Michael Laucke (born 29 January 1947) is a Canadian classical, new flamenco, and flamenco guitarist and composer, and a music industry businessman. Starting at the age of thirteen, Laucke gave professional snooker demonstrations and his winnings allowed him to take trips from Montreal to New York City to study the classical guitar with Rolando Valdés-Blain. Still active in a career spanning five decades, Laucke began performing in 1965, recording the first of 16 albums in 1969, and has toured in 25 countries. In 1971, he performed his first of many concerts at the National Gallery of Art in Washington, D.C. His first concert in New York, where he also first met Senator Claiborne Pell, took place in 1972.

Michael Laucke
Laucke, seated in half profile, playing his guitar and smiling while looking away from the camera
Laucke in 2011
Background information
Also known asYoung Mike
Born (1947-01-29) 29 January 1947 (age 72)
Montreal, Quebec, Canada
Genres
Occupation(s)
  • Instrumentalist
  • music industry businessman[1]
  • music producer
InstrumentsClassical guitar, flamenco guitar
Labels
Associated acts
WebsiteMichaelLaucke.com
Signature
MichaelLaucke signature (png).png

Laucke was introduced to complex flamenco techniques by Spanish guitarist Paco de Lucía when the two shared a loft and performed together for the jet set in New York City in the early 1970s. In 1982 he was selected by Andrés Segovia to perform for the PBS network at the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York City. Laucke subsequently became Segovia's pupil, and also studied with other classical guitar players, including Julian Bream and Alirio Díaz. He performed mainly on classical guitar until 1990; from then on, his concerts have consisted exclusively of flamenco and new flamenco works.

Laucke has broadened the guitar repertoire by creating over 100 transcriptions of classical and flamenco music. Several notable Canadian composers have written atonal works for him. SOCAN's The Music Scene magazine considered Laucke to be one of "five of Canada's best-known soloists".[5] Music critic emeritus, historian, and musician Eric McLean of the Montreal Gazette avowed: "Laucke is the person who has done more for the guitar in this country than anyone else."[6] He has received many other awards and honours throughout his career, including the Grand Prix du Disque-Canada for Best Canadian Recording.

Contents

Early lifeEdit

 
Laucke won against the North American snooker champion

Laucke was born in Montreal, Quebec, Canada on 29 January 1947 to parents of Russian and Polish-Jewish heritage. After they separated when Laucke was six months old, he lived with his mother, brother, uncle, and grandmother. His grandmother raised and nurtured him; she died at the age of 100.[7]

At the age of seven, Laucke appeared in the Montreal Star newspaper having designed and built a boat from 2,000 toothpicks.[8] A yo-yo expert by age ten, he soon discovered that he loved performing and competing,[9][10] eventually winning a C$60 bicycle as the champion among 2,000 contestants in a Montreal yo-yo competition.[11] He discovered an interest in playing guitar, but his brother disapproved, so he practiced at friends' homes. He also took up snooker, and became competent enough by the age of thirteen to gain a job as a demonstrator for the Brunswick Corporation, a snooker table manufacturer. Laucke learned billiards from George Chenier, a fellow Montrealer and the North American snooker champion.[12] The two faced each again four years later at the North American snooker championships in Montreal, where Laucke won the championship.[13] Laucke recalls: "Then I decided to leave snooker, I had done what I wanted to do... My love for the guitar was overwhelming. There was a lot more money in snooker, but snooker was just a passion, and music was my love."[14] Laucke's snooker winnings allowed him to finance 110 trips from Montreal to New York City to study the classical guitar with Franco-Spaniard Rolando Valdés-Blain.[15][16]

Early careerEdit

With Frank Angelo as his manager since 1961, Laucke performed his first guitar concert in Montreal in 1965, a program of atonal music with the Société de musique contemporaine du Québec. In 1971, following the first of his many concerts at the National Gallery of Art in Washington, D.C., The Washington Post proclaimed that Laucke had displayed "the highest form of virtuosity".[17] His first concert in New York took place in 1972 at the Greenwich House Music School. Senator Claiborne Pell was in attendance and invited Laucke to perform his first concerts in Washington, DC, thus beginning a 15-year affiliation as Laucke's active supporter in the U.S.[18] Pell's former campaign manager, Raymond Nelson, handled logistics for many of Laucke's U.S. performances.[19] In 1973, Laucke starred in a documentary produced by Radio-Québec called La Guitare,[20] and he performed at Montreal's Summer Olympic Games in 1976.[21]

 
With his teacher, the classical guitarist Julian Bream

Laucke studied with several classical guitar masters: Franco–Spaniard Rolando Valdès-Blain from 1963 to 1977, Julian Bream in 1969 as winner of the Julian Bream Master classes, Alirio Díaz from 1977 to 1979 and Andrés Segovia from 1982 to 1986.[22][23] Laucke was introduced to complex and advanced flamenco techniques by Spanish guitarist Paco de Lucía when the two shared a loft in New York City in the early 1970s.[24][25] During this period, de Lucía and Laucke gave a concert in the Spanish Embassy, where Countess Elsa Peretti, jewelry designer at Tiffany's, first heard the two guitarists. She immediately invited them to one of her parties at her New York penthouse, where the two guitarists performed in private for the New York City jet set, including fashion designer Calvin Klein, Andy Warhol, Halston, and Giorgio di Sant'Angelo.[26] The Montreal Gazette noted that these artistic gatherings were: "the closest thing to the 18th century intellectual and artistic salon to be found anywhere these days".[9] Laucke was frequently hired to play at the launches of Giorgio di Sant' Angelo's new fashion lines and later those of Calvin Klein.[27] "I was only 21 at the time, and it all seemed like a dream," Laucke recalled.[28] In 1977, he founded Trio 3 with Sayyd Abdul Al-Khabyyr and Pauline Vaillancourt,[29] and the D'Addario strings-manufacturing company became his sponsor.[30]

His recording of works by William Walton, Richard Rodney Bennett, and François Morel on the Radio Canada International label (RCI 457) won the Canadian Music Council's Grand Prix du Disque-Canada in 1979.[31] The album included Morel's new composition Me duele España, written for and dedicated to Laucke. The world premiere of the 21-minute piece took place at Place des Arts in Montreal, under the auspices of the Société de musique contemporaine du Québec.[32]

Later that year, with an increasing number of concerts and recordings, and a busy travel schedule, Laucke became concerned that he would not have enough hours left for practising. He invented a "practiser": a small, wooden fingerboard with six strings stretched across a bridge. The device measured 8 by 4 inches (20 by 10 centimetres) and allowed him to practice quietly during travel. Laucke found that: "Those extra hours of finger exercises pay off in handsome performance dividends."[33]

Laucke recorded his last classical album in 1981 with singer Riki Turofsky and Guitar and Lute magazine declared it: "One of the best voice and guitar albums you will ever hear."[34] Although Laucke had played both classical and flamenco guitar music from an early age, he performed mainly classical guitar works until 1990.[35] From late 1990 onwards, his concerts have consisted exclusively of many flamenco and new flamenco works he learned from de Lucía.[36]

TeachingEdit

He was a professor of guitar at Concordia University in Montreal in 1976, but left after two years to pursue a performing career, and has not taught guitar since. Ten years later, however, he released an eight-tape instructional video series, to pass along the knowledge he had learned from his teachers. This video series was reviewed by Guitar Player magazine: "Laucke's enthusiasm is infectious"[37] and by Frets Magazine: "thoughtful and thorough instruction".[38] Laucke has also published articles on classical guitar.

Style and influencesEdit

 
Laucke with his group at Place des Arts – Montreal

Laucke's classical/flamenco musical style is a blend of his classical studies with Bream, Segovia, Valdès-Blain, and his friendship with de Lucía.[39] Although classical and flamenco guitar are two quite different musical styles, Québec's French-language newspaper Le Soleil chronicled Laucke's feelings and reasoning about performing both.[40]

Excerpt from Flamenco Road song by Laucke in 24 track version, a sample of the (new flamenco) style

Since the classical guitar is limited, you eventually look for something else. I was doing flamenco, and I love it. There are more varied techniques in flamenco; just in the right hand alone, we have 20 of them.[41]

I would like flamenco to become the new jazz! Flamenco has everything that it takes to follow in the footsteps of jazz and become a language to people of all countries and all cultures. We forget that before being a universal language, jazz was only the mode of expression of blacks in New Orleans! Like jazz, flamenco is based on improvisation and dialogue between instrumentalists. And flamenco is something even more, since players also interact with the dancers.
(English translation)[42]

His blend of the classical and flamenco styles, sometimes referred to as "new flamenco" (nuevo flamenco), led music critic Eric McLean of the Montreal Gazette to proclaim: "It is Laucke's interest in flamenco that makes him special: He might be called the first interpreter of flamenco music, in the sense that he borrows these traditional works by Sabicas, Carlos Montoya and Paco de Lucía, and employs them in his own fashion, a practice to which they agree."[43] Laucke summarized: "The Spanish guitar remains my first love. The flamenco guitar is my passion."[25] According to The Music Scene magazine published by Society of Composers, Authors and Music Publishers of Canada (SOCAN),[5] he is one of "five of Canada's best-known soloists" and the Canadian federal and provincial governments gave him "full recognition as the person who has done more for the guitar in this country than anyone else".[6]

Paco de LucíaEdit

 
Laucke with his friend and mentor Paco de Lucía
"Between Two Seas" ("Entre dos Aguas") by Paco de Lucía, arranged and played by Laucke

In the 1970s, Laucke moved to New York City to further his career. He was asked by Valdès-Blain if he would mind sharing his one-room apartment with flamenco guitarist Paco de Lucía.[11][44] Laucke taught de Lucía music by Bach and Villa-Lobos. In return, de Lucía showed Laucke some of the secrets of his art of flamenco, an oral tradition handed down through generations, "their secrets and knowledge jealously guarded".[24] Although Laucke had played flamenco for his own pleasure since he was a child, he had never felt comfortable playing it in public. De Lucía's influence helped change this: "This meeting changed my life," Laucke declared, "he taught me flamenco works which were not written anywhere and to which no other guitarist had access. So for me to be taught all these techniques by a guitarist of Paco's caliber was an incredible stroke of luck". (English translation)[24]

In an interview with the Montreal Gazette, Laucke stated: "[de Lucía] was the greatest natural talent I have ever come across." At the time, Laucke was impressed by a piece called Entre dos aguas (Between Two Seas) that de Lucía was creating, which has become arguably his best-known composition.[45][46] Since de Lucía did not read music, Laucke offered to teach him but he refused. When the question arose as to whether Laucke would ever play de Lucía's compositions in public, he advised Laucke, "you must do it in your own style".[47]

He teamed up again with de Lucía to give a series of concerts combining the two repertoires.[9] Many newspapers talked about this association.[48] The Canadian Spanish magazine El Popular stated: "Laucke is convinced that flamenco possesses enormous seductive powers. 'The harmonies and the rhythm leave no one indifferent', says Laucke."[49]

The meeting with de Lucía led Laucke to perform two incompatible guitar styles. In 1991, he recorded compositions de Lucía taught him on the album Spanish Guitar Stories.[50] De Lucía expressed his approval, saying the album was: "very beautiful, all of it, from a to z, even my pieces!"[49]

Flamenco Road albumEdit

On 12 September 2001, Laucke released a CD called Flamenco Road, consisting mainly of his own compositions in the new flamenco style, which he also arranged. In an interview for Voir magazine, Laucke stated: "It is also very influenced by my classical background. So it's a smoother flamenco." An example of this style from the album can be heard in Laucke's treatment of the well-known classical guitar transcription "Leyenda", which is given a flamenco rendition using several percussion instruments (claves, maracas, special castanets mounted on wood blocks, chimes, and a large gong), bass, and flute.[51]

Ten works were recorded at five different studios in Montreal, each chosen for its unique acoustics. The instrumentation for the recording's title piece, "Flamenco Road", required the use of 24 tracks. It comprises a combination of four types of guitars—flamenco, Spanish, classical, and electric—and all natural acoustic guitars are played the Spanish way, using all the fingers of the right hand without a pick. The rhythm section includes bongos, four congas, and a rock drum set blended with other percussion instruments such as claves, maracas, and castanets. It further incorporates three dancers performing typical "palmas" (hand-clapping) in synchronization, as well as three trumpets, three pianos, and a "country-style" violinist.[52]

The enhanced CD includes two videos: one with interactive live concert footage filmed during Laucke's tenth season at Montreal’s Place des Arts, and the other with the video clip of "Flamenco Road". The latter reached number one on video charts across Canada for five consecutive weeks.[53]

Contributions to the guitar repertoireEdit

TranscriptionsEdit

SOCAN lists 112 classical works transcribed for the guitar by Laucke, illustrating the extent to which he has broadened the guitar's repertoire in music of the Renaissance, classical, baroque, and romantic eras, as well as in flamenco. Library and Archives Canada and Canadian Libraries list 43 music recordings, music scores of transcriptions for guitar and Canadian guitar articles written by Laucke.[54] Waterloo Music Company published and distributed 24 of Laucke's guitar transcriptions of works by J. S. Bach, Luis de Narváez, Eric Satie, Heitor Villa-Lobos and others.[55]

Trois Gymnopédies by Eric SatieEdit

While living in Greenwich Village, New York, in the early 1970s, Laucke became interested in the French music of Eric Satie, "the world's first hippie".[56] At that time, only simplified arrangements of Trois Gymnopédies (Three Gymnopédies)[57][58] existed for the guitar, so Laucke set out to transcribe Satie's three works from the piano score. Determined to fit all of the notes from the original piano version using the guitar's six strings, over the course of three weeks he calculated the number of times open strings would occur per note.[59]

In 1979, Laucke signed with the Waterloo Music Publishing Company, which that year published the sheet music of his transcription of Trois Gymnopédies, the first of many of his transcriptions to be published by Waterloo and arguably the only version for guitar to include all of the notes of the original piano composition. In 1985, the company created The Michael Laucke Series of guitar arrangements and transcriptions.[60]

In the introductory notes to his sheet music for Trois Gymnopédies, Laucke comments: "The characteristic harmonies of much of the music of Erik Satie belong to the impressionist period and, though originally written for the piano, are extremely well-suited to the natural idiomatic expression of the guitar. This has led me to make these transcriptions which will enrich the repertoire of the guitar while remaining faithful to Satie's intentions."[61]

After giving many concert performances of these works, Laucke recorded them on his CD entitled Flamenco Road which held the number one position on video charts across Canada for six weeks.[53] The liner notes read: "My arrangements of 'The [sic] Three Gymnopédies' comprise ALL the notes of the original piano versions: a most complex process since all the piano sounds must fit comfortably, or uncomfortably, onto the six strings of the guitar." He continues to say: "The present recording is done as it is in concert, on one classical guitar, without overdubbing. My tempo is a little quicker than when the pieces are played on the piano, due to the shorter resonance time of notes played on the Spanish guitar. Now and then, I use a 'vibrato' and slides, which, of course, can't be done on the piano but which add warmth of expression to this undeniably charming, exotic and mystic music." [62]

Original worksEdit

Laucke has had 25 original, Canadian atonal works written for him, among them the Flamenco Concierto for guitar and full symphonic orchestra by Michel-Georges Brégent,[63] Me duele España by François Morel,[64] Exploration by Jean Papineau-Couture[65] and Pour guitare, Claude Vivier's only work for the guitar.[66] Laucke performed all 25 works in major halls, on CBC radio and on his record albums; all of them were commissioned by, and dedicated to, Laucke.[67]

In 1984, critics began to take note of the growth of new Canadian guitar works energized by Laucke. In La Presse, a Canadian newspaper, music critic Claude Gingras found in Laucke "an interpreter who could not be more convincing".[68] Canadian composer Claude Vivier expressed his appreciation to Laucke. In his letters, Vivier states that he had: "hardly ever met a musician as committed and dedicated, of such great quality and, above all, of such great completeness and intense capacity for work".[69]

World toursEdit

 
During the CBC documentary on the Great Wall of China

Laucke's career spans over 50 years, with concert and television appearances in 25 countries,[70][71] including England (Wigmore Hall),[72][73] the U.S. (Carnegie Hall,[65] and the White House),[74] as well as China, on the Great Wall of China.[75] Other countries where Laucke performed include Bulgaria, Hungary, Hong Kong, Spain, Israel, India, Japan, Morocco, Pakistan, and Russia.[76] In Canada, he has given annual concerts at Montreal's Place des Arts since 1986.[77] Following a concert in 1990 in Quebec City's Grand Théâtre de Québec, the French-language newspaper Le Soleil wrote a review entitled "Michael Laucke makes one fall in love with the guitar", stating: "More than a virtuoso, charismatic Michael Laucke is pure talent! For him playing is instinctive, just like breathing ...irresistible Michael Laucke."[78] Critics have often written about Laucke's stage presence. A Chicago music critic described how: "His relaxed manner, beaming smile and gracious speaking voice won the hearts of the audience before he even played a note."[79]

He performed many concerts in Washington, DC, under the auspices of U.S. Senator Claiborne Pell,[18] including several at the National Gallery of Art. The Washington Post proclaimed that Laucke is: "one of the finest guitarists to have played in Washington in a long time."[17] On another occasion, Laucke gave the premiere of Bregent's "Version of Sapho," written for him, an atonal work which received a less favorable critique. The Washington Post stated: "Since the mind can only respond to some sort of form, its essential formlessness precludes discussion. A triad out of the blue signaled the end, which the large audience recognized and applauded."[80]

Personal lifeEdit

 
With Elton John, working on the fight against HIV/AIDS

In 1994, Laucke became a director of the Mac AIDS Fund (M·A·F) established by his friend Frank Angelo, the co-founder of MAC Cosmetics.[81] After a fourteen-year tenure, he became honorary charter member of the board of directors and no longer participated in its activities.[82] According to Laucke, MAF's directors helped coordinate the film Pandemic: Facing AIDS by Rory Kennedy, and MAF became a secondary sponsor while the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation became title sponsor.[83]

Present dayEdit

After over 50 years of concert performances, Laucke continues an active career. Besides numerous concert appearances in North America, he has recently accepted more international tours. A new album called Flamenco Road 2 is in preparation as of September 2015. He is also an entrepreneur and businessman in the music industry.[1]

In 2012, Laucke was nominated for the Order of Canada Lifetime Achievement Award. In 2015, he was again nominated for the same award; the results will be announced in 2016.[84]

MediaEdit

AudioEdit

VideoEdit

Selected worksEdit

CDEdit

  • Flamenco Road (2001)[53]
  • Michael Laucke & Fiesta Flamenco: Live (1996)
  • Spanish Guitar (1993)
  • Momentum – IMAX Film (the music) (1992)
  • Spanish Guitar Stories (1991)[85]
  • Light Classics (1990)[86]

LPEdit

  • Take A Short Cut (1989)[87]
  • Canadian Guitar Music (1987)
  • Music For Jacques Cartier (1986)[88]
  • Canadian Guitar Quartet: Live From (1985)
  • Com-Possession (1985)[89]
  • Divergences (1984)[90]
  • Jade Eyes (1980)[91]
  • Michael Laucke, Guitarist: Grand Prix du Disque-Canada, (1979)[92]
  • Trio 3 (1979)
  • Transcription (1969)

FilmographyEdit

  • Momentum (IMAX film) (1992)
  • I Won't Dance (1991)
  • How to Play Solo Classical Guitar (1985)
  • Michael Laucke: Guitar recital, CBC (1983)
  • Segovia: Metropolitan museum: a master class, PBS (1982)
  • Form & Fire: Michael Laucke (1981)
  • Musique instrumentale: La guitare (1973)[20]

Atonal works written for LauckeEdit

The following works have been performed by Laucke in Carnegie Hall (performing Jean Papineau-Couture), Wigmore Hall (Michel-Georges Brégent),[93] and National Gallery of Art (Michel Gonneville).[94] In Canada, the SMCQ honoured Laucke's contribution by featuring him in a two-hour-long concert.[95]

  • Départ by François Morel (1970)
  • Iikkii by François Morel (1970)
  • Pour Guitare by Claude Vivier (1976)[66]
  • Le Cercle gnostique by Walter Boudreau (1976)
  • Me duele españa by François Morel (1979)[96]
  • Contrastare no 1 by David Eagle (1980)[97]
  • La Fille du Pecheur by Alan Crossman (1981)[98]
  • Calme en soi by Bruno Deschênes (1981)[99]
  • Quatre études, Anachorétisme, Quatre mouvements by Claude Lassonde (1982)[100]
  • Image et Sonoritéé, Silène pur Satyre, La Règne by Claude Lassonde (1982)
  • Com-possession by John Rea (1983)[101]
  • ...ascends at full moon by John Burke
  • Exploration by Jean Papineau-Couture (1983)[65]
  • Le Sommeil, le Regard, le Choix by Michel Gonneville (1983)
  • Three Amerindian Songs, Prelude by Wolfgang Bottenberg (1983)[102]
  • Sapho by Michel-Georges Brégent (1983)[103]
  • Divergence by François Morel (1983)
  • Pas de deux by Denis Dion (1983)[104]
  • Cobwebs in my Spanish castle by Leon Zukert (1983)[105]
  • Chamber Concierto for guitar by Donald Steven (1986)
  • Concierto Flamenco by Michel-Georges Brégent (1991)[63]

ArticlesEdit

Laucke has published articles in music journals about the growth in popularity of the guitar in Canada including:

  • "The Guitar in Canada" (five pages)‍—‌Soundboard Magazine, California[106]
  • "Growth of the Guitar in Canada", by Michael Laucke (six pages)‍—‌Guitar and Lute magazine, Hawaii[107]
  • "Michael Laucke Writes About the Canadian Guitar"‍—‌Waterloo Music Journal, Canada[108]

TimelineEdit

 
With Andrés Segovia‍—‌PBS TV at Metropolitan Museum of Art NYC
  • 1976, he performed at Montreal's Olympic Games[21]
  • 1979, Laucke won the Grand Prix du Disque-Canada for Best Canadian Recording[109]
  • 1981, Laucke was invited to perform a Command performance for His Excellency the Right Honourable Edward Schreyer the Governor General of Canada and his wife, as winner of the Jules Léger Prize for New Chamber Music[110]
  • March 1982, Laucke's album Jade Eyes, for CBS records, was reviewed by Guitar and Lute magazine (Hawaii) as the best international classical guitar album of the year[91][111]
  • 1982, he was selected by Segovia to perform a 25-minute work by Manuel Ponce which was filmed by the PBS network at the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York, after which he became Segovia's pupil.[112][113]
  • 1985, 8 to 12 February‍—‌five days of interviews and career profile, two hours each day, on CBC Radio's Morningside with Peter Gzowski[114]
  • 1986, on the 450th anniversary of Jacques Cartier's first voyage of discovery to Canada, Canadian Heritage requested that Laucke record a commemorative album. Laucke recorded music that Cartier would have heard on his voyage to the new world[115]
  • 1986, several musical publications mention Laucke's contribution to the guitar and its new repertoire. SOCAN, the Canadian copyright organization, stated in The Music Scene magazine, that they considered Laucke to be one of "five of Canada's best-known soloists"[5]
  • 1986, he created an instructional video series which was critically reviewed by Guitar Player magazine[37] and Frets Magazine.[38]
  • May 1988, two years later, Canada's music Critic Emeritus Eric McLean wrote in the Montreal Gazette that Laucke was then recognized as: "the person who has done more for the guitar in this country than anyone else"[6]
  • 1991, Laucke performed the world premiere of the Flamenco Concierto with the Montreal Symphony Orchestra. Written for him by Michel-Georges Brégent, reviewers called it "Brilliant".[63]
  • 1992, Laucke performed in a Super IMAX film called Momentum, for the National Film Board of Canada; it was shown in the Canadian pavilion during the Universal Exposition of Seville (Expo '92)‍—‌a world's fair.[116] The most popular pavilions for the visitors were those of Spain and Canada. Co-directed by Colin Low, it is the first film in 48 frames per second IMAX HD.[117]
  • 12 September 2001, Laucke's CD Flamenco Road reached number one on video charts across Canada for five consecutive weeks[53]

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ a b Eric McLean (1 November 1986). "When Laucke plays the guitar, he means business". Montreal Gazette. Archived from the original on 4 November 2016. Retrieved 6 April 2016. He is a private enterprise—and an enterprise of some complexity. The name of it is Michael Laucke and Company, and it involves not only his concert career, but his recordings, his taped guitar lessons and his international negotiations
  2. ^ Matthew Astier (1991). "Spanish guitar stories [sound recording] / Michael Laucke". amicus.collectionscanada.gc.ca. Intermède Musique. Retrieved 6 April 2016.
  3. ^ Matthew Astier. "Light classics [sound recording] / Michael Laucke". amicus.collectionscanada.gc.ca. Intermède Musique. Retrieved 6 April 2016.
  4. ^ Matthew Astier (1985). "Winners of the Jules Léger Prize for new chamber music [sound recording]". amicus.collectionscanada.gc.ca. Montreal, McGill University Records. Retrieved 6 April 2016.
  5. ^ a b c Lynn Harting (1 July 1986). "Commissioning: The Performer's perspective". The Music Scene. Archived from the original on 4 November 2016. [...five of the country's best-known soloists]
  6. ^ a b c Eric McLean (21 May 1988). "Guitarist Laucke bids temporary farewell to Montreal". Montreal Gazette. Archived from the original on 4 November 2016. Retrieved 20 April 2016. Both the Canada Council and the Quebec Ministry of Cultural Affairs are giving him full recognition as the person who has done more for the guitar in this country than anyone else
  7. ^ Francisco Jose Vital (14 June 1996). "Michael Laucke Da al Flamenco el Lugar que Merece" [Michael Laucke raises flamenco to the heights it deserves]. El Popular. Inspiración que le vino primero de su abuela, la qual se encargó de su educacion y le inspiró confianza en sí mismo. Michael Laucke nos habla con ternura de esta abuela que estuvo a punto de alcanzar los 100 años de edad, y que tan le ha aportado. "Inspiration that first came to him from his grandmother who raised him and who gave him self-confidence. When he speaks of his grandmother, who gave him so much and who nearly reached 100 years of age, it is with great tenderness." (English translation)
  8. ^ "Building is his hobby". Montreal Star. 26 January 1954. Archived from the original on 20 February 2016. Retrieved 12 November 2015.
  9. ^ a b c Eric McLean (16 January 1982). "Guitarist Laucke: Color him competitive". The Saturday Gazette. Archived from the original on 4 November 2016. Retrieved 20 April 2016.
  10. ^ Maxine Ruvinsky (29 June 1988). "Guitarist at home in concert and pool halls". The London Free Press. Archived from the original on 6 August 2016. Retrieved 20 April 2016. In every superhero, I saw myself.
  11. ^ a b Carl Urquhart (2 May 1988). "Yo-yo whiz masters all kinds of strings". The Montreal Daily News. Archived from the original on 4 November 2016. Retrieved 20 April 2016. At an early stage, he discovered he got pleasure from exhibiting his talents while people watched. Out of 2000 people who had gathered to compete, Laucke emerged as the winner, taking home a $60 bicycle.
  12. ^ Patrick Guigui (24 April 2014). "Celebrity Snooker Fans – Snooker Canada". Snooker Canada. Archived from the original on 17 November 2015. Retrieved 8 November 2015.
  13. ^ "Snooker champ shows stuff". Montreal Star. 3 December 1963. Georges Chenier, professional North American snooker champion, played ...a local youth, Michael Laucke, who shows promise of becoming the next Canadian amateur Champion. (Laucke won after two nights of play).
  14. ^ "Concert career clicks for guitarist: Guitarist and billiards champ Michael Laucke says the movement of billiard balls resembles music". Brandon Sun Saturday. 9 July 1988.
  15. ^ Eric McLean (16 January 1982). "Guitarist Laucke: Color Him Competitive". The Montreal Gazette. Archived from the original on 4 November 2016. Retrieved 29 April 2016.
  16. ^ Eric McLean (1 November 1986). "When Laucke plays the guitar, he means business". Montreal Gazette. Archived from the original on 4 November 2016. Retrieved 7 November 2015.
  17. ^ a b Joan Reinthaler (7 June 1971). "Fine Guitar at the Gallery". The Washington Post. Archived from the original on 29 June 2016. Retrieved 14 April 2016. I was one of the lucky ones with a seat up front because Laucke is one of the finest guitarists to have played in Washington in a long time... He projected the music rather than the virtuosity and to do so is the highest form of virtuosity. He commanded a world of expressiveness... He also brought an unerring sense of rhythmic timing and the nimble fingers necessary to produce beautifully even ornaments... Throughout the concert, Laucke's playing was a model of clarity, evenness, control and good sense
  18. ^ a b Ray Nelson (23 February 1977). "United States Senate Committee". Flickr – Photo Sharing!. Senate Committee on Rules and Administration. Archived from the original on 29 June 2016. Retrieved 6 April 2016. (Laucke) has been acclaimed in several concerts I have been instrumental in arranging for him in the Washington area. He has played at the National Gallery of art, the Corcoran Gallery and the Senate Office Building in programs sponsored by the United states Senate Staff Club last year when I was Club President.
  19. ^ * "Former Aide to Pell Killed in Washington". Boston Globe. Archived from the original on 6 March 2016. Retrieved 8 February 2016. Pell's former campaign manager and close friend Raymond Nelson, an openly gay man, was brutally murdered in Washington D.C in 1981 in a still unsolved murder. Pell spoke eloquently of his former aide on the Senate floor a day after his murder.
    • Nelson helped organize U.S. President Jimmy Carter's inauguration and dedicated a photo of the event to Laucke The photo's dedication Archived 14 April 2016 at the Wayback Machine says "To my Protege, Michael, from his mentor. 'And now Mr. President, say I do'… Ray Nelson.
  20. ^ a b François Bourgouin (21 June 2007). "Michael Laucke". The Canadian Encyclopedia. Anthony Wilson-Smith. Archived from the original on 2 November 2015.
  21. ^ a b Eric McLean (21 May 1988). "Guitarist Laucke bids temporary farewell to Montreal". Montreal Gazette. Archived from the original on 4 November 2016. Retrieved 20 April 2016. Early in his career, he delighted international visitors to Montreal's Olympic Games in a concert performance that was also transmitted live to a TV audience around the world.
  22. ^ François Bourgouin (21 June 2007). "Michael Laucke". The Canadian Encyclopedia. Archived from the original on 2 November 2015. Retrieved 30 October 2015.
  23. ^ Philippe Tétreau (18 May 1996). "Michael, le Magnifique" [Michael the Magnificent]. . Archived from the original on 4 November 2016. Retrieved 20 April 2016.
  24. ^ a b c Régis Tremblay (20 October 1990). "Au GTQ (Grand Théâtre du Québec): un fiesta flamenco avec Michael Laucke" [At the GTQ (Grand Théâtre du Québec) : a flamenco fiesta with Michael Laucke]. . Archived from the original on 4 November 2016. Retrieved 20 April 2016. M. Laucke joue le flamenco depuis qu'il est enfant, "mais je n'avais jamais osé le jouer en public. C'était quelque chose pour moi seul. Il y a une rencontre qui a changé ma vie: on m'a demandé si je pouvais accueillir un guitariste du nom de Paco de Lucía que je ne connaissais pas à l'époque. On a donné des concerts ensemble et je l'ai hébergé
  25. ^ a b Dominique Olivier (24 May 1990). "Good Laucke". Voir magazine. Archived from the original on 4 November 2016. Retrieved 20 April 2016. Faire de la musique et vivre aux côtés d'un tel être à donner à Laucke une tout autre vision de cette musique qui lui sembla auparavant trop facile pour quelqu'un qui avait suivi la formation classique. "Making music and living alongside such a being led Laucke to have a different view of this music that previously seemed too easy for someone who had a classical training background. His cohabitation with de Lucía led to a special and powerful musical exchange which Laucke continues to treasure." (English translation)
  26. ^ Eric McLean (21 May 1988). "Guitarist Laucke bids temporary farewell to Montreal". Montreal Gazette. Archived from the original on 4 November 2016. Retrieved 20 April 2016. Laucke was very much part of the jet set in New York of the 70s – a friend of Andy Warhol, Calvin Klein and Giorgio di Santangelo.
  27. ^ "SA spring collections: Fresh and wearable". Women's Wear Daily. 5 November 1976. The classical guitar played at Giorgio Sant'Angelo's collection set the pace for a more subdued Sant'Angelo--less hysterical but still idea-filled.
  28. ^ Myron Galloway (19 May 1990). "From Montreal's Waverly Street to a castle in Spain". The Suburban. During those years [the early 1970s] he was also taken up by New York's jet set. Through Peretti, he became friendly with … Andy Warhol, and designers Giorgio di Santangelo, Halston and Calvin Klein, and was frequently hired to play at the launching of their new lines.
  29. ^ John Plant (April 1980). "Trois des plus formidables virtuoses de Montreal: Entrevue avec Le Trio 3" [Three of the most formidable virtuosos in Montreal:Interview with Trio 3]. Virus Montreal.
  30. ^ "Michael Laucke: Classical and Flamenco Guitar". January 2007. Archived from the original on 20 February 2016. Retrieved 15 November 2015.
  31. ^ George Warren (April 1980). "Record Reviews". Guitar and Lute magazine. One of the best in recent years is Michael Laucke's oddly misnamed album "Transcription", (which contains nothing but original guitar works) on Radio Canada international 457; the material includes the Walton Bagatelles and the Bennett Impromptus, splendidly presented.
  32. ^ "SMCQ Concerts / 12th Season (1977–78) / Concerts / Concert 107 – SMCQ – World Premiere" [Quebec Contemporary Music Society]. SMCQ (Société de musique contemporaine du Québec). 4 May 1978. Archived from the original on 17 November 2015. Retrieved 18 October 2015.
  33. ^ Carl Urquhart (2 May 1988). "Yo-yo whiz masters all kinds of strings". The Montreal Daily News. Archived from the original on 4 November 2016. Retrieved 20 April 2016. Eight years ago, he invented a small, wooden fingerboard, with six strings stretched across a bridge. ...the eight-by-four-inch device can be plucked during long flights and in airport lobbies. Laucke gets some odd stares from passers-by, but those extra hours of finger exercises pay off in handsome performance dividends.
  34. ^ Michael Laucke; Riki Turofsky (March 1981). "Jade eyes". Toronto Public Library. Archived from the original on 17 November 2015. Retrieved 26 October 2015.
  35. ^ "Fiesta Flamenco – Michael Laucke et son groupe". Place des Arts, Montreal, Programme 1990. 25 May 1990. Archived from the original on 27 April 2016. Retrieved 27 May 2016.
  36. ^ "Fiesta Flamenco – Michael Laucke et son groupe". Place des Arts, Montreal, Programme 1991. 26 May 1991. Archived from the original on 27 April 2016. Retrieved 27 May 2016.
  37. ^ a b Dan Forte (1 July 1986). "Classical Guitar Instructional Video Series with Michael Laucke". Guitar Player magazine. Archived from the original on 4 November 2016. Retrieved 12 November 2015. (Laucke's) enthusiasm is infectious.
  38. ^ a b Mark Hanson (1 May 1987). "How to Play Classical Guitar by Michael Laucke". Frets Magazine. Archived from the original on 4 November 2016. ...thoughtful, and thorough instruction.
  39. ^ Pascale Bréniel (24 May 1988). "Michael Laucke sert deux maîtres à la fois, le classique et le flamenco" [Michael Laucke serves two masters at once, classical and flamenco]. La Presse. Archived from the original on 4 November 2016. Je crois que le classique procure une détente aux spectateurs, tandis que le flamenco est stimulant; Les deux s'équilibre, se complètent, soutient le guitariste [Michael Laucke] … Il n'y a pas d'interprètes de flamenco, car il est considéré comme quelque chose de très personnel... "Laucke maintains I believe that classical music relaxes and flamenco stimulates; both complement and complete each other. There are no flamenco interpreters because it is considered something very personal..." (English translation)
  40. ^ Régis Tremblay (20 October 1990). "Au GTQ (Grand Théâtre du Québec); une "Fiesta flamenco" avec Michael Laucke" [At GTQ (Grand Théâtre du Québec); a "Fiesta flamenco" with Michael Laucke]. Le Soleil. Archived from the original on 4 November 2016. Retrieved 20 April 2016. Puisque la guitare classique est limitée, on finit par chercher autre chose. Je faisais du flamenco, et je aime ça. Il y a plus de diverses techniques en flamenco; juste à la main droite, nous en avons 20.
  41. ^ Régis Tremblay (22 October 1994). "Michael Laucke, Star du Nouveau Flamenco" [Michael Laucke, Star of Nouveau Flamenco]. Le Soleil (Quebec). Archived from the original on 4 November 2016. Retrieved 20 April 2016. Je voudrais que le flamenco devienne le nouveau jazz!Le flamenco a tout ce qu'il faut pour suivre les traces du jazz et devenir un langage pour les gens de tous pays et de toutes cultures. On oublie qu'avant d'être un courrant mondial, le jazz n'était que le mode d'expression des Noirs de La Nouvelle-Orléans! Comme le jazz, le flamenco est basé sur l'improvisation et le dialogue entre instrumentistes. Le flamenco a même quelque chose en plus, puisque les joueurs dialoguent aussi avec les danseurs.
  42. ^ Eric McLean (21 May 1988). "Guitarist Laucke bids temporary farewell to Montreal". Montreal Gazette. Archived from the original on 4 November 2016. Retrieved 20 April 2016. It is Laucke's interest in flamenco that makes him special: He might be called the first interpreter of flamenco music
  43. ^ Eric McLean (5 May 1988). "Guitarist bids temporary farewell to Montreal". Montreal Gazette. Archived from the original on 4 November 2016. Retrieved 20 April 2016.
  44. ^ Billboard. Nielsen Business Media, Inc. 11 October 1997. p. 63. ISSN 0006-2510. Archived from the original on 17 May 2016.
  45. ^ País, Ediciones El (20 October 2014). "Paco de Lucía cuenta cómo compuso 'Entre dos aguas'". EL PAÍS (in Spanish). Archived from the original on 16 June 2016. Retrieved 20 June 2016. ...Entre dos aguas, "esa rumbita", como dice el maestro, que le dio popularidad y fama mundial inusual en un artista flamenco. "...this 'little rumba' which gave de Lucia world-wide fame, an unusual occurrence for a flamenco guitarist." (English translation)
  46. ^ Charles Abramovici (5 July 1989). ""Kid" woos audiences with musical prowess". The Beaconsfield Chronicle.
  47. ^ * Dominique Olivier (24 May 1990). "Good Laucke". Voir magazine. Archived from the original on 4 November 2016. Retrieved 20 April 2016. Faire de la musique et vivre aux côtés d'un tel être à donner à Laucke une tout autre vision de cette musique qui lui sembla auparavant trop facile pour quelqu'un qui avait suivi la formation classique. Cette cohabitation donna lieu... "Making music and living alongside such a being led Laucke to have a different view of this music that previously seemed too easy for someone who had a classical training background. His cohabitation with de Lucía led to a special and powerful musical exchange which Laucke continues to treasure. It is only this year (1990) that Laucke has managed to record works which de Lucía taught him. Laucke believes that: "For a guitarist, playing flamenco is most rewarding because this music is tailor-made for the guitar and allows the classical guitarist to move from one technique to another, although it is difficult." (English translation)
    • Pesia Portnoy (1 March 1989). "Encuentros 89 – El flamenco es su passion [flamenco is his passion]". Aurora (National Newspaper), Israel. Michael Laucke a dos grandes maestros: Andrés Segovia en guitarra classica y Paco de Lucía para el flamenco. Segovia no apreciaba el flamenco a la que veía como "música de taberna". Laucke no comparte esa opinión y habla de "obras de arte de compositores populares como Sabica y Paco de Lucía, que él ha incorporado a su repertorio en una forma un tanto particular. ...esa auténtica expresión de la música española. "Michael Laucke had, above all, two great masters‍—‌Segovia on the classical guitar and de Lucía in flamenco. Segovia did not appreciate flamenco, and he often referred to it as tavern music. Laucke does not share this opinion and speaks of works of art in the compositions of Sabicas and de Lucía which contain the hidden secrets of this original, pure form of Spanish music expression."(English translation)
  48. ^ a b Francisco Jose Vital (14 June 1996). "Michael Laucke da al Flamenco el Lugar que Merece" [Michael Laucke raises flamenco to the heights it deserves]. El Popular. Archived from the original on 6 August 2016. Retrieved 20 April 2016.
  49. ^ Dominique Olivier (24 May 1990). "Good Laucke". Voir magazine. Archived from the original on 4 November 2016. Retrieved 20 April 2016. C'est cette année seulement (1991) qu'il a réussi à enregistrer les pièces qui lui a transmises de Paco de Lucia. "It is only this year (1991) that Laucke has managed to record works which de Lucía taught him. Laucke believes that: 'For a guitarist, playing flamenco is most rewarding because this music is tailor-made for the guitar and allows the classical guitarist to move from one technique to another, although it is difficult.'" (English translation)
  50. ^ "Michael Laucke: Richesse flamenco" [Flamenco Richness]. Voir.ca (in French). 29 September 2005. Archived from the original on 17 November 2015. Retrieved 29 October 2015. C'est aussi très influencé par mon background en classique. Donc, c'est un flamenco plus smooth
  51. ^ Michael Laucke (2001). Flamenco Road (enhancedCD). Michael Laucke. Montreal: Justin Time Records. p. 3. Jacket Notes: The recording took place in five different studios in Montreal, each chosen for its particular acoustics. The 24 tracks employ; 5 guitars (flamenco, Spanish, classical and electric guitars), a rhythm section consisting of bongos, 4 congas and a rock drum set blended with other percs such as claves, maracas and castanets, 3 dancers performing typical "palmas" (hand-clapping) in synchronization, 3 trumpets, 3 pianos and a "country-style" violinist.
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  55. ^ Billie Eaves (2011). "The Reception of Erik Satie's Gymnopédies: Audience, Identity, and Commercialization". etd.ohiolink.edu. The Ohio State University. Archived from the original on 21 November 2015.
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  58. ^ Michael Laucke (2001). Flamenco Road (enhancedCD). Michael Laucke. Montreal: Justin Time Records. p. 3. My arrangements of the "Three Gymnopedies" comprise ALL the notes of the original piano versions: a most complex process since all the piano sounds must fit comfortably, or uncomfortably, onto the six strings of the guitar. Nevertheless, the present recording is done as it is in concert, on one classical guitar, without overdubbing. My tempo is a little quicker than when the pieces are played on the piano, due to the shorter resonance time of notes played on the Spanish guitar. Now and then, I use a "vibrato" and slides, which, of course, can't be done on the piano but which add warmth of expression to this undeniably charming, exotic and mystic music.
  59. ^ Michael Laucke (24 June 1979). The Michael Laucke series – Three Gymnopédies / Trois Gymnopédies. Waterloo, Ontario, Canada: Waterloo Music Publishing Company. p. 3.
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  62. ^ a b c Myron Galloway (13 March 1991). "Guitarist Michael Laucke brilliant in debut performance". The Suburban. Archived from the original on 29 June 2016. Retrieved 14 April 2016. Laucke's solo playing was no less than brilliant
  63. ^ François Morel (27 February 1977). Letter from Canadian composer François Morel. Archived from the original on 20 February 2016.
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  65. ^ a b Bob Gilmore (1 June 2014). Claude Vivier: A Composer's Life. Library of Congress Cataloging-in-Publication Data: University of Rochester Press. p. 266. ISBN 978-1-58046-485-7. Archived from the original on 15 November 2017. Retrieved 24 October 2015.
  66. ^ Caral Urquhart (2 May 1988). "Yo-yo whiz masters all kinds of strings". The Montreal Daily News. No fewer that 25 Canadian composers, including Claude Vivier, John Rea, Francois Morel, Walter Boudreau and Michel-Georges Bregent have composed works expressly for his talents.The guitarist has record each of the works....
  67. ^ Claude Gingras (16 November 1984). "Les sons délicats de la musique actuelle" [The delicate sounds of modern music]. . Archived from the original on 29 June 2016. Retrieved 14 April 2016. Elle (la pièce pour guitare seule de Jean Papineau-Couture) a d'ailleurs un interprète on ne peut plus convaincant en Michael Laucke, qui lui a accordé assez de respect pour la mémoriser. Si tous les guitaristes étaient aussi musiciens que Laucke, la guitare aurait meilleure réputation! … [It (the solo guitar work by Jean Papineau Couture) has furthermore found in Michael Laucke an interpreter who couldn't be more convincing... If all guitarists played as musically as Laucke, the guitar would have a better reputation!]
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  69. ^ Carl Urquhart (21 May 1988). "Classical guitarist has flair for flamenco". Montreal Daily News. p. 27. Last year, he played 238 concerts, ...there are limits even for someone of his voracious musical appetite.
  70. ^ Bill Brownstein (14 July 1991). "It's all in the hands". Montreal Gazette. he gives about 150 concerts a year and has performed in 25 countries, often in front of some very important royal and politico types.
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  72. ^ Chris Dell (17 September 1983). "The Old Malthouse Music Society, Sawbridgeworth". Classical Guitar. Archived from the original on 8 November 2015. Retrieved 12 November 2015. His stage presentation and his demeanor are near perfect..."Who could ask for anything more?"
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  75. ^ * Lajos Nagy (17 August 1983). "Kanada Premier Gitáros" [Canada's Premier Guitarist]. The Workers' Paper (in Hungarian).
    • Wei Heng (27 July 1988). "Michael Laucke in Concert". New Evening Post (Beijing, China). ...excellent skill and perfect musical expression. ...the concert was impressive and the music beautiful and flamboyant.
    • Yosi Vanono (23 March 1989). "Canadian Flamenco". Al-Hamishmar (The Daily Guardian). Laucke is a musician from Canada who plays flamenco with the heat, excitement and feeling of someone who has just descended from the hills of Andalusia.
    • "India Tour Program 1988, August 1, 1988 (Under the auspices of the Canadian Government)". 1 August 1988. Archived from the original on 20 February 2016. Retrieved 7 November 2015.
    • Dev Anan (10 August 1988). "Masterly Guitar Recital". The Afternoon Despatch and Courier. The music and the engrossing rhythmic élan of the playing had an intoxicating effect. Laucke's own 'Solitude' was most exquisite.
    • Eric McLean (21 May 1988). "Guitarist Laucke bids temporary farewell to Montreal". Montreal Gazette. Archived from the original on 4 November 2016. Retrieved 20 April 2016. After that, Laucke travels to Pakistan, where he will meet Pakistani president Mohammad Zia-Ul-Haq. He will perform concerts in Lahore, Islamabad and Karachi before travelling to India for concerts in Bombay and New Delhi.
    • David Oancia (27 May 1993). "Classical Music – Montreal-born classical guitarist Michael Laucke enjoys his globe-trotting musical lifestye". Hour Montreal. ...Laucke toured the world playing such places as India, Morocco, Israel, China (including a performance on the Great Wall of China) and various Eastern countries (before and after the fall of communism.)
  76. ^ Vera Ambasiadis (18 May 1996). "Michael Laucke Poster from 1996 season at Place des arts". "Fiesta Flamenco" poster. Archived from the original on 21 February 2016.
  77. ^ Régis Tremblay (28 October 1990). "Michael Laucke : jouer pour faire aimer la guitare... (Michael Laucke makes one fall in love with the guitar.)". . Archived from the original on 29 June 2016. Retrieved 14 April 2016. Il joue comme par reflexe, comme il respire. Plus qu'un virtuose, Michael Laucke est un talent pur, par qui le charisme arrive! ...irresistible, ce Michael Laucke. "More than a virtuoso, charismatic Michael Laucke is pure talent! For him playing is instinctive, just like breathing ...irresistible Michael Laucke." (English translation)
  78. ^ Norman Ruiz (4 November 1985). "Michael Laucke Performs in Preston Bradley Hall – Chicago". Guitarra magazine. Archived from the original on 29 June 2016. Retrieved 14 April 2016. His relaxed manner, beaming smile and gracious speaking voice won the hearts of the audience before he even played a note. Laucke has the ability to communicate his great love for the music he plays, both in the music itself and in his stage manner – unimposing, expressive and always submissive to the message of the music.
  79. ^ Joan Reinthaler (31 December 1979). "Michael Laucke". The Washington Post. Archived from the original on 18 November 2015. Retrieved 12 November 2015. Going to one of these concerts is a little like eaves-dropping, and when the performance is as good as Michael Laucke's was at the National Gallery last night, it is worth the effort.
  80. ^ Nancy Louden (15 April 2004). Minutes of MAC AIDS FUND Board meeting when Michael Laucke was one of the directors. Flickr – Photo Sharing! (Report). MAC AIDS FUND. Archived from the original on 29 June 2016. Retrieved 6 April 2016.
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  82. ^ Alan Farley (21 October 2004). Michael Laucke in Interview (GuitarFest in St Trinity Church). KALW Radio (Berkeley, California). So, for this film with Rory Kennedy (Pandemic:FACING aids), since we (MAF) give away 3 to 4 million a year, we couldn't afford to finance the whole film. So we contacted the Gates foundation and the financing came through, based on Rory's credibility. ...we lost title sponsorship. It (a showing) took place at the United Nations in that room with the name tags of each country on the seats. ...and later that month all of us (all the directors) were convened at the United Nations again to receive an award from Kofi Anan. ...Danny Glover was there, Elton (John) wasn't... It was amazingly successful, but of course so sad. Of the 5 countries portrayed in the film, only the wealthier countries did ok, and people survived.
  83. ^ Patrice Roy (2 September 2015). Le Téléjournal 18h. Radio-Canada. Archived from the original on 15 November 2017. Retrieved 12 November 2015. Le guitariste virtuose Michael Laucke a été nominé pour l'Ordre du Canada. Nous ne saurons pas s'il gagne jusqu'au début de 2016, mais nous lui souhaitons bonne chance! Il le mérite!
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  91. ^ Andrew Culver (29 May 1979). "McGill wins recording prize". Montreal Star. The best recorded performance of a Canadian work was the guitarist Michael Laucke... which also took top honors in the jazz recording category for Jazz Canada Montreux 1978.
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  107. ^ Claude Gingras (Summer 1980). "In Review". MusiCanada. Michael Laucke's admirable repertoire of contemporary works written especially for guitar is certainly praiseworthy, as are the performers' technique and sensitivity. The recording has already been awarded a Grand Prix du Disque-Canada.
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  110. ^ Eric McLean (6 June 1987). "Maestro Segovia and the guitar: an inseparable duo". Montreal Gazette. To the best of my knowledge, his only Canadian pupil was the Montrealer Michael Laucke, who studied with him in Los Angeles and New York.
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  112. ^ Peter Gzowski (8 February 1985). Morningside. CBC Radio. We welcome Michael Laucke about whom we are going to learn a lot over the next 5 days. He's rapidly becoming one of the significant guitarists in the concert world. He's involved in so many kinds of music and musical projects that it's hard to find a place to start. Over the next couple of days we are going to feature some of the mucial areas that he explores.
  113. ^ Attaingnant, Pierre; Laucke, Michael; Le Roy, Adrian, eds. (1 January 1985). Music for Jacques Cartier: performer's edition of four works by Pierre Attaignant (1494–1552) and Adrien LeRoy (1520–1598). Michael Laucke series for classical guitar (in English and French). Waterloo, Ont: Waterloo Music.
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