Otterwisch is a municipality in the Leipzig district in Saxony, Germany.

Otterwisch
Coat of arms of Otterwisch
Coat of arms
Location of Otterwisch within Leipzig district
Otterwisch in L.svg
Otterwisch is located in Germany
Otterwisch
Otterwisch
Otterwisch is located in Saxony
Otterwisch
Otterwisch
Coordinates: 51°12′N 12°37′E / 51.200°N 12.617°E / 51.200; 12.617Coordinates: 51°12′N 12°37′E / 51.200°N 12.617°E / 51.200; 12.617
CountryGermany
StateSaxony
DistrictLeipzig
Municipal assoc.Bad Lausick
Subdivisions2
Government
 • MayorMatthias Kauerauf
Area
 • Total22.74 km2 (8.78 sq mi)
Elevation
159 m (522 ft)
Population
 (2018-12-31)[1]
 • Total1,380
 • Density61/km2 (160/sq mi)
Time zoneCET/CEST (UTC+1/+2)
Postal codes
04668
Dialling codes034345
Vehicle registrationL, BNA, GHA, GRM, MTL, WUR
Websitewww.gemeinde-otterwisch.de

Geography and transportEdit

The town is situated about 12 km southwest of Grimma and 10 km northeast of Borna. The Leipzig–Geithain railroad passes through the town and the national road B 176 transverses the south of the parish.

HistoryEdit

The first documented mention of Otterwisch was in 1269. The meaning of the place name is not known for certain but may be derived from Otter Wiese (otter meadow). Großbuch is a part of Otterwisch since 1970. Its foundation dates back to the year 1104 and Wiprecht of Groitzsch. Its central point is the church in whose massive tower three valuable bronze bells from pre-Reformation times still function.

Großbuch was the scene of witch trials in the period 1488–1489.[2]

 
Otterwisch House, from the park side

Sights of interestEdit

Otterwisch House is in private ownership and is being renovated. It was built between 1727 and 1730 by Duchess Rahel Charlotte Vitzthum von Eckstädt in the Baroque style. It belonged to the von Arnim family from 1904 to 1945.[3]

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ "Bevölkerung des Freistaates Sachsen jeweils am Monatsende ausgewählter Berichtsmonate nach Gemeinden" (PDF). Statistisches Landesamt des Freistaates Sachsen (in German). July 2019.
  2. ^ Manfred Wilde: Die Zauberei- und Hexenprozesse in Kursachsen, Köln, Weimar, Wien 2003, S. 476.
  3. ^ Geschichte von Schloß Otterwisch