonite, hydrozincite, hemimorphite, adamite, olivenite and gebhardite.[2]

HistoryEdit

Reinerite was first described in 1958 for an occurrence in the Tsumeb Mine, Tsumeb, Namibia and named for senior chemist Willy Reiner (1895–1965) of Tsumeb Corporation, who analyzed this mineral.[1][3]

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ a b c Webmineral data
  2. ^ a b c Handbook of Mineralogy
  3. ^ a b c Mindat.org
  4. ^ a b American Mineralogist
  5. ^ Lutgens, Frederick, and Edward Tarbuck. Essentials of Geology. 10th. Upper Saddle River, New Jersey: Pearson Prentice Hall, 2009. 42. Print.