Hainesport Township is a township in Burlington County, New Jersey, United States. As of the 2010 United States Census, the township's population was 6,110,[8][9][10] reflecting an increase of 1,984 (+48.1%) from the 4,126 counted in the 2000 Census, which had in turn increased by 877 (+27.0%) from the 3,249 counted in the 1990 Census.[19]

Hainesport Township, New Jersey
Township of Hainesport
Broad Street of Hainesport
Broad Street of Hainesport
Hainesport Township highlighted in Burlington County. Inset map: Burlington County highlighted in the State of New Jersey.
Hainesport Township highlighted in Burlington County. Inset map: Burlington County highlighted in the State of New Jersey.
Census Bureau map of Hainesport Township, New Jersey
Census Bureau map of Hainesport Township, New Jersey
Hainesport Township is located in Burlington County, New Jersey
Hainesport Township
Hainesport Township
Location in Burlington County
Hainesport Township is located in New Jersey
Hainesport Township
Hainesport Township
Location in New Jersey
Hainesport Township is located in the United States
Hainesport Township
Hainesport Township
Location in the United States
Coordinates: 39°58′41″N 74°50′11″W / 39.977956°N 74.836334°W / 39.977956; -74.836334Coordinates: 39°58′41″N 74°50′11″W / 39.977956°N 74.836334°W / 39.977956; -74.836334[1][2]
Country United States
State New Jersey
CountyBurlington
IncorporatedMarch 12, 1924
Government
 • TypeTownship
 • BodyTownship Committee
 • MayorFrank Masciocchi (R, term ends December 31, 2019)[3][4]
 • Administrator / Municipal clerkPaula L. Kosco[5]
Area
 • Total6.723 sq mi (17.414 km2)
 • Land6.459 sq mi (16.730 km2)
 • Water0.264 sq mi (0.685 km2)  3.93%
Area rank183rd of 566 in state
18th of 40 in county[1]
Elevation49 ft (15 m)
Population
 • Total6,110
 • Estimate 
(2018)[11]
6,003
 • Rank341st of 566 in state
27th of 40 in county[12]
 • Density945.9/sq mi (365.2/km2)
 • Density rank392nd of 566 in state
25th of 40 in county[12]
Time zoneUTC−5:00 (Eastern (EST))
 • Summer (DST)UTC−4:00 (Eastern (EDT))
ZIP Code
Area code(s)609[15]
FIPS code3400529010[1][16][17]
GNIS feature ID0882092[1][18]
Websitewww.hainesporttownship.com

HistoryEdit

The Lenape native people who settled on the banks of the Rancocas Creek in what is present day Hainesport called the area Sandhickney.[20] The first European settlers were Quakers who arrived in 1677.[20]

The town was known as Long Bridge around the time of the American Revolutionary War. The name came from the long, wooden bridge that spanned the Rancocas Creek.[21] In 1778, the township was the site of a skirmish in which American rebels fired upon Hessian soldiers after they were halted by the dismantling of this bridge.[22][23]

The settlement became known as Haines' Port when Barclay Haines bought property in the area and established a wharf near his home on the Rancocas Creek [22][24] in 1848. By 1850,the name was shortened to Hainesport. Hainesport Township was incorporated as a township by an act of the New Jersey Legislature on March 12, 1924, from portions of Lumberton Township.[25]

GeographyEdit

According to the United States Census Bureau, the township had a total area of 6.723 square miles (17.414 km2), including 6.459 square miles (16.730 km2) of land and 0.264 square miles (0.685 km2) of water (3.93%).[1][2]

Unincorporated communities, localities and place names located partially or completely within the township include Clermont, Creekview, Franklin Estates, The Glen at Mason's Creek, Hainesport Chase, Lakeside at Creekview, Mason's Woods, Oakdale, Rancocas Heights, Sage Run and Union Mills.[26][27]

The township borders Lumberton Township, Mount Laurel Township, Mount Holly Township and Westampton Township (across the Rancocas Creek north branch).[28]

DemographicsEdit

Census Pop.
1930984
1940858−12.8%
19501,793109.0%
19603,27182.4%
19702,990−8.6%
19803,2368.2%
19903,2490.4%
20004,12627.0%
20106,11048.1%
Est. 20186,003[11][29][30]−1.8%
Population sources: 1930-2000[31]
1930[32] 1930-1990[33]
2000[34][35] 2010[8][9][10]

Census 2010Edit

As of the 2010 United States Census, there were 6,110 people, 2,239 households, and 1,726.269 families residing in the township. The population density was 945.9 per square mile (365.2/km2). There were 2,305 housing units at an average density of 356.8 per square mile (137.8/km2). The racial makeup of the township was 84.78% (5,180) White, 7.50% (458) Black or African American, 0.10% (6) Native American, 4.08% (249) Asian, 0.00% (0) Pacific Islander, 1.42% (87) from other races, and 2.13% (130) from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 5.07% (310) of the population.[8]

There were 2,239 households out of which 34.8% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 65.0% were married couples living together, 8.0% had a female householder with no husband present, and 22.9% were non-families. 18.9% of all households were made up of individuals, and 9.9% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.72 and the average family size was 3.11.[8]

In the township, the population was spread out with 25.4% under the age of 18, 6.1% from 18 to 24, 24.2% from 25 to 44, 30.1% from 45 to 64, and 14.3% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 41.9 years. For every 100 females there were 92.9 males. For every 100 females ages 18 and older there were 89.9 males.[8]

The Census Bureau's 2006-2010 American Community Survey showed that (in 2010 inflation-adjusted dollars) median household income was $87,047 (with a margin of error of +/- $8,609) and the median family income was $95,054 (+/- $7,689). Males had a median income of $64,477 (+/- $9,344) versus $40,658 (+/- $8,999) for females. The per capita income for the borough was $35,813 (+/- $2,708). No families and 1.9% of the population were below the poverty line, including 1.3% of those under age 18 and 1.1% of those age 65 or over.[36]

Census 2000Edit

As of the 2000 United States Census[16] there were 4,126 people, 1,477 households, and 1,150 families residing in the township. The population density was 632.8 people per square mile (244.3/km²). There were 1,555 housing units at an average density of 238.5 per square mile (92.1/km²). The racial makeup of the township was 94.09% White, 2.67% African American, 0.10% Native American, 1.70% Asian, 0.51% from other races, and 0.95% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino people of any race were 2.13% of the population.[34][35]

There were 1,477 households out of which 35.7% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 67.5% were married couples living together, 7.2% had a female householder with no husband present, and 22.1% were non-families. 17.5% of all households were made up of individuals and 8.3% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.78 and the average family size was 3.16.[34][35]

In the township the population was spread out with 26.3% under the age of 18, 5.7% from 18 to 24, 31.4% from 25 to 44, 24.9% from 45 to 64, and 11.8% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 38 years. For every 100 females, there were 95.7 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 94.5 males.[34][35]

The median income for a household in the township was $66,417, and the median income for a family was $72,005. Males had a median income of $49,015 versus $33,932 for females. The per capita income for the township was $28,091. About 2.0% of families and 3.0% of the population were below the poverty line, including 3.1% of those under age 18 and 5.2% of those age 65 or over.[34][35]

Parks and recreationEdit

A portion of Rancocas State Park is located in Hainesport Township. There are hiking/biking trails, equestrian trails, and canoe and fishing access to the Rancocas Creek. This part of Rancocas State Park is jointly managed by Burlington County Parks and the State Department of Parks and Forestry.[37] Long Bridge Park, a Burlington County Park, is located between Deacon Road and the Mount Holly By-Pass and has entrances from both roadways. Besides fishing and hiking and biking trails, there are children's play areas, drinking fountains, and restrooms. Groups can reserve picnic pavilions with charcoal grills.[38] A township park surrounds the municipal building. There is a play ground and the walking trails connect the park to the Hainesport Public School play ground. There are tennis and pickle ball courts and soccer, soft ball, and baseball fields. Local businesses and families sponsor a summer concert series.[39]

GovernmentEdit

Local governmentEdit

Hainesport Township is governed under the township form of government. The five-member Township Committee is elected directly by the voters at-large in partisan elections to serve three-year terms of office on a staggered basis, with either one or two seats coming up for election each year as part of the November general election in a three-year cycle.[6][40] At an annual reorganization meeting, the Township Committee selects one of its members to serve as Mayor and another as Deputy Mayor.[41]

As of 2019, members of the Hainesport Township Committee are Mayor Frank Masciocchi (R, term as committee member and as mayor ends December 31, 2019), Deputy Mayor Leila Gilmore (R, term on committee and as deputy mayor ends 2019), Gerard A. Clauss (R, 2021), Ted Costa (R, 2020) and Lee Schneider (R, 2020).[3][42][43][44][45]

In 2004, former mayor Ronald Corn was sentenced to five years in prison after he pleaded guilty to charges that he had improperly used more than $300,000 of public funds.[46][47]

Federal, state and county representationEdit

Hainesport Township is located in the 3rd Congressional District[48] and is part of New Jersey's 8th state legislative district.[9][49][50]

For the 116th United States Congress, New Jersey's 3rd Congressional District is represented by Andy Kim (D, Bordentown).[51]

New Jersey is represented in the United States Senate by Democrats Cory Booker (Newark, term ends 2021)[52] and Bob Menendez (Paramus, term ends 2025).[53][54]

For the 2018–2019 session (Senate, General Assembly), the 8th Legislative District of the New Jersey Legislature is represented in the State Senate by Dawn Marie Addiego (R, Evesham Township) and in the General Assembly by Joe Howarth (R, Evesham Township) and Ryan Peters (R, Hainesport Township).[55][56]

Burlington County is governed by a board of chosen freeholders, whose five members are elected at-large in partisan elections to three-year terms of office on a staggered basis, with either one or two seats coming up for election each year; at an annual reorganization meeting, the board selects a director and deputy director from among its members.[57] As of 2018, Burlington County Board of Chosen Freeholders are Director Kate Gibbs (R, Lumberton Township, term as freeholder and as director ends December 31, 2018),[58] Deputy Director Linda Hughes (R, Evesham Township, term as freeholder and as deputy director ends 2018)[59] Tom Pullion (D, Edgewater Park, 2020),[60]Balvir Singh (D, Burlington Township, 2020),[61] and Latham Tiver (R, Southampton Township, 2019).[62][57][63][64] Burlington County's Constitutional Officers are County Clerk Tim Tyler (R, Fieldsboro, 2018),[65][66] Sheriff Jean E. Stanfield (R, Westampton, 2019)[67][68] and Surrogate Mary Ann O'Brien (R, Medford, 2021).[69][70][64]

PoliticsEdit

As of March 23, 2011, there were a total of 4,014 registered voters in Hainesport Township, of which 1,089 (27.1% vs. 33.3% countywide) were registered as Democrats, 1,244 (31.0% vs. 23.9%) were registered as Republicans and 1,679 (41.8% vs. 42.8%) were registered as Unaffiliated. There were 2 voters registered to other parties.[71] Among the township's 2010 Census population, 65.7% (vs. 61.7% in Burlington County) were registered to vote, including 88.0% of those ages 18 and over (vs. 80.3% countywide).[71][72]

In the 2012 presidential election, Republican Mitt Romney received 1,650 votes here (50.9% vs. 40.2% countywide), ahead of Democrat Barack Obama with 1,545 votes (47.7% vs. 58.1%) and other candidates with 19 votes (0.6% vs. 1.0%), among the 3,239 ballots cast by the township's 4,217 registered voters, for a turnout of 76.8% (vs. 74.5% in Burlington County).[73][74] In the 2008 presidential election, Democrat Barack Obama received 1,679 votes here (50.3% vs. 58.4% countywide), ahead of Republican John McCain with 1,594 votes (47.8% vs. 39.9%) and other candidates with 39 votes (1.2% vs. 1.0%), among the 3,338 ballots cast by the township's 4,022 registered voters, for a turnout of 83.0% (vs. 80.0% in Burlington County).[75] In the 2004 presidential election, Republican George W. Bush received 1,643 votes here (54.0% vs. 46.0% countywide), ahead of Democrat John Kerry with 1,367 votes (44.9% vs. 52.9%) and other candidates with 26 votes (0.9% vs. 0.8%), among the 3,045 ballots cast by the township's 3,650 registered voters, for a turnout of 83.4% (vs. 78.8% in the whole county).[76]

In the 2013 gubernatorial election, Republican Chris Christie received 1,444 votes here (69.7% vs. 61.4% countywide), ahead of Democrat Barbara Buono with 566 votes (27.3% vs. 35.8%) and other candidates with 28 votes (1.4% vs. 1.2%), among the 2,073 ballots cast by the township's 4,222 registered voters, yielding a 49.1% turnout (vs. 44.5% in the county).[77][78] In the 2009 gubernatorial election, Republican Chris Christie received 1,250 votes here (55.4% vs. 47.7% countywide), ahead of Democrat Jon Corzine with 856 votes (37.9% vs. 44.5%), Independent Chris Daggett with 105 votes (4.7% vs. 4.8%) and other candidates with 27 votes (1.2% vs. 1.2%), among the 2,258 ballots cast by the township's 4,044 registered voters, yielding a 55.8% turnout (vs. 44.9% in the county).[79]

EducationEdit

The Hainesport Township School District serves public school students in pre-kindergarten through eighth grade at the Hainesport School.[80] As of the 2014-15 school year, the district and its one school had an enrollment of 936 students and 57.8 classroom teachers (on an FTE basis), for a student–teacher ratio of 16.2:1.[81]

For ninth through twelfth grades, public school students attend the Rancocas Valley Regional High School, a comprehensive regional public high school serving students from five communities encompassing approximately 40 square miles (100 km2) and comprises the communities of Eastampton Township, Hainesport Township, Lumberton Township, Mount Holly Township and Westampton Township.[82][83][84] As of the 2014-15 school year, the high school had an enrollment of 2,077 students and 110.0 classroom teachers (on an FTE basis), for a student–teacher ratio of 18.9:1.[85] The school is located in Mount Holly Township and is part of the Rancocas Valley Regional High School District.

Students from Hainesport Township, and from all of Burlington County, are eligible to attend the Burlington County Institute of Technology, a countywide public school district that serves the vocational and technical education needs of students at the high school and post-secondary level at its campuses in Medford and Westampton Township.[86]

TransportationEdit

 
Route 38 in Hainesport

Roads and highwaysEdit

As of May 2010, the township had a total of 43.05 miles (69.28 km) of roadways, of which 30.72 miles (49.44 km) were maintained by the municipality, 9.50 miles (15.29 km) by Burlington County and 2.83 miles (4.55 km) by the New Jersey Department of Transportation.[87]

Route 38 passes through in the center of the township. The two major county roads that pass through are CR 537 near the center and CR 541 in the eastern section.

Interstate 295 and the New Jersey Turnpike are accessible outside the municipality in neighboring Westampton and Mount Laurel Townships.

Public transportationEdit

NJ Transit provides bus service in the township on the 317 route between Asbury Park and Philadelphia, and on the 413 route between Camden and Burlington.[88][89]

BurLink bus service is offered on the B1 route operating between Beverly and Pemberton.[90]

Points of interestEdit

Barclay Haines home, 1848.

Mount Moriah AME Church Cemetery contains the graves of 22 Afro-American Civil War veterans.[citation needed]

Notable peopleEdit

People who were born in, residents of, or otherwise closely associated with Hainesport Township include:

ReferencesEdit

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  3. ^ a b Township Committee Members, Township of Hainesport. Accessed October 17, 2019.
  4. ^ 2019 New Jersey Mayors Directory, New Jersey Department of Community Affairs. Accessed August 1, 2019.
  5. ^ Administrator / Clerk, Township of Hainesport. Accessed October 17, 2019.
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  84. ^ History of the School, Rancocas Valley Regional High School. Accessed June 1, 2016. "The district encompasses approximately 40 square miles (100 km2) and comprises the townships of Eastampton, Hainesport, Lumberton, Mount Holly, and Westampton."
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  89. ^ South Jersey Transit Guide, Cross County Connection, as of April 1, 2010. Accessed November 26, 2013.
  90. ^ BurLINK Bus System, Cross County Connection. Accessed October 17, 2019.
  91. ^ "Ben Ijalana Drafted By The Indianapolis Colts", Villanova Wildcats football, April 29, 2011. Accessed July 18, 2019. "Ijalana, a native of Hainesport, N.J., and a graduate of Rancocas Valley High School, started all 53 games of his Villanova career and helped the Wildcats to a 40-13 record, three NCAA playoff appearances and the 2009 FCS National Championship."
  92. ^ Levinsky, David. "Burlington County Freeholder Ryan Peters picked to run for 8th District Assembly seat", Burlington County Times, September 6, 2017. Accessed January 19, 2018. "Burlington County Freeholder Ryan Peters likely didn’t expect to have to do much campaigning this fall, since his seat on the county board isn’t up for re-election until next year. That changed Wednesday after the Hainesport resident was picked by the Burlington County Republican Committee to replace Assemblywoman Maria Rodriguez-Gregg on the party’s 8th Legislative District ticket."

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