Object complement

In grammar, an object complement is a predicative expression that follows a direct object of an attributive ditransitive verb or resultative verb and that complements the direct object of the sentence by describing it.[1][2][3] Object complements are constituents of the predicate. Noun phrases and adjective phrases most frequently function as object complements.[4]

ExamplesEdit

The object complement is bold in the following examples:

  • She painted the barn red. – Adjective as object complement

Here, painted is an attributive ditransitive verb. The direct object is the barn. The object complement construction allows for the combination of the sentences She painted the barn and The barn was painted red.

  • He considers you a friend. – Noun phrase as object complement

Here, considers is an attributive ditransitive verb. The direct object is you. The object complement construction allows for the combination of the sentences He considers you and You are a friend.

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Brinton, Laurel J. & Donna M. Brinton. 2010. The linguistic structure of Modern English, 2nd edn. Amsterdam: John Benjamins Publishing Company.
  2. ^ Hopper, Paul J. 1999. A short course in grammar. New York: W. W. Norton & Company.
  3. ^ Huddleston, Rodney. 1984. Introduction to the grammar of English. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
  4. ^ Quirk, Randolph, Sidney Greenbaum, Jan Svartvik, & Geoffrey Leech. 1985. A comprehensive grammar of the English language. London: Longman.