A Haredi news hotline is a telephone service that serves as an important source of news in the Haredi world. Many Haredim do not listen to the radio or have access to the internet, leaving them with little or no access to breaking news. News hotlines were formed to fill this gap, and many have expanded to additional fields over time.[1][2] Currently, many news lines provide rabbinic lectures, entertainment, business advice and similar services, in addition to their primary function of reporting the news. Many hasidic sects maintain their own hotlines, where relevant internal news is reported and the group's perspective can be advocated for. In the Israeli Haredi community, there are dozens of prominent hotlines, in both Yiddish and Hebrew. Some Haredi hotlines have played significant public roles,[3] however many prominent services have faced struggles.[1]

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Kol MevaserEdit

Kol Mevaser is a Yiddish news hotline. It reports the news, weather, lottery, traffic, and carries interviews and scholarly lectures on various topics of interest to the Yiddish-speaking Orthodox Jewish community. [4][5]

Frum News WireEdit

Frum News Wire, or FNW, is based in Lakewood Township, New Jersey.[2][6] FNW carries local and world news, audio recordings of notable events, and various forms of entertainment.[2] FNW has had interviews with notable hareidi personalities, such as Jake Turx, Yossi Gestetner, and Richard Roberts.[citation needed].

According to FNW, most callers call more than once a day, and the hotline has an average total of fifteen thousand calls a day. It says that the majority of its listeners are from the tri-state area, with approximately half from Lakewood.[7]

Yeshiva International NewslineEdit

Yeshiva International Newsline, often referred to as YIN, is a Haredi news hotline, based in Lakewood Township, New Jersey. [8][9]

HistoryEdit

YIN was started in 2012 on a restricted access network which required a password, and was advertised by word of mouth. Often broadcasting news that was unavailable in the mainstream English language hareidi media, it successfully carved out a niche for itself within the Haredi yeshiva community. In its early period, the hotline issued extensive coverage of the plans and efforts underway in Israel to initiate a compulsory draft of Haredi yeshiva students.The hotline espoused a Satmar like position, and strongly praised Rabbi Shmuel Auerbach and his no compromise policy regarding the draft law.

Current formatEdit

YIN eventually switched to an open access system and started carrying advertisements. As the hotline grew more popular, YIN gradually shifted from its intense focus on Israeli Haredi news to more general coverage, although it continues to report Israeli news. Together with news reports, the hotline features a music section, rabbinic lectures, documentaries (deemed appropriate for the hareidi audience), and various seasonal sections, usually before major Jewish holidays.

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ a b "קווי נייעס ספקי החדשות והרכילות של המגזר החרדי, נלחמים על חייהם" [Haredi news hotlines fighting to stay alive]. Haaretz (in Hebrew).
  2. ^ a b c Blau, Shloimy (August 23, 2012). "12,000 Calls a Day, One Number: Behind the Scenes at FNW". The Voice of Lakewood.
  3. ^ "Haredi protestors shut down Jerusalem roads for the second week in a row". The Jerusalem Post | JPost.com. Retrieved 2018-03-07. ...Instructions were eventually sent out at 6:30 p.m. over the Jerusalem Faction's telephone hotlines for the protesters to disperse, and only then were the roads and junctions they had blocked open to traffic again.
  4. ^ "Editors' Thoughts: A Remarkable Student Body". Kol Hamevaser. 2013-05-23. Retrieved 2018-02-27. Other institutions continue to bear a similar name, including a Yiddish broadcasting hotline (try 212-444-1100).
  5. ^ "Misaskim's 23rd International Tehillim Asifa this Tuesday @1PM EDT". www.misaskim.org. Retrieved 2018-02-27. You can also listen to the event live through Kol Mevaser by dialing 212-444-1100, and following the appropriate prompts.
  6. ^ Ess, Em (2016-09-27). "Hefkervelt : There's no debating, Night seder comes first". Hefkervelt. Retrieved 2018-02-28.
  7. ^ "The Voice of Lakewood". The Voice of Lakewood. March 8, 2018. p. 279. FNW gets an average of 15,00 calls every day... Half the listeners are Lakewood residents; most live in the tri-state area; and most call more than once a day.
  8. ^ International, Yeshiva. "YESHIVA INTERNATIONAL". Retrieved 2018-03-07.
  9. ^ "yeshivaInternational (@yinupdates) | Twitter". twitter.com. Retrieved 2018-03-07.

External linksEdit