1,5-Hexadiene is the organic compound with the formula (CH2)2(CH=CH2)2. It is a colorless, volatile liquid. It is used as a crosslinking agent and precursor to a variety of other compounds.

1,5-Hexadiene
1,5-hexadienestick.png
Names
Preferred IUPAC name
Hexa-1,5-diene
Other names
diallyl, biallyl, α,ω-Hexadiene
Identifiers
3D model (JSmol)
ChemSpider
ECHA InfoCard 100.008.869
EC Number 209-754-7
UNII
Properties
C6H10
Molar mass 82.146 g·mol−1
Appearance colorless liquid
Boiling point 59–60 °C (138–140 °F; 332–333 K)
Hazards
GHS pictograms GHS02: FlammableGHS07: HarmfulGHS08: Health hazard
GHS signal word Danger
H225, H304, H315, H319, H335, H336
P210, P233, P240, P241, P242, P243, P261, P264, P271, P280, P301+310, P302+352, P303+361+353, P304+340, P305+351+338, P312, P321, P331, P332+313, P337+313, P362, P370+378, P403+233, P403+235, P405
Except where otherwise noted, data are given for materials in their standard state (at 25 °C [77 °F], 100 kPa).
Infobox references

SynthesisEdit

1,5-Hexadiene is produced commercially by the ethenolysis of 1,5-cyclooctadiene:[1]

(CH2CH=CHCH2)2 + 2 CH2=CH2 → 2 (CH2)2CH=CH2

The catalyst is derived from Re2O7 on alumina.

A laboratory-scale preparation involves reductive coupling of allyl chloride using magnesium:[2]

2 ClCH2CH=CH2 + Mg → (CH2)2(CH=CH2)2 + MgCl2

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Lionel Delaude; Alfred F. Noels (2005). "Metathesis". Kirk-Othmer Encyclopedia of Chemical Technology. Weinheim: Wiley-VCH. doi:10.1002/0471238961.metanoel.a01.
  2. ^ Amos Turk; Henry Chanan (1947). "Biallyl". Org. Synth. 27: 7. doi:10.15227/orgsyn.027.0007.