Nordia (Hebrewנוֹרְדִיָּה‎) is a moshav shitufi in central Israel. Located in the Sharon plain near Netanya[2] and the HaSharon Junction, it falls under the jurisdiction of Lev HaSharon Regional Council. In 2019 it had a population of 1,950.[1]

Nordia

נוֹרְדִיָּה
WikiAir Flight IL-14-02 - Nordia (1).JPG
Nordia is located in Central Israel
Nordia
Nordia
Coordinates: 32°18′51.83″N 34°53′45.23″E / 32.3143972°N 34.8958972°E / 32.3143972; 34.8958972Coordinates: 32°18′51.83″N 34°53′45.23″E / 32.3143972°N 34.8958972°E / 32.3143972; 34.8958972
CountryIsrael
DistrictCentral
CouncilLev HaSharon
AffiliationMishkei Herut Beitar
Founded1948
Founded byDemobbed soldiers
Population
 (2019)[1]
1,950
Websitewww.nordiya.org

HistoryEdit

 
Entrance to Nordia

In 1926, the American Zion Commonwealth announced plans to establish a new agricultural settlement to be named "Nordia" in memory of the Zionist leader Max Nordau. Land was sold in the United States for this purpose, but the plan did not come to fruition.[3]

Nordia was founded on 2 November 1948 by demobilised Irgun and Betar soldiers, members of the Herut movement,[4]on the land of the depopulated Palestinian village of Khirbat Bayt Lid,[5][6] The founders came from two units - Margolim based in Kfar Yona and Wedgwood (named after Josiah Wedgwood) based in Mishmar HaYarden.

In 1994 a new neighborhood, Neot Nordia, was established.[citation needed]

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ a b "Population in the Localities 2019" (XLS). Israel Central Bureau of Statistics. Retrieved 16 August 2020.
  2. ^ Saposhnik, Tamar Lubin (2014). From Chaos to Order. New York, New York: Page Publishing. ISBN 9781628386936.
  3. ^ Glass, Joseph B. (2018). From New Zion to Old Zion: American Jewish Immigration and Settlement in Palestine, 1917-1939. Detroit: Wayne State University Press. ISBN 9780814344224.
  4. ^ Israel: A History, Martin Gilbert
  5. ^ Morris, Benny (2004). The Birth of the Palestinian Refugee Problem Revisited. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. p. xxi. ISBN 978-0-521-00967-6.
  6. ^ Khalidi, Walid (1992), All That Remains: The Palestinian Villages Occupied and Depopulated by Israel in 1948, Washington D.C.: Institute for Palestine Studies, p. 550, ISBN 0-88728-224-5

External linksEdit