John Jellicoe (illustrator)

John Timothy Jellicoe (5 January 1842 – buried 13 June 1914) was a British illustrator who produced large number of illustrations for newspapers and magazines as well as illustrating books and stories by a wide range of authors.

John Timothy Jellicoe
John Jellicoe with a sketchpad in front of two female figures
John Jellicoe at the Ripon millenary festival - probably a self-portrait
Born(1842-01-05)5 January 1842
DiedJune 1914(1914-06-00) (aged 72)
Willesden, London, England
NationalityEnglish
OccupationIllustrator
Years active1869 – 1912
Known forIllustrating sporting and dramatic events
Notable work
The Record of the Ripon Millenary

Early lifeEdit

Jellicoe was born in London on 5 January 1842 to George Daniel Jellicoe (31 May 1799 – 8 December 1877), a solicitor's clerk and Ann Thomas (c. 1810 – October 1875).[1] The census returns show Jellicoe as the second child of his parents. Ann Thomas was his father's second wife, and Jellicoe had a half-sister Harriet Sophia Jellicoe (1828 – aft. March 1911)[note 1] and three half-brothers alive when he was born.[note 2] Jellicoe was baptised on 20 February 1842 in St Mary, Islington, London.[1]

Marriages and familyEdit

Jellicoe married Georgina Annie Wiltshire (12 December 1841 – 18 October 1872), at Millbrook, Hampshire on 23 May 1868.[2][3] The couple had one son, George Edward Jellicoe (c. 1872 – aft. 1924) who became a publisher.[note 3][4]

At the time of the 1871 Census, Jellicoe was living at 1 Brook Road, Stoke Newington, London, where his son, George Edward, was born. Georgina died on 18 October 1872.[5] Jellicoe remarried three years later to Charlotte Anne Holland (1845 – October–November 1913). They had two children Mabel (1877 – 1945) and Gordon (1885 – 1941).

The 1881 census found Jellicoe living at 2 Grosvenor Park Villas with his wife and two children. His occupation had changed from artist in wood to artist (figures). By 1891 Jellicoe was living at 74 Parkhill Road, Hampstead, where he would remain until 1907 at least. By the 1911 census he was staying at Gondar House, Gondar Gardens in Hampstead. By 1913 he was living at 5 Park Avenue, north of Hampstead.

WorksEdit

John studied art in London and began exhibiting in 1865. He exhibited pen and ink drawings, paintings, and watercolours at the Society of British Artists and the Royal Academy.[note 4][6] Jellicoe was regarded as an exceptionally fine figure artist and often collaborated with other illustrators by drawing figures into their illustrations of buildings and places.[7]

Periodical IllustrationsEdit

Jellicoe was an illustrator for the Illustrated Sporting and Dramatic News as well as illustrating for other periodicals including the Illustrated London News, St. Paul's Magazine[note 5][8] , The Windsor Magazine,[9] and the boys' papers Union Jack and The Boy's Own Paper.[10]

Illustrations of the Ripon Millenary FestivalEdit

Jellicoe attended the Ripon Millenary Festival, held in Ripon, North Yorkshire, in 1886. This was one of the pageants of the late Victorian vogue for Merrie England.[11]

Book illustrationsEdit

Jellicoe illustrated books and stories by the following authors (source of the attribution is cited for each author):

Example of book illustrationEdit

While most of Jellicoe's illustrations were line drawings, he did a number of illustrations in colour. The Story of Joan of Arc (1906) was a children's book written by Andrew Lang (31 March 1844 – 20 July 1912). The book was published in by T. C. and E. C. Jack in London and Edinburgh. Jellicoe produced eight colour illustrations for the book, one of which (the wounding in battle) was used as a book cover.

DeathEdit

Charlotte died in Willesden in October or November 1913,[39] and Jellicoe followed in June 1914.[40] He was buried on 13 June 1914[41] in the same plot in Hampstead Cemetery where Charlotte had been buried on 4 November.[42]

NotesEdit

  1. ^ His half-sister Jellicoe was living with him in 1911, and was described as half-witted on the census form. She was 82 at the time.
  2. ^ another two half-brothers had dies in infancy.
  3. ^ Sir Geoffrey Allan Jellicoe (8 October 1900 – 17 July 1996), the famous Landscape architect was George Edward's son
  4. ^ It is not clear if the Royal Academy, which had originally refused to exhibit Watercolours had changed its policy by this time.
  5. ^ The publisher James Virtue set up St Paul's Magazine to rival Cornhill and copied the format, frequency and price. Virtue originally hope the call it Anthony Trollope's Magazine.

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ a b Ancestry.com (2010). "London Metropolitan Archives; London, England; Reference Number: p83/mry1/1177". London, England, Church of England Births and Baptisms, 1813-1917. Provo, Utah: Ancestry.com.
  2. ^ "Index entry". FreeBMD. ONS. Retrieved 23 March 2020.
  3. ^ "Marriages". Berkshire Chronicle (Saturday 30 May 1868): 8. 1868-05-30.
  4. ^ Moggridge, Hal (2005-05-26). "Jellicoe, Sir Geoffrey Alan". Oxford Dictionary of National Biography. Archived from the original on 2019-12-06. Retrieved 2020-03-26.
  5. ^ "Index entry". FreeBMD. ONS. Retrieved 26 March 2020.
  6. ^ Beatrice (2018). "The History of Watercolours". Mall Galleries. Archived from the original on 2020-03-25. Retrieved 2020-03-25.
  7. ^ MacAlister, J. Y. W., ed. (1902). "English Book Illustration of To-Day: By R. E. D. Sketchley". The Library: A Quarterly Review of Bibliography and Library Lore: New Series. London: Kegan Paul, Trench, Trubner And Co., Ltd. (3): 192. Retrieved 2020-03-25.
  8. ^ Sutherland, John (1989). "St Paul's Magazine". The Stanford Companion to Victorian Fiction. Stanford, California: Stanford University Press. p. 550.
  9. ^ "Sketches at Boscombe, Bournemouth". Art of the Print. Archived from the original on 2005-12-30. Retrieved 2020-03-23.
  10. ^ Holland, Steve. "Artists: Jellicoe, John". British Juvenile Story Papers and Pocket Libraries Index. Archived from the original on 2020-02-06. Retrieved 2020-03-25.
  11. ^ Marios Costambeys; Andrew J. Hamer; Martin Heale (2007). The Making of the Middle Ages: Liverpool Essays. Liverpool University Press. pp. 5–. ISBN 978-1-84631-068-3.
  12. ^ A. & C. Black Ltd. (1967). "Brockington, Rev. Alfred Allen". Who Was Who: Volume III 1929-1940: A Companion to Who's Who Containing the Biographies of Those Who Died Diring the Period 1929-1940. III (4th ed.). London: Adam and Charles Black. p. 165. Retrieved 2020-05-04.
  13. ^ Francesca Bugliani Knox; John Took (3 March 2016). Poetry and Prayer: The Power of the Word II. Taylor & Francis. pp. 17–18. ISBN 978-1-317-07938-5. Retrieved 25 March 2020.
  14. ^ a b c d e f "Search". Library Hub Discover. Retrieved 2020-03-24.
  15. ^ a b "Search". Internet Archive. Retrieved 2020-03-24.
  16. ^ a b c d e f g h i j "Search". AbeBooks.co.uk. Archived from the original on 2020-03-25. Retrieved 2020-03-24.
  17. ^ a b c d e f g "Books by Jellicoe, John". Project Gutenberg. Archived from the original on 2020-03-25. Retrieved 2020-03-24.
  18. ^ a b "Advertisement for Old England's Flag, the Christmas Number of The Union Jack". Fishing Gazette (Saturday 04 November 1882): 15. 1882-11-04.
  19. ^ a b c d e f g h i j "Main Catalogue". Explore the British Library. 1882-11-04.
  20. ^ Clute, John (2018-08-31). "Halidom, M Y". The Encyclopedia of Science Fiction. Archived from the original on 2019-04-20. Retrieved 2020-05-04.
  21. ^ Vuohelainen, Minna. "Bernard Heldmann and the Union Jack, 1880-83: The making of a professional author" (PDF). Victorian Periodicals Review. 47 (1): 106. Archived (PDF) from the original on 2020-03-26. Retrieved 2020-03-22.
  22. ^ Holland, Steve. "Contents Lists". British Juvenile Story Papers and Pocket Libraries Index. Archived from the original on 2020-02-06. Retrieved 2020-03-26.
  23. ^ "Author: Emma Leslie (1838–1909) (real name Emma Boultwood)". At the Circulating Library: A database of Victorian Fiction 1837-1901. 2019-12-31. Retrieved 2020-05-05.
  24. ^ Kirk, John Foster (1908). "Low, Charles Rathbone". A Supplement To Allibone S Critical Dictionary Of English Literature British And American Authors. II. Philadelphia: J. B. Lippincott Company. pp. 1020–1021.
  25. ^ Holland, Steve. "Contents Lists". British Juvenile Story Papers and Pocket Libraries Index. Archived from the original on 2020-02-06. Retrieved 2020-03-26.
  26. ^ "Death of Noted Old Cheltonian: Col. Mockler-Ferryman, Regimental Historian". Cheltenham Chronicle (Saturday 31 May 1930): 3. 1930-05-31.
  27. ^ Holland, Steve. "Contents Lists". British Juvenile Story Papers and Pocket Libraries Index. Archived from the original on 2016-03-17. Retrieved 2020-03-26.
  28. ^ "Death of Mr. Charles Eyre Pascoe". Westminster Gazette (Tuesday 12 November 1912): 14. 1912-11-12.
  29. ^ "Death of a Children's Authoress". Gloucester Citizen (Saturday 17 November 1923): 6. 1923-11-17.
  30. ^ "Chas. Pond's Highly Romantic Life Ended: London: Oct 17". Variety (Tuesday November 3, 1931): 63. 1931-11-03. Retrieved 2020-03-25.
  31. ^ "Death of Mr. R. Seeley". West Surrey Times (Friday 17 January 1913): 7. 1913-01-17.
  32. ^ A. & C. Black Ltd. (1967). "Sherer, John Walter". Who Was Who: Volume I: 1897-1915: A Companion to Who's Who Containing the Biographies of Those Who Died During the Period 1897-1915. London: Adam and Charles Black. p. 645. Retrieved 2020-05-05.
  33. ^ "Mr. J. W. Sherer". The Times (Monday 01 January 1912): 11. 1912-01-01.
  34. ^ "Fashionable and Personal". Sevenoaks Chronicle and Kentish Advertiser (Friday 28 February 1936): 10. 1936-02-28.
  35. ^ "Wills and Estates". The Scotsman (Thursday 21 May 1936): 13. 1936-05-21.
  36. ^ Holland, Steve. "Contents Lists". British Juvenile Story Papers and Pocket Libraries Index. Archived from the original on 2020-02-06. Retrieved 2020-03-26.
  37. ^ a b Holland, Steve. "Contents Lists". British Juvenile Story Papers and Pocket Libraries Index. Archived from the original on 2020-02-06. Retrieved 2020-03-26.
  38. ^ "Author: Lily Watson (1849–1932) (pseudonym for Martha Louisa Watson nee Green)". At the Circulating Library: A database of Victorian Fiction 1837-1901. 2019-12-31. Archived from the original on 2016-03-24. Retrieved 2020-05-05.
  39. ^ "Index entry". FreeBMD. ONS. Retrieved 23 March 2020.
  40. ^ "Index entry". FreeBMD. ONS. Retrieved 23 March 2020.
  41. ^ "Burial Registry Summary: Jellicoe: John Timothy; 13 June 1914". Deceased online. Retrieved 2020-03-26.
  42. ^ "Burial Registry Summary: Jellicoe: Charlotte Anne: 04 November 1913". Deceased online. Retrieved 2020-03-26.

External linksEdit

Note that some links will include works by Admiral John Rushwood Jellicoe, and not just by John Jellicoe.