On 20 February 2011, a state election was held in Hamburg, Germany, for the 20th legislative period of the Hamburg Parliament after World War II. The election is a result of the collapse of the coalition government led by the Christian Democratic Union (CDU) and the Green Alternative List (GAL).[1] The Hamburg Parliament was officially dissolved on December 15, 2010.[1] The Social Democratic Party (SPD) won an absolute majority after winning 62 seats.[2] Absolute majorities are considered rare in Germany.[3] The Free Democratic Party (FDP) re-entered parliament after failing to win any seats in the previous election.[2]

Hamburg state election, 2011

← 2008 20 February 2011[1] 2015 →

All 121 seats of the Hamburg Parliament.
61 seats needed for a majority
Turnout57.3
  First party Second party Third party
  Olaf Scholz, August 2009 - by SPD-Schleswig-Holstein.jpg Christoph Ahlhaus.jpg Anja Hajduk IMG 6220 edit.jpg
Leader Olaf Scholz Christoph Ahlhaus Anja Hajduk
Party SPD CDU Green
Seats won 62[2] 28[2] 14[2]
Seat change Increase17 Decrease28 Increase2
Popular vote 1,667,804 753,805 384,502
Percentage 48.4% 21.9% 11.2%
Swing Increase14.3% Decrease20.7% Increase1.6%

  Fourth party Fifth party
  2011-06-23-Katja-Suding-06.jpg 2011-06-23-dora-heyenn-by-RalfR-06.jpg
Leader Katja Suding Dora Heyenn
Party FDP Left
Seats won 9[2] 8[2]
Seat change Increase9 Steady
Popular vote 229,125 220,428
Percentage 6.7% 6.4%
Swing Increase1.9% Steady

Mayor before election

Christoph Ahlhaus
CDU

Elected Mayor

Olaf Scholz
SPD

Annkathrin Kammeyer's election made her the youngest member of the Hamburg Parliament in history, at 21 years of age.[4]

Contents

CollapseEdit

The relationship between the Christian Democratic Union and the Green Alternative List has been strained since the former Mayor Ole von Beust announced he was stepping down in July.[1][5] Von Beust was a popular mayor and was seen as the guarantor for the coalition government.[5] The CDU/Green party coalition was the first coalition government between the two parties in Germany.[1][6] Christoph Ahlhaus was chosen as the mayor.[1] Since Ahlhaus became mayor, there were many conflicts which were intensifying.[1] Ahlhaus had been critical of the GAL on several occasions.[7]

Issues and CampaignEdit

PollsEdit

Party Last
election
11-02-2011[8] 13-02-2011[9]
  CDU 42.6% 23% 24%
  SPD 34.1% 46% 45%
  GAL 9.6% 14.5% 15%
  The Left 6.4% 6% 6%
  FDP 4.8% 5% 5%

ResultsEdit

Parties Votes % +/- Seats +/- %
Social Democratic Party 1,667,804 48.4% +14.3 62 +17 51.2%
Christian Democratic Union 753,805 21.9% -20.7 28 -28 23.1%
Green-Alternative List 384,502 11.2% +1.6 14 +2 11.6%
Free Democratic Party 229,125 6.7% +1.9 9 +9 7.4%
The Left 220,428 6.4% ±0.0 8 ±0 6.6%
Pirate Party Germany 73,126 2.1% +1.9 0 ±0
All Others 3.4% +1.1 0 ±0
Totals 3,444,602 100.0% 121

Post-electionEdit

Post election analysis showed that the election result was strongly dominated by local issues (82% of voters according to Forschungsgruppe Wahlen).[10]

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ a b c d e f g "Hamburg vote set for February after coalition collapses". The Local. 29 November 2010. Retrieved 29 November 2010.
  2. ^ a b c d e f g "Merkel's party hammered in state elections". Deutsche Welle. 20 February 2011. Retrieved 20 February 2011.
  3. ^ Pidd, Helen (20 February 2011). "Angela Merkel's Christian Democrats suffer heavy Hamburg defeat". The Guardian. Retrieved 3 April 2011.
  4. ^ Jule Bleyer (7 March 2011). "Annkathrin Kammeyer: Keck im Parlament" (in German). Hamburger Abendblatt. Retrieved 15 May 2012.
  5. ^ a b "Germany's only CDU-Green coalition falls". The Local. 28 November 2010. Retrieved 29 November 2010.
  6. ^ "Greens in Hamburg end coalition with CDU". Deutsche Welle. 29 November 2010. Retrieved 28 November 2010.
  7. ^ Knight, Dennis (February 18, 2011). "Trend-Setting Loss Would Spell Trouble for Merkel". Spiegel Online. Retrieved February 18, 2011.
  8. ^ "Umfragen: SPD vorn, Ahlhaus enttäuscht" (in German). Hamburger Morgenpost. February 11, 2011. Archived from the original on February 13, 2011. Retrieved February 11, 2011.
  9. ^ "SPD and Greens set for power in Hamburg". The Local. February 13, 2011. Retrieved February 13, 2011.
  10. ^ "SPD bei 48,3 Prozent - die CDU holt 21,9 Prozent". Hamburger Abendblatt. February 19, 2011. Retrieved October 4, 2013.