Joseph Pardo (rabbi)

Joseph Pardo (born ca. 1561[1] – died 9 October 1619) was an Italian rabbi and merchant. He was born in Thessaloniki, but went to Venice before 1589, where he served as rabbi to the Levantine community and also engaged in business.[2] Later, he emigrated to the Netherlands and was appointed Hakham of the Bet Ya'akob congregation in Amsterdam founded by Jacob Tirado, holding office from 1597 until his death.

Rabbi

Joseph Pardo
Personal
Bornca. 1561
Died9 October 1619
ReligionJudaism
SpouseReina
ChildrenIsaac,
Abraham,
David
SynagogueBet Ya'akob congregation, Amsterdam
Began1597
Ended1619
YahrtzeitRosh Chodesh Cheshvan, 5380 A.M.
BuriedBeth Haim of Ouderkerk aan de Amstel

In 1615 he founded the Hermandad de las Huerfanas and Moher ha-Betulot, now the Santa Compania de Dotar Orphas e Donzelas. Some liturgical poems by him are included in the "Imre Noam" (Amsterdam, 1628; very rare).[3][4] He was married to Reina (died at Amsterdam, 1631) and had three sons:[1] Their eldest son, Isaac Pardo, died at Uskup in Turkey. Their second son, Abraham Pardo, died in Jerusalem.[4]

Their third son, David (ca. 1591 – 1657), died at Amsterdam.[5] David's son, Joseph Pardo, was an English hazzan (died 1677).[2][6]

Pardo died in Amsterdam[1] on Wednesday, 9 October 1619 (Rosh Chodesh Cheshvan, 5380 A.M.)[7] and is buried at Beth Haim of Ouderkerk aan de Amstel.[1]

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ a b c d "Haham Joseph PARDO". 1999. Retrieved 1 October 2015.
  2. ^ a b David, Abraham. "PARDO, JOSEPH". Jewishvirtuallibrary.org. American–Israeli Cooperative Enterprise. Retrieved 1 October 2015.
  3. ^ Galino, Yosef Sholom (1628). אמרי נועם [Imre Noam] (in Hebrew). Amsterdam: Menasseh Ben Israel. OCLC 233086045. Retrieved Oct 12, 2015.
  4. ^ a b   One or more of the preceding sentences incorporates text from a publication now in the public domainSinger, Isidore; et al., eds. (1901–1906). "Joseph Pardo". The Jewish Encyclopedia. New York: Funk & Wagnalls. Retrieved Oct 1, 2015.
    Jewish Encyclopedia bibliography:
  5. ^ "Rabbi/Haham David 'Joseph' PARDO". 1999. Retrieved 2 October 2015.
  6. ^ "Hazan Joseph 'David' PARDO". 1999. Retrieved 2 October 2015.
  7. ^ Hebrew inscription on his gravestone gravestone.