List of Canadian conservative leaders

This is a list of federal leaders after Confederation who were members of federal conservative parties.

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Tory leaders since ConfederationEdit

This a list of leaders of the Conservative Party of Canada (historical) (1867–1942), Progressive Conservative Party of Canada (1942–2003), and Conservative Party of Canada (2003–present) ("the Tory parties"), and of prime ministers of Canada after Confederation who were members of those parties.

Conservative (1867-1942)Edit

Name From To Riding as leader Notes
  Sir John A. Macdonald July 1, 1867 June 6, 1891 Kingston, ON (1867–18, 1887–91);
Victoria, BC (1878–82);
Carleton, ON (1882–88)
1st Prime Minister
  Sir John Abbott June 16, 1891 November 24, 1892 Senator for Inkerman, QC 3rd Prime Minister
  Sir John Sparrow David Thompson December 5, 1892 December 12, 1894 Antigonish, NS 4th Prime Minister
  Sir Mackenzie Bowell December 21, 1894 April 27, 1896 Senator for Hastings, ON 5th Prime Minister
  Sir Charles Tupper May 1, 1896 February 6, 1901 Cape Breton, NS 6th Prime Minister
  Sir Robert Laird Borden February 6, 1901 July 10, 1920 Halifax, NS (1900–04, 1908–17);
Carleton, ON (1905–08);
Kings, NS (1917–21)
8th Prime Minister
  Arthur Meighen July 10, 1920 September 24, 1926 Portage la Prairie, MB (1908–21, 1925–26);
Grenville, ON (1922–25)
9th Prime Minister
  Hugh Guthrie (interim leader) October 11, 1926 October 12, 1927 Wellington South
  R. B. Bennett October 12, 1927 July 7, 1938 Calgary West, AB 11th Prime Minister
  Robert Manion July 7, 1938 May 14, 1940 London, ON Resigned after lost seat in 1940 election
  Richard Hanson (interim leader) May 14, 1940 November 12, 1941 York—Sunbury, NB
  Arthur Meighen November 12, 1941 December 9, 1942 Senator for St. Marys, Ontario Resigned after defeat in attempt to enter House of Commons via York South by-election

Progressive Conservative Party of Canada (1942-2003)Edit

Picture Name Term start Term end Riding as leader Notes
  John Bracken December 11, 1942 July 20, 1948 Neepawa Former Premier of Manitoba
  George Drew October 2, 1948 November 29, 1956 Carleton Former Premier of Ontario
William Earl Rowe November 29, 1956 (Interim) December 14, 1956 Dufferin—Simcoe Interim leader until 1956 leadership convention
  John Diefenbaker December 14, 1956 September 9, 1967 Prince Albert 13th Prime Minister of Canada
Robert Stanfield September 9, 1967 February 22, 1976 Halifax Former Premier of Nova Scotia
  Joe Clark February 22, 1976 February 19, 1983 Rocky Mountain, Yellowhead 16th Prime Minister of Canada
Erik Nielsen February 19, 1983 (Interim) June 11, 1983 Yukon Interim leader until 1983 leadership convention
  Brian Mulroney June 11, 1983 June 13, 1993 Central Nova, Manicouagan, Charlevoix 18th Prime Minister of Canada
  Kim Campbell June 13, 1993 December 14, 1993 Vancouver Centre 19th Prime Minister of Canada
  Jean Charest December 14, 1993 April 2, 1998 Sherbrooke
  Elsie Wayne April 2, 1998 (Interim) November 14, 1998 Saint John Interim until 1998 leadership election
  Joe Clark November 14, 1998 May 31, 2003 Kings—Hants, Calgary Centre His second tenure as leader
  Peter MacKay May 31, 2003 December 7, 2003 Central Nova Final leader of the Progressive Conservative Party; merged the PC Party with Stephen Harper's Canadian Alliance in 2003, cofounding the new Conservative Party of Canada.

Conservative Party of Canada (2003-present)Edit

Leader Term start Term end Constituency Notes
  John Lynch-Staunton 8 December 2003 20 March 2004 Senator for Grandville, Quebec Interim leader, served concurrently as Senate Opposition Leader.
1st   Stephen Harper 20 March 2004 19 October 2015 Calgary Southwest, Alberta First official leader of the modern Conservative Party of Canada;

Served as Leader of the Official Opposition from 2004–2006, and Prime Minister from 2006–2015.

  Rona Ambrose 5 November 2015 27 May 2017 Sturgeon River—Parkland, Alberta Interim leader, served concurrently as Leader of the Official Opposition.
2nd   Andrew Scheer 27 May 2017 24 August 2020 Regina—Qu'Appelle, Saskatchewan Served concurrently as Leader of the Official Opposition 2017-2020;

(resigned 12 December 2019, remained leader until his successor was chosen on 24 August 2020).[1]

3rd   Erin O'Toole 24 August 2020 present Durham, Ontario Concurrently the Leader of the Official Opposition since 2020

Electoral performance of Tory leadersEdit

Conservative (historical; 1867-1942)Edit

Election Leader Party name # of candidates nominated # of seats won +/– Election Outcome # of total votes % of popular vote Position
1867 John A. Macdonald Conservatives, Liberal-Conservatives 112
100 / 180
 100  1st 92,656 34.53% Majority
1872 John A. Macdonald Conservatives, Liberal-Conservatives, one Conservative Labour 140
100 / 200
    1st 123,100 38.66% Minority
1874 John A. Macdonald Conservatives, Liberal-Conservatives, one Conservative Labour 104
65 / 206
  35   2nd 99,440 30.58% Opposition
1878 John A. Macdonald Conservatives, Liberal-Conservatives 161
129 / 206
  64   1st 229,191 42.06% Majority
1882 John A. Macdonald Conservatives, Liberal-Conservatives 168
136 / 215
  7   1st 208,544 40.39% Majority
1887 John A. Macdonald Conservatives, Liberal-Conservatives 203
111 / 215
  25   1st 343,805 47.41% Majority
1891 John A. Macdonald Conservatives, Liberal-Conservatives 212
117 / 215
  6   1st 376,518 48.58% Majority
1896 Charles Tupper Conservatives, Liberal-Conservatives 207
98 / 213
  19   2nd 467,415 48.17% Opposition
1900 Charles Tupper Conservatives, Liberal-Conservatives 204
79 / 213
  9   2nd 438,330 46.1% Opposition
1904 Robert Borden Conservatives, Liberal-Conservatives 205
75 / 214
  4   2nd 470,430 45.94% Opposition
1908 Robert Borden Conservatives, Liberal-Conservatives 211
85 / 221
  10   2nd 539,374 46.21% Opposition
1911 Robert Borden Conservatives, Liberal-Conservatives and Nationalist Conservatives 212
132 / 221
  48   1st 636,938 48.90% Majority
1917 Robert Borden Unionist Party 211
152 / 235
  20   1st 1,070,694 56.93% Majority
1921 Arthur Meighen National Liberal and Conservative Party 204
49 / 235
  103   3rd 935,651 29.95% Third Party
1925 Arthur Meighen Conservatives 232
114 / 245
  65   1st 1,454,253 46.13% Minority - initially formed Opposition; became government upon invitation of Governor-General following non-confidence vote
1926 Arthur Meighen Conservatives 232
91 / 245
  23   2nd 1,476,834 45.34% Opposition
1930 R. B. Bennett Conservatives 229
135 / 245
  44   1st 1,836,115 47.79% Majority
1935 R. B. Bennett Conservatives 228
39 / 245
  94   2nd 1,290,671 29.84% Opposition
1940 Robert James Manion National Government 207
39 / 245
    2nd 1,402,059 30.41% Opposition

Progressive Conservative Party of Canada (1942-2003)Edit

Election Leader Votes % Seats +/– Position Role Government
1945 John Bracken 1,448,744 27.62%
64 / 245
  27   2nd Opposition Liberal minority
1949 George A. Drew 1,734,261 29.62%
41 / 262
  23   2nd Opposition Liberal majority
1953 George A. Drew 1,749,579 31.01%
50 / 265
  9   2nd Opposition Liberal majority
1957 John Diefenbaker 2,564,732 38.81%
109 / 265
  59   1st Minority PC minority
1958 John Diefenbaker 3,908,633 53.56%
208 / 265
  99   1st Majority PC majority
1962 John Diefenbaker 2,865,542 37.22%
114 / 265
  94   1st Minority PC minority
1963 John Diefenbaker 2,591,613 32.80%
93 / 265
  21   2nd Opposition Liberal minority
1965 John Diefenbaker 2,500,113 32.41%
95 / 265
  2   2nd Opposition Liberal minority
1968 Robert Stanfield 2,554,397 31.43%
72 / 264
  23   2nd Opposition Liberal majority
1972 Robert Stanfield 3,388,980 35.02%
107 / 264
  35   2nd Opposition Liberal minority
1974 Robert Stanfield 3,371,319 35.46%
95 / 264
  22   2nd Opposition Liberal majority
1979 Joe Clark 4,111,606 35.89%
136 / 282
  51   1st Minority PC minority
1980 Joe Clark 3,552,994 32.49%
103 / 282
  33   2nd Opposition Liberal majority
1984 Brian Mulroney 6,278,818 50.03%
211 / 282
  108   1st Majority PC majority
1988 Brian Mulroney 5,667,543 43.02%
169 / 295
  42   1st Majority PC majority
1993 Kim Campbell 2,178,303 16.04%
2 / 295
  167   5th No status Liberal majority
1997 Jean Charest 2,446,705 18.84%
20 / 301
  18   5th Fifth party Liberal majority
2000 Joe Clark 1,566,994 12.19%
12 / 301
  8   5th Fifth party Liberal majority

Conservative Party of Canada (2003-present)Edit

Election Leader Votes % Seats +/– Position Government
2004 Stephen Harper 4,019,498 29.63
99 / 308
  21   2nd Opposition
2006 5,374,071 36.27
124 / 308
  25   1st Minority
2008 5,209,069 37.65
143 / 308
  19   1st Minority
2011 5,832,401 39.62
166 / 308
  23   1st Majority
2015 5,578,101 31.89
99 / 338
  67   2nd Opposition
2019 Andrew Scheer 6,239,227 34.34
121 / 338
  22   2nd Opposition

Other conservative parties' leadersEdit

Parties that have had representation in the House of CommonsEdit

"Reform-Alliance"Edit

Leaders of the Reform Party of CanadaEdit
Leaders of the Canadian AllianceEdit

Leaders of the Reconstruction Party of CanadaEdit

Leaders of the Social Credit Party of CanadaEdit

Parties that have had no representation in the House of CommonsEdit

Leaders of the Christian Heritage Party of CanadaEdit

Leaders of the Libertarian Party of CanadaEdit

  • Sieg Pedde (1973–1974)
  • Charles 'Chuck' Lyall (1974–1976)
  • Ron Bailey (1976–1978)
  • Alex Eaglesham (1978–1979)
  • Linda Cain (1980–1982)
  • Neil Reynolds (May 1982 – 1983)
  • Victor Levis (1983–1987)
  • Dennis Corrigan (1987–1990)
  • Stanislaw Tyminski (1990–1991)
  • George Dance (1991–1993)
  • Hilliard Cox (May 1993 – 1995)
  • George Dance (1995–1996)
  • Vincent Pouliot (May 12, 1996 – April 5, 1997)
  • Robert Morse (1997)
  • Jean-Serge Brisson (1997 - May 18, 2008)[f][2]
  • Dennis Young (May 18, 2008 - May 2011)
  • Katrina Chowne (May 2011 – May 2014)
  • Tim Moen (May 2014 – present)

Leaders of the Progressive Canadian PartyEdit

Leaders of the Western Block PartyEdit

  • Doug Christie (November 30, 2005 – March 11, 2013)
  • Paul St. Laurent (March 11, 2013 – January 31, 2014)

Leader of the Alliance of the NorthEdit

  • François Bélanger (September 11, 2013 — present)

Leader of the People's Party of Canada

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Tunney, Catharine; Harris, Kathleen (12 Dec 2019). "Conservative caucus backs Scheer as interim leader amid private school backlash". CBC News. Retrieved 1 Feb 2019.
  2. ^ Agenda Archived 2011-06-14 at the Wayback Machine

NotesEdit

  • ^[a] Created Viscount Bennett following his retirement from office.
  • ^[b] On this occasion, Meighen failed in his attempts to win re-election to the House of Commons, so Hanson remained Leader of the Opposition throughout Meighen's term
  • ^[c] Bracken did not win election to the House of Commons until 1945, so Hanson remained Leader of the Opposition until January 1943, when he was replaced by Gordon Graydon
  • ^[d] On two occasions when Drew was too ill to perform his duties, William Earl Rowe served as Leader of the Opposition
  • ^[e] Michael Starr served as Leader of the Opposition until November 5, 1967, when Stanfield, who had previously been premier of Nova Scotia, won election to Parliament
  • ^[f] Brisson led the party on an interim basis prior to being elected at a delegated convention in 2000.