Ochsenfurt is a town in the district of Würzburg, in Bavaria, Germany. Ochsenfurt is located on the left bank of the River Main and has around 11,000 inhabitants. This makes it the largest town in Würzburg district.[2]

Ochsenfurt
Townhall in Ochsenfurt
Townhall in Ochsenfurt
Coat of arms of Ochsenfurt
Coat of arms
Location of Ochsenfurt within Würzburg district
Ochsenfurt in WÜ.svg
Ochsenfurt is located in Germany
Ochsenfurt
Ochsenfurt
Ochsenfurt is located in Bavaria
Ochsenfurt
Ochsenfurt
Coordinates: 49°39′N 10°04′E / 49.650°N 10.067°E / 49.650; 10.067Coordinates: 49°39′N 10°04′E / 49.650°N 10.067°E / 49.650; 10.067
CountryGermany
StateBavaria
Admin. regionUnterfranken
DistrictWürzburg
Subdivisions9 Stadtteile/Stadtbezirke
Government
 • MayorPeter Juks (UWG)
Area
 • Total63.55 km2 (24.54 sq mi)
Elevation
187 m (614 ft)
Population
 (2018-12-31)[1]
 • Total11,319
 • Density180/km2 (460/sq mi)
Time zoneCET/CEST (UTC+1/+2)
Postal codes
97199
Dialling codes09331
Vehicle registrationWÜ, OCH
Websitewww.ochsenfurt.de

Contents

NameEdit

Like Oxford, the town of Ochsenfurt is named after a ford where oxen crossed the river.

GeographyEdit

LocationEdit

The town is situated on the left bank of the River Main, 21 kilometres (13 mi) south of Würzburg.

SubdivisionEdit

The Stadtteile of Ochsenfurt are: Darstadt, Erlach, Goßmannsdorf, Hohestadt, Hopferstadt, Kleinochsenfurt, Tückelhausen and Zeubelried.[2]

HistoryEdit

 
Painting of Ochsenfurt - 1623

Ochsenfurt was one of the places in Germany where King Richard I of England was detained in 1193 while on his way to England from the Third Crusade.[3]

A monastery, Tückelhausen Charterhouse, dedicated to Saints Lambert, John the Baptist and George, was founded in 1138 by Otto I, Bishop of Bamberg, as a double canonry of the Premonstratensians. From 1351 it belonged to the Carthusians and was secularised in 1803.[4]

AttractionsEdit

The charterhouse was largely converted for private residential use and since 1991 contains a museum of Carthusian life.

Ochsenfurt also features several Protestant and Roman Catholic churches, among them that of St Michael (Michaelskapelle), a Gothic edifice[5]

EconomyEdit

 
Alte Mainbrücke, after the post-WW II rebuilding

In 1911 there was a considerable trade in wine and agricultural products, other industries being brewing and malting.[5] Ochsenfurt also has one of the largest sugar factories in Germany.

GovernanceEdit

MayorEdit

Peter Juks (UWG) is the mayor of Ochsenfurt.[6]

Town twinningEdit

Ochsenfurt is twinned with:

GalleryEdit

Notable peopleEdit

BibliographyEdit

  • Die Kunstdenkmäler von Unterfranken, Bd. 1: Bezirksamt Ochsenfurt. 2nd edition 1983. ISBN 978-3-486-50455-2
  • Halbleib, Volker; Kretzer, Heinz (2006). Ochsenfurt. Sutton. ISBN 978-3-86680-000-7. Retrieved 4 March 2010.

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ "Fortschreibung des Bevölkerungsstandes". Bayerisches Landesamt für Statistik und Datenverarbeitung (in German). July 2019.
  2. ^ a b "Ochsenfurt - Wissenswertes (German)". Ochsenfurt municipality. Retrieved 23 January 2018.
  3. ^ Stacey, Robert C. "Walter, Hubert (d. 1205)" Oxford Dictionary of National Biography Oxford University Press, 2004 Online Edition accessed November 8, 2007
  4. ^ "Tückelhausen (German)". Haus der Bayerischen Geschichte. Retrieved 23 January 2018.
  5. ^ a b   One or more of the preceding sentences incorporates text from a publication now in the public domainChisholm, Hugh, ed. (1911). "Ochsenfurt". Encyclopædia Britannica. 19 (11th ed.). Cambridge University Press. p. 990.
  6. ^ "Ochsenfurt - Grusswort (German)". Ochsenfurt municipality. Retrieved 23 January 2018.
  7. ^ "Ropczyce - Miasta Partnerskie". Urząd Miejski Ropczyce (in Polish). Archived from the original on 2012-09-22. Retrieved 2013-08-01.
  8. ^ "Dorset Twinning Association List". The Dorset Twinning Association. Archived from the original on 2012-06-21. Retrieved 2013-08-01.

External linksEdit