Manush Myftiu

Manush Myftiu (January 16, 1919 – October 20, 1997) was an Albanian politician during the country's socialist period. He served in a number of positions, most recently as the deputy prime minister.

Manush Myftiu
Manush Myftiu (portret).jpeg
Deputy Prime Minister of Albania
In office
12 November 1976 – 7 July 1990
Prime MinisterMehmet Shehu
Adil Çarçani
In office
5 March 1951 – 11 April 1952
Prime MinisterEnver Hoxha
Member of the Politboro
In office
1956–1990
Chair of the PresidiumHaxhi Lleshi (1956-1982)
Ramiz Alia (1982-1990)
Minister of Education of Albania
In office
22 June 1958 – 22 June 1965
Preceded byRamiz Alia
Succeeded byThoma Deliana
Minister of Health of Albania
In office
4 June 1956 – 4 February 1958
Preceded byIbrahim Dervishi
Succeeded byTaqi Skëndi
Deputy Minister of Foreign Affairs
In office
May 1950 – April 1951
Prime MinisterEnver Hoxha
Foreign MinisterEnver Hoxha
Chairperson of the People's Assembly of Albania
In office
1947–1949
Preceded byYmer Dishnica
Succeeded byGogo Nushi
Personal details
Born16 January 1919
Vlora, Principality of Albania
Died20 October 1997(1997-10-20) (aged 78)
Political partyParty of Labour of Albania
Signature

Early lifeEdit

Myftiu was born in Vlora to a family of Albanian Muslim landowners. In 1939 he graduated from a Classical Lycée in Rome and while in his hometown joined a communist cell. From 1940 to 1941 he studied at the Medical Faculty of the University of Turin but did not complete his studies, returning to Vlora where he was obliged to join the Albanian Fascist Youth. While a member of it he simultaneously remained a member of a communist cell, carrying out clandestine activities against fascism and becoming a member of the Communist Party of Albania (from 1948 the Party of Labour of Albania) after it was founded. During the war he became Commissar of the Fifth Partisan Brigade, commissar of the First Combat Division, and was attached to the Fifth and Eighth Brigades of the First Army Corps.

During the war he served as a member of the Vlora District Party Committee.

Political careerEdit

After the war, Myftiu was active in the Communist political structure and became a protégé of Mehmet Shehu.[1] From 1947 to 1949, he served as Chair of the People's Assembly of Albania.[1] He then served as Minister without portfolio from 1949 to 1950.

In November 1948, he became a member of the central committee of the Party of Labour of Albania.[1] He remained a member of the central committee until it was disbanded when the party transitioned into the Socialist Party of Albania.[1]

From May 1950 to April 1951, he served as Deputy Minister of Foreign Affairs.[1]

On 4 July 1950, Myftiu was appointed President of the Control Commission.[2] He served in this position until 5 March 1951, replaced by Mehmet Shehu.[3]

On 5 March 1951, Myftiu was made a vice-premier and replaced Manol Konomi as the Minister of Justice as part of a series of changes to the cabinet.[3] He held this post until 6 September 1951, when he was dismissed and replaced by Bilbil Klosi as part of a cabinet reshuffle.[4]

On 11 April 1952, it was announced that Myftiu was dismissed as vice-premier.[5] On 12 July 1954, following a reorganization of the Party of Labour of Albania, Myftiu and Josif Pashko were replaced in their party posts by Gogo Nushi and Liri Belishova.[6] On 20 July 1954, Myftiu became vice-premier once again.[7]

He became a candidate member of the Politburo in 1952, and a full member of the Politburo from 1956 to 1990.

From 1956 to 1958, Myftiu served as Minister of Health.[1] From 1958 to 1965, he served as Minister of Education.[1]

From 1966 to 1976, he was First Secretary of the Tirana District Party Committee.[1] From 1976 to 1990, he served as deputy prime minister.[1]

Later lifeEdit

On 2 July 1994, Myftiu was sentenced to five years in prison on the charge of abusing his powers during his time in office, but was released on account of his advanced age.[1]

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ a b c d e f g h i j Elsie, Robert (2013). A Biographical Dictionary of Albanian History. New York: I.B. Tauris. p. 324. ISBN 978-1-78076-431-3.
  2. ^ Pearson, Owen (2006). Albania as Dictatorship and Democracy: From Isolation to the Kosovo War, 1946-1998. New York: I.B. Tauris. p. 403-04. ISBN 1-84511-105-2.
  3. ^ a b Pearson, Owen (2006). Albania as Dictatorship and Democracy: From Isolation to the Kosovo War, 1946-1998. New York: I.B. Tauris. p. 422. ISBN 1-84511-105-2.
  4. ^ Pearson, Owen (2006). Albania as Dictatorship and Democracy: From Isolation to the Kosovo War, 1946-1998. New York: I.B. Tauris. p. 432. ISBN 1-84511-105-2.
  5. ^ Pearson, Owen (2006). Albania as Dictatorship and Democracy: From Isolation to the Kosovo War, 1946-1998. New York: I.B. Tauris. p. 445. ISBN 1-84511-105-2.
  6. ^ Pearson, Owen (2006). Albania as Dictatorship and Democracy: From Isolation to the Kosovo War, 1946-1998. New York: I.B. Tauris. p. 482. ISBN 1-84511-105-2.
  7. ^ Pearson, Owen (2006). Albania as Dictatorship and Democracy: From Isolation to the Kosovo War, 1946-1998. New York: I.B. Tauris. p. 483. ISBN 1-84511-105-2.

Additional ReferencesEdit

  • Elsie, Robert. A Biographical Dictionary of Albanian History. London: I.B. Tauris. 2012. p. 324.
  • Skendi, Stavro (ed). Albania. New York: Frederick A. Praeger. 1956. pp. 334–335.