List of U.S. Highways in Arizona

The U.S Highways in Arizona are the segments of the United States Numbered Highways that run within the U.S. state of Arizona.

United States Numbered Highways of the Arizona State Highway System
U.S. Route 60 markerU.S. Route 191 marker
Example signage from Arizona's U.S. Highways
U.S. Highways highlighted in red
System information
Maintained by ADOT and local jurisdictions
Length2,060.22 mi[1] (3,315.60 km)
Includes overlaps with Interstates and State Routes
FormedNovember 11, 1926 (by AASHO)
September 9, 1927 (by Arizona)
Highway names
InterstatesInterstate X (I-X)
US HighwaysU.S. Route X (US X)
StateState Route X (SR X)
System links
  • Arizona State Highway System

HistoryEdit

The United States Numbered Highway System (U.S. Highway System) was originally approved by the American Association of State Highway Officials (AASHO) with assistance by the United States Department of Agriculture Joint Board on Interstate Highways on November 11, 1926.[2] The Arizona State Highway Department (ASHD) formally recognized the U.S. Highways on September 9, 1927, during the establishment of the Arizona State Highway System.[3] When the U.S. Highways within Arizona were first being planned, the proposed routes consisted of U.S. Route 60 (US 60) from Topock to Lupton, US 70 from Holbrook to New Mexico, US 80 from Yuma to New Mexico, US 89 from Flagstaff to Utah, US 91 from Nevada to Utah through the Arizona Strip, US 180 from Florence Junction to New Mexico, US 280 from Ash Fork to Phoenix and US 380 from Tucson to Nogales.[4] When the system was commissioned however, noticeable changes had been made. US 60 had been renumbered to US 66 and US 280 and US 380 became a southern extension of US 89. This also meant US 89 shared a long concurrency with US 80 between Phoenix and Tucson, as well as a wrong-way concurrency with US 66 between Flagstaff and Ash Fork.[5]

In 1931, US 70 became the first U.S. Highway to be decommissioned in Arizona. It was replaced by US 60 between Springerville and New Mexico, and by a newly commissioned highway designated US 260 between Holbrook and Springerville. US 60 had also been established over other existing state highways from Ehrenberg to Springerville, creating a concurrency with US 80 and US 89 between Phoenix and Florence Junction.[6] US 70 was given a new routing between Clovis and El Paso, Texas via Alamogordo, New Mexico.[7] US 180 was re-designated as part of a new extension of US 70 through Arizona in 1935.[8] US 70 also ran entirely concurrent with US 60 from Ehrenberg to Globe.[9] 1935 was also the year US 466 and US 93 were extended southeast from Nevada to Kingman, by way of the recently completed Boulder Dam (now Hoover Dam). Both US 93 and US 466 were entirely concurrent with each other in Arizona.[10] By 1939, US 666 had been extended south into Arizona, at a terminus with US 80 in Douglas. US 666 was concurrent with US 66 between Lupton and Sanders, US 260 from St. Johns to Alpine and US 70 between San Jose and Safford. By this time, US 260 had also been extended southeast to New Mexico.[11] In 1941, an alternate route of US 89 known as US 89A had been established over former State Route 79 (SR 79) between Prescott and Flagstaff, via Jerome and Sedona.[12]

Following the end of the Second World War, traffic had greatly increased on the U.S. Highway System throughout the country, resulting in an increase of traffic accidents and rough road conditions. These factors would contribute to the Federal Aid Highway Act of 1956, which established the Interstate and Defense Highway System (which are often referred to as "Interstates" for short) was established. This new network of nationwide freeways was slated to replace the heaviest traveled U.S. Highways and state highways in the country. Five Interstates were planned in Arizona to supplant or bypass existing U.S. Highways. US 60 between Ehrenberg and Phoenix was to be replaced by the western section of the newly planned Interstate 10 (I-10), I-8 and the eastern section of I-10 were to bypass or replace the entirety of US 80, I-40 was to replace the entirety of US 66, I-17 and I-19 were to replace parts of US 89 and I-15 was to replace all of US 91. Construction of the Interstate Highway system was well underway by 1957.[13]

Despite the introduction of the Interstates, attention was still paid to designating new U.S. Highways or altering the routes of existing examples. In 1959, US 89 between Utah and Bitter Springs was moved onto a new route through Page over the Glen Canyon Dam. The older route between Utah and Bitter Springs became a northern extension of US 89A.[14] In 1960, the southern section of SR 95 between Quartzsite and San Luis was re-designated as an extension of US 95. The remainder of US 95 in Arizona was concurrent with US 60 (future I-10) between Ehrenberg and Quartzsite.[15] By 1963, US 260 had been decommissioned and made into a western extension of US 180. US 180 was also extended over US 66 from Holbrook to Flagstaff and replaced SR 164 between Flagstaff and Valle.[16][17] In 1965, sections of SR 64 and SR 364 between US 89 and Four Corners were designated as part of the new US 164. US 164 was also concurrent with US 89 between former SR 64 and US 66 in Flagstaff.[18]

ListEdit

Historical U.S. Highway Markers Used in Arizona
1926 to 1956
1956 to 1960 (Northbound)
1956 to 1960 (Eastbound)
1956 to 1960 (Southbound)
1956 to 1960 (Westbound)
1960 to 1963 (Northbound)
1960 to 1963 (Eastbound)
1960 to 1963 (Southbound)
1960 to 1963 (Westbound)
1963 to 1991
1991 to Present
Number Length (mi)[1][19][20] Length (km) Southern or western terminus Northern or eastern terminus Formed Removed Notes
  US 60 369.31 594.35 I-10 at Brenda US 60 at New Mexico state line 01932-01-011932 current Formerly ran to California state line near Ehrenberg; this has been replaced by I-10.
  US 64 4.14 6.66 US 160 US 64 at New Mexico state line 01989-01-011989 current
  US 66 332 534 US 66 at Topock US 66 near Lupton 01926-01-011926 01985-01-011985 Replaced by I-40 and SR 66; designated as a Historic Route and National Scenic Byway state-wide.[21]
  US 70 107.5[22] 173.0 US 70 at New Mexico state line US 66 at Holbrook 01926-01-011926 01932-01-011932 Replaced by US 60 and US 260
  US 70 122.08 196.47 US 60 US 70 at New Mexico state line 01935-01-011935 current Ran concurrently with US 60 to California border near Ehrenberg until 1969.[23]
  US 80 486 782 US 80 at Yuma US 80 at New Mexico state line 01926-01-011926 01989-01-011989 Replaced by I-8 and I-10. Remaining route became SR 80. Designated as a Historic Route state-wide.[24]
  US 87 Proposed US 87 at New Mexico state line Proposed US 87W/US 87E near Elfrida (First proposal)
US 80 in Douglas (Second proposal)
Proposed twice in 1934 and 1943, but never commissioned
  US 87E Proposed US 87/US 87W near Elfrida US 80 in Douglas Proposed, but never commissioned
  US 87W Proposed US 87/US 87E near Elfrida US 89 in Nogales Proposed, but never commissioned
  US 89 137.85 221.85 I-40 BL / US 180 at Flagstaff US-89 at Utah state line 01926-01-011926 current Historically ended in Nogales
  US 89A 86.90 139.85 US 89 US-89A at Utah state line 01960-01-011960 current Old routing of US 89
  US 89A 88 142 US 89 at Prescott US 89/I-40 BL at Flagstaff 01941-01-011941 01993-01-011993 Became SR 89A. Designated a Historic Route from Jerome to Cottonwood.[21]
  US 91 15 24 US-91 at Utah state line US 91 at Nevada state line 01926-01-011926 01974-01-011974 Replaced by I-15 and Mohave County Route 91.
  US 93 199.38 320.87 US 60 at Wickenburg US 93 at Nevada state line 01935-01-011935 current
  US 95 123.36 198.53 Fed. 2 at the Mexican Border at San Luis, AZ I-10 / US 95 at California state line 01960-01-011960 current Formerly SR 95
  US 160 159.35 256.45 US 89 US 160 at New Mexico state line 01970-01-011970 current Formerly SR 64 and SR 164
  US 163 23.21 37.35 US 160 US-163 at Utah state line 01970-01-011970 current
  US 164 US 66 / US 180 / US 89 in Flagstaff US 164 at New Mexico state line 01964-01-011964 01970-01-011970 Replaced by US 160
  US 180 170.8 274.9 US 60 / US 80 / US 89 in Florence US 180 near Franklin 01926-01-011926 01935-01-011935 Replaced completely by US 70 on June 17, 1935.[8]
  US 180 287.77 463.12 Grand Canyon National Park US 180 at New Mexico state line 01961-01-011961 current ADOT signs west end at SR 64 in Valle
  US 191 516.50 831.23 SR 80 at Douglas US-191 at Utah state line 01982-01-011982 current Formerly SR 63 and US 666
  US 193 US 93 in Sacaton US 93 in Picacho Proposed, but never commissioned as a U.S. Highway.
  US 260 283 455 Holbrook, AZ Deming, NM 01931-01-011931 01962-01-011962 Now part of US 180
  US 466 73 117 US 93 / US 466 at Nevada state line US 66 at Kingman 01935-01-011935 01969-01-011969 Now US 93
  US 666 384 618 I-40 / US 666 at New Mexico state line SR 80 at Douglas 01938-01-011938 01991-01-011991 Now US 191
  US 789 Fed. 15 in Nogales US 66/US 666/Proposed US 789 at New Mexico state line Proposed, but never commissioned as a U.S. Highway. Designation only existed as SR 789.
  •       Former

Special routesEdit

Number Length (mi)[1] Length (km) Southern or western terminus Northern or eastern terminus Formed Removed Notes
 
  US 80 Bus.
US 80 in Winterhaven, CA US 80 in Yuma, AZ 01957-01-01c. 1957 01976-01-01c. 1976 Handed over to the city of Yuma.
  
  US 80A
US 80 in Phoenix US 80 in Phoenix Handed over to the city of Phoenix. Exact dates of existence unknown.
US 80A Washington Street in Phoenix US 60/US 70/US 80/US 89 near Tempe 01930-01-011930 01961-01-011961 Handed over to the city of Phoenix. Was most likely never signed.
 
  US 80 Truck
US 80 in Tombstone US 80 in Tombstone 01955-01-01c. 1955 01964-01-01c. 1964 Replaced by US 80 (later SR 80).
 
  US 89T
43.58 70.14 US 89 at The Gap SR 98 in Page 02013-01-012013 02015-01-012015 Temporary route while US 89 was undergoing repairs. Replaced by Navajo Route 20.
US 93 Spur 0.29 0.47 I-40/US 93 in Kingman Historic Route 66 in Kingman 02009-01-012009 current Signed as Historic US 66.
 
  US 95 Truck
0.45 0.72 Fed. 2 at the Mexican Border in San Luis US 95 in San Luis 01984-01-011984 02015-01-012015 Replaced by northbound US 95.
   
  US 191 Bus.
1.15 1.85 Fed. 2 at the Mexican Border in Douglas SR 80 in Douglas 01991-01-011991 current Former US 666 Bus.
   
  US 666 Bus.
1.15 1.85 Fed. 2 at the Mexican Border in Douglas SR 80 in Douglas 01991-01-011991 Replaced by US 191 Bus.
  •       Former

Historic routesEdit

These are historic U.S. Highways recognized by the ADOT Parkways, Historic and Scenic Roads Program.[21][25]

Number Length (mi) Length (km) Southern or western terminus Northern or eastern terminus Formed Removed Notes
  Historic US 66 204.14[26] 328.53 I-40 in Topock I-40 in Holbrook 01987-01-011987 current Sections of former US 66. Discontinuous sections connected by I-40.
  Historic US 80 398.54[27] 641.39 I-8 Business (Historic US 80) at the California state line in Yuma NM 80 at the New Mexico state line 02018-01-012018 current Sections of former US 80. Discontinuous sections connected by I-8 and I-10.
  Historic US 89A 9.99[28] 16.08 SR 89A in Jerome SR 89A in Cottonwood 01992-01-011992 current Sections of former US 89A.

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ a b c Staff. "2013 ADOT Highway Log" (PDF). Arizona Department of Transportation. Retrieved September 22, 2019.
  2. ^ Bureau of Public Roads & American Association of State Highway Officials (November 11, 1926). United States System of Highways Adopted for Uniform Marking by the American Association of State Highway Officials (Map). 1:7,000,000. Washington, DC: U.S. Geological Survey. OCLC 32889555. Retrieved November 7, 2013 – via Wikimedia Commons.
  3. ^ Arizona State Highway Department and United States Public Roads Administration (June 1939). "History of the Arizona State HIghway Department" (PDF) (Historic Record). Retrieved July 24, 2019 – via Arizona Memory Project.CS1 maint: uses authors parameter (link)
  4. ^ Arizona State Highway Department (1926). Map of Arizona (Map). 1:1,267,200. Cartography by E.W. Miller. Arizona Department of Transportation. Retrieved October 28, 2019 – via AARoads.
  5. ^ Arizona State Highway Department (1927). Arizona State Highway Commission Official State Routes and State Highways of the State of Arizona (Map). 1:1,267,200. Cartography by W.B. Land. Arizona Department of Transportation. Retrieved October 28, 2019 – via AARoads.
  6. ^ Weingroff, Richard (June 18, 2003). "U.S. Route 666: "Beast of a Highway"?". Federal Highway Administration. Retrieved August 3, 2019.
  7. ^ "Alamogordo To Be On No. 70 Transcontinental Highway". Alamogordo News. Roswell Record. July 2, 1931. p. 1. Retrieved July 25, 2019 – via Newspapers.com.
  8. ^ a b Arizona State Highway Department (June 17, 1935). "ADOT Right-of-Way Resolution 1935-P-300". Retrieved October 15, 2019 – via Arizona Highway Data. Re-designate all of S.R. 180 across Arizona as U.S. 70 from Duncan to Ehrenberg only
  9. ^ "Highway 70 is Routed via Phoenix". Arizona Daily Star. November 5, 1935. p. 3. Retrieved August 1, 2019 – via Newspapers.com.
  10. ^ Weingroff, Richard (17 October 2013). "U.S. 93 Reaching For The Border". General Highway History. Federal Highway Administration. Retrieved 4 June 2015.
  11. ^ Arizona State Highway Department (1939). State Highway Department Road Map of Arizona (Map). 1:1,267,200. Cartography by W.M. DeMerse. Arizona Department of Transportation. Retrieved October 28, 2019 – via AARoads.
  12. ^ Arizona State Highway Department (1941). State Highway Department Road Map of Arizona (Map). 1:1,267,200. Cartography by W.M. DeMerse. Arizona Department of Transportation. Retrieved October 28, 2019 – via AARoads.
  13. ^ Pry, Mark; Andersen, Fred (December 2011). "Arizona Transportation History" (PDF) (Technical report). Arizona Department of Transportation. Retrieved August 24, 2018.
  14. ^ Arizona State Highway Department (April 14, 1959). "ADOT Right-of-Way Resolution 1959-P-121". Retrieved October 29, 2019 – via Arizona Highway Data. Renumber & redesignate S.R. 189 to U.S. 89 from Bitter Springs northeast to Kanab via Glen Canyon.; Renumber & redesignate U.S. 89 to U.S. 89A from Bitter Springs northwest to Kanab via Jacob Lake & Fredonia.
  15. ^ Weingroff, Richard (June 27, 2017). "U.S. 95 and Idaho's North and South Highway". Federal Highway Administration. Retrieved August 1, 2019.
  16. ^ Rand McNally & Co. (1961). State Highway Department Road Map of Arizona (Map). 1:1,520,640. Arizona State Highway Department. Retrieved October 29, 2019 – via Arizona Roads.
  17. ^ Rand McNally & Co. (1963). State Highway Department Road Map of Arizona (Map). 1:1,584,640. Arizona State Highway Department. Retrieved October 29, 2019 – via AARoads.
  18. ^ Arizona State Highway Department (September 29, 1965). "ADOT Right-of-Way Resolution 1965-P-078". Retrieved October 29, 2019 – via Arizona Highway Data. Assign U.S. Highway No. to U.S. 89, S.R. 64 & S.R. 364 from 7 miles east of Flagstaff to New Mexico State Line south of Four Corners.
  19. ^ W.M. DeMerse (1935). Road Map of Arizona (Map). Arizona State Highway Department. Retrieved May 6, 2015 – via AARoads.
  20. ^ Road Map of Arizona (Map). Arizona Highway Department. 1971. Retrieved May 6, 2015 – via AARoads.
  21. ^ a b c Arizona Department of Transportation (2014). "Arizona Parkways, Historic and Scenic Roads" (PDF). Phoenix: Arizona Department of Transportation. Retrieved September 11, 2018.
  22. ^ Keane, Melissa; Brides, J. Simon (May 2003). "Good Roads Everywhere" (PDF). Cultural Resource Report Report. Arizona Department of Transportation. Retrieved August 25, 2018.
  23. ^ Sanderson, Dale. "End Of US Highway 70". Archived from the original on 2 April 2015. Retrieved 18 March 2015.
  24. ^ Davis, Shaq (2018-09-21). "Arizona's portion of U.S. Route 80, opened in 1926, wins 'Historic Road' status". Arizona Daily Star. Tucson, Arizona: Tucson.com. Retrieved 2018-09-21.
  25. ^ "Arizona Scenic Roads Map" (PDF). Phoenix, Arizona: Arizona Department of Transportation. Retrieved 2018-09-12.
  26. ^ Google (July 25, 2019). "Historic Route 66 in Arizona" (Map). Google Maps. Google. Retrieved July 25, 2019.
  27. ^ Google (23 July 2019). "Historic US 80 in Arizona" (Map). Google Maps. Google. Retrieved 23 July 2019.
  28. ^ Google (23 July 2019). "Historic US 89A in Arizona" (Map). Google Maps. Google. Retrieved 23 July 2019.

External linksEdit