Gubernatorial lines of succession in the United States

StatesEdit

AlabamaAlaskaArizonaArkansasCaliforniaColoradoConnecticutDelawareFloridaGeorgiaHawaiiIdahoIllinoisIndianaIowaKansasKentuckyLouisianaMaineMarylandMassachusettsMichiganMinnesotaMississippiMissouriMontanaNebraskaNevadaNew HampshireNew JerseyNew MexicoNew YorkNorth CarolinaNorth DakotaOhioOKlahomaOregonPennsylvaniaRhode IslandSouth CarolinaSouth DakotaTennesseeTexasUtahVermontVirginiaWashingtonWest VirginiaWisconsinWyoming

AlabamaEdit

Provided for by Article V, Section 127 of the Constitution of Alabama.[1]

# Office Current officeholder
Governor of Alabama Kay Ivey (R)
1 Lieutenant Governor of Alabama Will Ainsworth (R)
2 President pro tempore of the Senate Del Marsh (R)
3 Speaker of the House of Representatives Mac McCutcheon (R)
4 Attorney General Steve Marshall (R)
5 Auditor Jim Zeigler (R)
6 Secretary of State John Merrill (R)
7 Treasurer John McMillan (R)

AlaskaEdit

Provided for by Article III, Section 10 of the Constitution of Alaska.[2]

# Office Current officeholder
Governor of Alaska Mike Dunleavy (R)
1 Lieutenant Governor of Alaska Kevin Meyer (R)

ArizonaEdit

Provided for by Article V, Section 6 of the Constitution of Arizona.[3]

# Office Current officeholder
Governor of Arizona Doug Ducey (R)
1 Secretary of State Katie Hobbs (D)
2 Attorney General Mark Brnovich (R)
3 Treasurer Kimberly Yee (R)
4 Superintendent of Public Instruction Kathy Hoffman (D)

ArkansasEdit

Provided for by Article VI, Section 5 of the Constitution of Arkansas as amended.[4]

# Office Current officeholder
Governor of Arkansas Asa Hutchinson (R)
1 Lieutenant Governor of Arkansas Tim Griffin (R)
2 President pro tempore of the Senate Jim Hendren (R)
3 Speaker of the House of Representatives Matthew Shepherd (R)

CaliforniaEdit

Provided for by Article V, Section 10 of the Constitution of California[5] and Title 2, Division 3 of the California Codes.[6][7]

# Office Current officeholder
Governor of California Gavin Newsom (D)
1 Lieutenant Governor Eleni Kounalakis (D)
2 President pro tempore of the Senate Toni Atkins (D)
3 Speaker of the Assembly Anthony Rendon (D)
4 Secretary of State Alex Padilla (D)
5 Attorney General Xavier Becerra (D)
6 Treasurer Fiona Ma (D)
7 Controller Betty Yee (D)
8 Superintendent of Public Instruction Tony Thurmond (NP)
9 Insurance Commissioner Ricardo Lara (D)
10 Chair of the Board of Equalization Malia Cohen (D)
11 List of 4–7 people named by Governor
(subject to confirmation by the Senate)
in the case of war or enemy-caused disaster.

ColoradoEdit

Provided for by Article IV, Section 13 of the Constitution of Colorado.[8]

# Office Current officeholder
Governor of Colorado Jared Polis (D)
1 Lieutenant Governor Dianne Primavera (D)
2 President pro tempore of the Senate[a] Leroy Garcia (D)
3 Speaker of the House of Representatives[a] KC Becker (D)
4 Minority Leader of the House[a] Patrick Neville (R)
5 Minority Leader of the Senate[b] Chris Holbert (R)

ConnecticutEdit

Provided for by Article IV, Sections 18–21 of the Constitution of Connecticut.[9]

# Office Current officeholder
Governor of Connecticut Ned Lamont (D)
1 Lieutenant Governor Susan Bysiewicz (D)
2 President pro tempore of the Senate Martin Looney (D)

DelawareEdit

Provided for by Article III, Section 20 of the Constitution of Delaware.[10]

# Office Current officeholder
Governor of Delaware John Carney (D)
1 Lieutenant Governor Bethany Hall-Long (D)
2 Secretary of State Jeffrey W. Bullock (D)
3 Attorney General Kathy Jennings (D)
4 President pro tempore of the Senate David McBride (D)
5 Speaker of the House of Representatives Peter Schwartzkopf (D)

FloridaEdit

Provided for by Article IV, Section 3 of the Constitution of Florida[11] and Florida Statute 14.055.[12]

# Office Current officeholder
Governor of Florida Ron DeSantis (R)
1 Lieutenant Governor Jeanette Núñez (R)
2 Attorney General Ashley Moody (R)
3 Chief Financial Officer Jimmy Patronis (R)
4 Commissioner of Agriculture Nikki Fried (D)

GeorgiaEdit

Provided for by Article V, Section 1, Paragraph V of the Constitution of Georgia.[13]

# Office Current officeholder
Governor of Georgia Brian Kemp (R)
1 Lieutenant Governor Geoff Duncan (R)
2 Speaker of the House of Representatives David Ralston (R)

HawaiiEdit

Provided for by Article V, Section 4 of the Constitution of Hawaii[14] and Title 4 §26-2 of the Hawaii code.[15]

# Office Current officeholder
Governor of Hawaii David Ige (D)
1 Lieutenant Governor Josh Green (D)
2 President of the Senate Ron Kouchi (D)
3 Speaker of the House of Representatives Scott Saiki (D)
4 Attorney General Clare E. Connors (D)
5 Director of Finance Roderick Becker
6 Comptroller Curt Otaguro
7 Director of Taxation Linda Chu Takayama
8 Director of Human Resources Development Ryker Wada

IdahoEdit

Provided for by Article IV, Sections 12–14 of the Constitution of Idaho.[16]

# Office Current officeholder
Governor of Idaho Brad Little (R)
1 Lieutenant Governor Janice McGeachin (R)
2 President pro tempore of the Senate Brent Hill (R)

IllinoisEdit

Provided for by Article V, Section 6 of the Constitution of Illinois[17] and the Governor Succession Act[18]

# Office Current officeholder
Governor of Illinois J. B. Pritzker (D)
1 Lieutenant Governor Juliana Stratton (D)
2 Attorney General Kwame Raoul (D)
3 Secretary of State Jesse White (D)
4 Comptroller Susana Mendoza (D)
5 Treasurer Mike Frerichs (D)
6 President of the Senate John Cullerton (D)
7 Speaker of the House of Representatives Michael Madigan (D)

IndianaEdit

Provided for by Article V, Section 10 of the Constitution of Indiana.[19]

# Office Current officeholder
Governor of Indiana Eric Holcomb (R)
1 Lieutenant Governor Suzanne Crouch (R)
2 Speaker of the House of Representatives Brian Bosma (R)
3 President pro tempore of the Senate Rodric Bray (R)
4 Treasurer Kelly Mitchell (R)
5 Secretary of State Connie Lawson (R)
6 Auditor Tera Klutz (R)
7 Superintendent of Public Instruction Jennifer McCormick (R)

IowaEdit

Provided for by Article IV, Sections 17–19 of the Constitution of Iowa.[20]

# Office Current officeholder
Governor of Iowa Kim Reynolds (R)
1 Lieutenant Governor Adam Gregg (R)
2 President of the Senate Charles Schneider (R)
3 Speaker of the House of Representatives Linda Upmeyer (R)

KansasEdit

Provided for by KSA Statute 75–125[21] and the Emergency Interim Executive and Judicial Succession Act of 1994.[22]

# Office Current officeholder
Governor of Kansas Laura Kelly (D)
1 Lieutenant Governor Lynn Rogers (D)
2 President of the Senate Susan Wagle (R)
3 Speaker of the House of Representatives Ron Ryckman Jr. (R)
Eligible to serve as emergency interim Governor if 1–3 are vacant
4 Secretary of State Scott Schwab (R)
5 Attorney General Derek Schmidt (R)

KentuckyEdit

Provided for by Sections 84,[23] 85[24] and 87[25] of the Kentucky Constitution.

# Office Current officeholder
Governor of Kentucky Matt Bevin (R)
1 Lieutenant Governor Jenean Hampton (R)
2 President of the Senate Robert Stivers (R)
3 Attorney General[c] Andy Beshear (D)
4 Auditor[c] Mike Harmon (R)

LouisianaEdit

Provided for by Article IV, Section 14 of the Constitution of Louisiana.[26]

# Office Current officeholder
Governor of Louisiana John Bel Edwards (D)
1 Lieutenant Governor Billy Nungesser (R)
2 Secretary of State Kyle Ardoin (R)
3 Attorney General Jeff Landry (R)
4 Treasurer John Schroder (R)
5 President of the Senate John Alario (R)
6 Speaker of the House of Representatives Taylor Barras (R)

MaineEdit

Provided for by Article V, Part 1, Section 14 of the Constitution of Maine.[27]

# Office Current officeholder
Governor of Maine Janet Mills (D)
1 President of the Senate Troy Jackson (D)
2 Speaker of the House of Representatives Sara Gideon (D)
3 Secretary of State[c] Matthew Dunlap (D)

MarylandEdit

Provided for by Article II, Section 6 of the Constitution of Maryland.[28]

# Office Current officeholder
Governor of Maryland Larry Hogan (R)
1 Lieutenant Governor Boyd Rutherford (R)
2 President of the Senate[d] Thomas V. Miller Jr. (D)

MassachusettsEdit

Provided for by Article LV of the Constitution of Massachusetts.[29]

# Office Current officeholder
Governor of Massachusetts Charlie Baker (R)
1 Lieutenant Governor Karyn Polito (R)
2 Secretary of the Commonwealth Bill Galvin (D)
3 Attorney General Maura Healey (D)
4 Treasurer and Receiver-General Deb Goldberg (D)
5 Auditor Suzanne M. Bump (D)

MichiganEdit

Provided for by Article V, Section 26 of the Constitution of Michigan.[30]

# Office Current officeholder
Governor of Michigan Gretchen Whitmer (D)
1 Lieutenant Governor Garlin Gilchrist (D)
2 Secretary of State Jocelyn Benson (D)
3 Attorney General Dana Nessel (D)

MinnesotaEdit

Provided for by Article V, Section 5 of the Minnesota Constitution[31] and Minnesota Statute 4.06.[32]

# Office Current officeholder
Governor of Minnesota Tim Walz (DFL)
1 Lieutenant Governor Peggy Flanagan (DFL)
2 President of the Senate Jeremy Miller (R)
3 Speaker of the House of Representatives Melissa Hortman (DFL)
4 Secretary of State Steve Simon (DFL)
5 Auditor Julie Blaha (DFL)
6 Attorney General Keith Ellison (DFL)

MississippiEdit

Provided for by Article V, Section 131 of the Constitution of Mississippi.[33]

# Office Current officeholder
Governor of Mississippi Phil Bryant (R)
1 Lieutenant Governor Tate Reeves (R)
2 President pro tempore of the Senate Gray Tollison (R)
3 Speaker of the House of Representatives Philip Gunn (R)

MissouriEdit

Provided for by Article IV, Section 11(a) of the Constitution of Missouri.[34]

# Office Current officeholder
Governor of Missouri Mike Parson (R)
1 Lieutenant Governor Mike Kehoe (R)
2 President pro tempore of the Senate Dave Schatz (R)
3 Speaker of the House of Representatives Elijah Haahr (R)
4 Secretary of State Jay Ashcroft (R)
5 Auditor Nicole Galloway (D)
6 Treasurer Scott Fitzpatrick (R)
7 Attorney General Eric Schmitt (R)

MontanaEdit

Provided for by Article VI, Section 6 of the Constitution of Montana[35] and Montana Code 2-16-511 to 2-16-513.[36][37][38]

# Office Current officeholder
Governor of Montana Steve Bullock (D)
1 Lieutenant Governor Mike Cooney (D)
2 President of the Senate Scott Sales (R)
3 Speaker of the House of Representatives Greg Hertz (R)
4 Most senior member of the Montana Legislature[e] Sen. Gene Vuckovich (D)

NebraskaEdit

Provided for by Article IV, Section 16 of the Constitution of Nebraska.[39]

# Office Current officeholder
Governor of Nebraska Pete Ricketts (R)
1 Lieutenant Governor Mike Foley (R)
2 Speaker of the Legislature Jim Scheer (R)[f]

NevadaEdit

Provided for by Nevada Revised Statute 223.080.[40]

# Office Current officeholder
Governor of Nevada Steve Sisolak (D)
1 Lieutenant Governor Kate Marshall (D)
2 President pro tempore of the Senate Mo Denis (D)
3 Speaker of the Assembly Jason Frierson (D)
4 Secretary of State Barbara Cegavske (R)

New HampshireEdit

Provided for by Part 2, Article 49 of the Constitution of New Hampshire.[41]

# Office Current officeholder
Governor of New Hampshire Chris Sununu (R)
1 President of the Senate Donna Soucy (D)
2 Speaker of the House of Representatives Steve Shurtleff (D)
3 Secretary of State[c] Bill Gardner (D)
4 Treasurer[c] Bill Dwyer

New JerseyEdit

Provided for by Article V, Section I, Paragraph 7 of the Constitution of New Jersey[42] and New Jersey Revised Statute 52:14A-4.[43]

# Office Current officeholder
Governor of New Jersey Phil Murphy (D)
1 Lieutenant Governor Sheila Oliver (D)
2 President of the Senate Stephen M. Sweeney (D)
3 Speaker of the General Assembly Craig Coughlin (D)
Eligible to serve as emergency interim Governor if 1–3 are vacant
4 Attorney General Gurbir Grewal (D)
5 Commissioner of Transportation Diane Gutierrez-Scaccetti

New MexicoEdit

Provided for by Article V, Section 7 of the Constitution of New Mexico[44]

# Office Current officeholder
Governor of New Mexico Michelle Lujan Grisham (D)
1 Lieutenant Governor Howie Morales (D)
2 Secretary of State Maggie Toulouse Oliver (D)
3 President pro tempore of the Senate Mary Kay Papen (D)
4 Speaker of the House of Representatives Brian Egolf (D)

New YorkEdit

Provided for by Article IV, Sections 5–6 of the New York Constitution[45] and Article 1-A, Section 5 of the Defense Emergency Act of 1951.[46]

# Office Current officeholder
Governor of New York Andrew Cuomo (D)
1 Lieutenant Governor Kathy Hochul (D)
2 Temporary President of the Senate Andrea Stewart-Cousins (D)
3 Speaker of the Assembly Carl Heastie (D)
Eligible to serve as emergency interim Governor if 1–3 are vacant
4 Attorney General Letitia James (D)
5 Comptroller Thomas DiNapoli (D)
6 Commissioner of Transportation Marie Therese Dominguez
7 Commissioner of Health Howard A. Zucker
Commissioner of Commerce[g] n/a
Industrial Commissioner[g] n/a
8 Chair of the Public Service Commission John B. Rhodes
9 Secretary of State Rossana Rosado (D)

North CarolinaEdit

Provided for by Article III, Section 3 of the Constitution of North Carolina[47] and G.S. Section 147.11.1.[48]

# Office Current officeholder
Governor of North Carolina Roy Cooper (D)
1 Lieutenant Governor Dan Forest (R)
2 President pro tempore of the Senate Philip E. Berger (R)
3 Speaker of the House of Representatives Tim Moore (R)
4 Secretary of State Elaine Marshall (D)
5 Auditor Beth Wood (D)
6 Superintendent of Public Instruction Mark Johnson (R)
7 Attorney General Josh Stein (D)
8 Commissioner of Agriculture Steve Troxler (R)
9 Commissioner of Labor Cherie Berry (R)
10 Commissioner of Insurance Mike Causey (R)

North DakotaEdit

Provided for by Article V, Section 11 of the Constitution of North Dakota.[49]

# Office Current officeholder
Governor of North Dakota Doug Burgum (R)
1 Lieutenant Governor Brent Sanford (R)
2 Secretary of State Alvin Jaeger (R)

OhioEdit

Provided for by Article III, Section 15 of the Constitution of Ohio[50] and Title I, Chapter 161 of the Ohio Revised Code.[51]

# Office Current officeholder
Governor of Ohio Mike DeWine (R)
1 Lieutenant Governor Jon A. Husted (R)
2 President of the Senate Larry Obhof (R)
3 Speaker of the House of Representatives Larry Householder (R)
4 Secretary of State Frank LaRose (R)
5 Treasurer Robert Sprague (R)
6 Auditor Keith Faber (R)
7 Attorney General Dave Yost (R)

OklahomaEdit

As provided by Article VI, Section 15 of the Constitution of Oklahoma[52] and the Oklahoma Emergency Interim Executive and Judicial Succession Act.

# Office Current officeholder
Governor of Oklahoma Kevin Stitt (R)
1 Lieutenant Governor of Oklahoma Matt Pinnell (R)
2 President Pro Tempore of the Senate Greg Treat (R)
3 Speaker of the House of Representatives Charles McCall (R)
Eligible to serve as emergency interim Governor if 1–3 are vacant
4 State Auditor and Inspector Cindy Byrd (R)
5 Attorney General Michael J. Hunter (R)
6 State Treasurer Randy McDaniel (R)
7 Superintendent of Public Instruction Joy Hofmeister (R)
8 Labor Commissioner Leslie Osborn (R)
9 Corporation Commissioner (by length of tenure) Bob Anthony (R)
10 Dana Murphy (R)
11 Todd Hiett (R)

OregonEdit

Provided for by Article V, Section 8a of the Constitution of Oregon[53]

# Office Current officeholder
Governor of Oregon Kate Brown (D)
Secretary of State Bev Clarno (R)[h]
1 Treasurer Tobias Read (D)
2 President of the Senate Peter Courtney (D)
3 Speaker of the House of Representatives Tina Kotek (D)

PennsylvaniaEdit

Provided for by Article IV, Sections 13–14 of the Pennsylvania Constitution[54][55]

# Office Current officeholder
Governor of Pennsylvania Tom Wolf (D)
1 Lieutenant Governor John Fetterman (D)
2 President pro tempore of the Senate Joe Scarnati (R)

Rhode IslandEdit

Provided for by Article IX, Sections 9–10 of the Constitution of Rhode Island[56]

# Office Current officeholder
Governor of Rhode Island Gina Raimondo (D)
1 Lieutenant Governor Daniel McKee (D)
2 Speaker of the House of Representatives Nicholas Mattiello (D)

South CarolinaEdit

Provided for by Article IV, Section 7 of the Constitution of South Carolina.[57] and Title 1, Chapter 3, Article 3, Sections 1-3-120 and 1-3-130 of the South Carolina Code of Laws.[58]

# Office Current officeholder
Governor of South Carolina Henry McMaster (R)
1 Lieutenant Governor Pamela Evette (R)
2 President of the Senate Harvey S. Peeler Jr. (R)
3 Speaker of the House of Representatives Jay Lucas (R)

South DakotaEdit

Provided for by Article IV, Section 6 of the Constitution of South Dakota.[59]

# Office Current officeholder
Governor of South Dakota Kristi Noem (R)
1 Lieutenant Governor Larry Rhoden (R)

TennesseeEdit

Provided for by Article III, Section 12 of the Constitution of Tennessee[60] and Acts 1941, Chapter 99 §1.[61]

# Office Current officeholder
Governor of Tennessee Bill Lee (R)
1 Lieutenant Governor and Speaker of the Senate Randy McNally (R)
2 Speaker of the House of Representatives Cameron Sexton (R)
3 Secretary of State Tre Hargett (R)
4 Comptroller of the Treasury Justin P. Wilson (R)

TexasEdit

Provided for by Article IV, Sections 3a and 16–18 of the Constitution of Texas[62] and Chapter 401.023 of Title 4 the Texas Code.[63]

# Office Current officeholder
Governor of Texas Greg Abbott (R)
1 Lieutenant Governor Dan Patrick (R)
2 President pro tempore of the Senate Joan Huffman (R)
3 Speaker of the House of Representatives Dennis Bonnen (R)
4 Attorney General Ken Paxton (R)
Chief Justices of the Texas Courts of Appeals, in numerical order
5 1st Court of Appeals (Houston) Sherry Radack (R)
6 2nd Court of Appeals (Fort Worth) Bonnie Sudderth (R)
7 3rd Court of Appeals (Austin) Jeff Rose (R)
8 4th Court of Appeals (San Antonio) Sandee Bryan Marion (R)
9 5th Court of Appeals (Dallas) Robert Burns III (D)
10 6th Court of Appeals (Texarkana) Josh Morriss (R)
11 7th Court of Appeals (Amarillo) Brian Quinn (R)
12 8th Court of Appeals (El Paso) Ann Crawford McClure (D)
13 9th Court of Appeals (Beaumont) Steve McKeithen (R)
14 10th Court of Appeals (Waco) Tom Gray (R)
15 11th Court of Appeals (Eastland) John M. Bailey (R)
16 12th Court of Appeals (Tyler) Jim Worthen (R)
17 13th Court of Appeals (Corpus Christi) Dori Contreras (D)
18 14th Court of Appeals (Houston) Kem Thompson Frost (R)

UtahEdit

Provided for by Article VII, Section 11 of the Constitution of Utah[64] and the Emergency Interim Succession Act (C53-2a-803).[65]

# Office Current officeholder
Governor of Utah Gary Herbert (R)
1 Lieutenant Governor Spencer Cox (R)
2 President of the Senate J. Stuart Adams (R)
3 Speaker of the House of Representatives Brad Wilson (R)
Eligible to serve as emergency interim Governor if 1–3 are vacant
4 Attorney General Sean Reyes (R)
5 Treasurer David Damschen (R)
6 Auditor John Dougall (R)

VermontEdit

Provided for by Chapter II, Section 20 of the Constitution of Vermont,[66] 3 VSA §1[67] and 20 VSA §183.[68]

# Office Current officeholder
Governor of Vermont Phil Scott (R)
1 Lieutenant Governor David Zuckerman (VPP)
2 Speaker of the House of Representatives Mitzi Johnson (D)
3 President pro tempore of the Senate Tim Ashe (D)
4 Secretary of State Jim Condos (D)
5 Treasurer Beth Pearce (D)

VirginiaEdit

Provided for by Article V, Section 16 of the Constitution of Virginia.[69]

# Office Current officeholder
Governor of Virginia Ralph Northam (D)
1 Lieutenant Governor Justin Fairfax (D)
2 Attorney General Mark Herring (D)
3 Speaker of the Delegates Kirk Cox (R)
4 House of Delegates convenes to fill the vacancy

WashingtonEdit

Provided for by Article III, Section 10 of the Constitution of Washington.[70]

# Office Current officeholder
Governor of Washington Jay Inslee (D)
1 Lieutenant Governor Cyrus Habib (D)
2 Secretary of State Kim Wyman (R)
3 Treasurer Duane Davidson (R)
4 Auditor Pat McCarthy (D)
5 Attorney General Bob Ferguson (D)
6 Superintendent of Public Instruction Chris Reykdal (NP)
7 Commissioner of Public Lands Hilary Franz (D)

West VirginiaEdit

Provided for by Article VII, Section 16 of the Constitution of West Virginia.[71]

# Office Current officeholder
Governor of West Virginia Jim Justice (R)
1 President of the Senate Mitch Carmichael (R)
2 Speaker of the House of Delegates Roger Hanshaw (R)
3 New Governor elected by a joint vote of the Legislature

WisconsinEdit

Provided for by Article V, Sections 7 and 8 of the Constitution of Wisconsin.[72]

# Office Current officeholder
Governor of Wisconsin Tony Evers (D)
1 Lieutenant Governor Mandela Barnes (D)
2 Secretary of State Doug La Follette (D)

WyomingEdit

Provided for by Article IV, Section 6 of the Wyoming Constitution.[73]

# Office Current officeholder
Governor of Wyoming Mark Gordon (R)
1 Secretary of State Edward Buchanan (R)

Federal districtEdit

Washington, D.C.Edit

Provided for by Title IV, Section 421(c)(2) of the District of Columbia Home Rule Act.[74]

# Office Current officeholder
Mayor of Washington, D.C. Muriel Bowser (D)
1 Chair of the City Council Phil Mendelson (D)

Organized territoriesEdit

American SamoaEdit

Provided for by Article IV, Section 4 Constitution of American Samoa[75] and Section 4.0106 of the American Samoa Codes Annotated.[76]

# Office Current officeholder
Governor of American Samoa Lolo Matalasi Moliga (D)[i]
1 Lieutenant Governor Lemanu Peleti Mauga (D)[i]
2 Speaker of the House of Representatives Savali Talavou Ale (R)[j]

GuamEdit

Provided for by Subchapter 1, Section 1422(b) of the Guam Organic Act of 1950.[77]

# Office Current officeholder
Governor of Guam Lou Leon Guerrero (D)
1 Lieutenant Governor Josh Tenorio (D)
2 Speaker of the Legislature Tina Rose Muna Barnes (D)

Northern Mariana IslandsEdit

Provided for by Article III, Section 7 of the Northern Mariana Islands Commonwealth Constitution.[78]

# Office Current officeholder
Governor of the Northern Mariana Islands Ralph Torres (R)
1 Lieutenant Governor Arnold Palacios (R)
2 President of the Senate Victor Hocog (R)

Puerto RicoEdit

Provided for by Article IV, Section 8 of the Constitution of Puerto Rico[79] and Law No. 7 of 2005[80]

# Office Current officeholder
Governor of Puerto Rico Wanda Vázquez Garced (PNP/R)
Secretary of State Vacant
Secretary of Justice Dennise Longo Quiñones (acting}
Secretary of Treasury Francisco Parés Alicea[k]
1 Secretary of Education Eligio Hernández Pérez
2 Secretary of Labor and Human Resources Briseida Torres Reyes
3 Secretary of Transportation and Public Works Carlos Contreras Aponte
4 Secretary of Economic Development and Commerce Manuel Laboy Rivera
5 Secretary of Health Rafael Rodríguez Mercado (PNP/R)

U.S. Virgin IslandsEdit

Provided for by Subsection IV §1595(b, e) of the Revised Organic Act of the Virgin Islands[81] and the Executive Succession Act of 1972[82]

# Office Current officeholder
Governor of the United States Virgin Islands Albert Bryan (D)
1 Lieutenant Governor Tregenza Roach (D)
2 President of the Legislature Novelle Francis (D)
3 Vice President of the Legislature Myron D. Jackson (D)
4 Commission of Finance Kirk Callwood
5 Attorney General Denise George
6 Director of the Office of Management and Budget Jenifer O'Neal
7 Commissioner of Education Racquel Berry-Benjamin
8 Commission of Public Works Nelson Petty Jr.
9 Commission of Sports, Parks and Recreation Calvert White
10 Police Commissioner Trevor Velinor

NotesEdit

  1. ^ a b c Must be the same party as the outgoing governor. If the current officeholder is not a member of the same party, skip to the next on the list.
  2. ^ If the Minority Leader of the Senate is not a member of the same party as the outgoing Governor, succession goes back to the President pro tempore of the Senate.
  3. ^ a b c d e Only eligible to serve until a new President of the Senate is elected.
  4. ^ Only eligible to serve until a new Governor is elected by the General Assembly.
  5. ^ Only eligible to serve until a new Governor is elected by a joint session of the Legislature.
  6. ^ The Nebraska Legislature is officially nonpartisan, but Speaker Scheer identifies with the Republican Party.
  7. ^ a b The New York Defense Emergency Act of 1951 calls for the "Commissioner of Commerce" and the "Industrial Commissioner" to be in the emergency line of succession. However, these departments/positions no longer exist and it is unclear if there have been statutory changes made to accommodate the line of succession.
  8. ^ Under the Oregon Constitution, officeholders in the line of succession who were appointed to their position are ineligible to succeed to the office of Governor.
  9. ^ a b Elections in American Samoa are officially nonpartisan, but Gov. Moliga and Lt. Gov. Mauga both identify with the Democratic Party.
  10. ^ Elections in American Samoa are officially nonpartisan, but Speaker Ale identifies with the Republican Party.
  11. ^ The Constitution of Puerto Rico requires that the Governor be at least 35 years old. As of August 2019, Secretary Parés is only 31.

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ "Constitution of Alabama 1901". Alabama Legislature. Retrieved August 22, 2019.
  2. ^ "The Constitution of the State of Alaska". Lieutenant Governor of Alaska. Retrieved August 22, 2019.
  3. ^ "Constitution of Arizona: Article V, Section 6". Arizona Legislature. Retrieved August 22, 2019.
  4. ^ "Constitution of the State of Arkansas of 1874" (PDF). Arkansas Legislature. Retrieved August 22, 2019.
  5. ^ "Constitution of California: Article V, Section 10". California Legislature. Retrieved August 22, 2019.
  6. ^ "Government Code, Article 5.5, Section 12058 — Succession to the Office of Governor". California Legislature. Retrieved August 22, 2019.
  7. ^ "Government Code, Article 5.5, Section 12061 — Succession to the Office of Governor in the Event of War or Enemy-Caused Disaster". California Legislature. Retrieved August 22, 2019.
  8. ^ "Constitution of Colorado: Article IV, Section 13". LexisNexis. Retrieved August 22, 2019.
  9. ^ "Constitution of Connecticut". Connecticut General Assembly. Retrieved August 22, 2019.
  10. ^ "Constitution of Delaware: Article III, Section 20". State of Delaware. Retrieved August 22, 2019.
  11. ^ "Constitution of Florida: Article IV, Section 3". Florida Legislature. Retrieved August 22, 2019.
  12. ^ "Florida Statutes 14.055". Law Server. Retrieved August 22, 2019.
  13. ^ "Georgia Constitution of 1983: Article V". Georgia Info. Retrieved August 22, 2019.
  14. ^ "The Constitution of the State of Hawaii: Article V". Hawaii Legislative Reference Bureau. Retrieved August 22, 2019.
  15. ^ "2013 Revised Hawaii Statutes 26-2: Order of succession to offices of governor and lieutenant governor". Justia. Retrieved August 22, 2019.
  16. ^ "Constitution of the State of Idaho: Article IV — Executive Department". Secretary of State of Idaho. Retrieved August 22, 2019.
  17. ^ "Constitution of the State of Illinois". Illinois General Assembly. Retrieved August 22, 2019.
  18. ^ "Illinois Compiled Statutes 15 ILCS 5 — Governor Succession Act". Illinois General Assembly. Retrieved August 23, 2019.
  19. ^ "Current Indiana Constitution as amended". Indiana General Assembly. Retrieved August 22, 2019.
  20. ^ "1857 Constitution of the State of Iowa" (PDF). Iowa General Assembly. Retrieved August 22, 2019.
  21. ^ "Article I: 75–125". Kansas Legislature. Retrieved August 22, 2019.
  22. ^ "Emergency Interim Executive and Judicial Succession Act of 1994". Kansas Legislature. Retrieved August 22, 2019.
  23. ^ "Constitution of Kentucky, Section 84". Kentucky General Assembly. Retrieved August 22, 2019.
  24. ^ "Constitution of Kentucky, Section 85". Kentucky General Assembly. Retrieved August 22, 2019.
  25. ^ "Constitution of Kentucky, Section 87". Kentucky General Assembly. Retrieved August 22, 2019.
  26. ^ "Constitution of Louisiana: Article IV. Executive Branch". Louisiana Senate. Retrieved August 22, 2019.
  27. ^ "Constitution of the State of Maine". Maine Legislature. Retrieved August 22, 2019.
  28. ^ "Constitution of Maryland: Article II". Maryland State Archives. Retrieved August 22, 2019.
  29. ^ "Massachusetts Constitution: Article LV". Massachusetts General Court. Retrieved August 22, 2019.
  30. ^ "State Constitution: Article V, Section 26". Michigan Legislature. Retrieved August 22, 2019.
  31. ^ "Constitution of the State of Minnesota: Article V". Office of the Revisor of Statutes. Retrieved August 22, 2019.
  32. ^ "Constitutional Offices and Duties, Chapter 4: 4.06". Office of the Revisor of Statutes. Retrieved August 22, 2019.
  33. ^ "The Constitution of the State of Mississippi" (PDF). Secretary of State of Mississippi. Retrieved August 22, 2019.
  34. ^ "Missouri Constitution Section: Article IV, Section 11(a)". Missouri General Assembly. Retrieved August 22, 2019.
  35. ^ "The Constitution of the State of Montana: Article VI, Section 6". Montana Legislature. Retrieved August 22, 2019.
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