Typical brooch of Finns proper found at Sortavala, Karelian Isthmus. It is dated to the 12th-14th centuries.[1][2]

Finnish tribes (Finnish: Heimot) are ancient ethnic groups from which over time Finns evolved.

In 1548 in his New Testament Mikael Agricola mentions that Finnish tribes are Finns, Tavastians and Karelians.[3] The same division can also be seen in typical brooches that women wore in the 12th to 14th centuries.[4] However, the metal culture, especially jewelry and weapons, had already evolved into distinctive and peculiar in the end of the Merovingian period in 8th century in the area of contemporary Finland.[5] The intention of this evolution was possibly to express specifically "Finnish" identity which was born from the image of common origin and mutual similarity.[5]

Finnish tribes are frequently mentioned in historical sources, such as papal letters, Novgorod First Chronicle and Eric Chronicles.

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ edited by Matti Saarnisto (2003). Karjalan synty. Viipurin läänin historia 1. Karjalan Kirjapaino Oy. pp. 346–347.CS1 maint: Extra text: authors list (link)
  2. ^ "solki; hevosenkenkäsolki". www.finna.fi (in Finnish). Retrieved 2018-03-02.
  3. ^ Tarkiainen, Kari (2010). Ruotsin itämaa. Svenska litteratursällskapet i Finland. p. 241.
  4. ^ Georg Haggren, Petri Halinen, Mika Lavento, Sami Raninen ja Anna Wessman (2015). Muinaisuutemme jäljet. Gaudeamus. p. 339.CS1 maint: Multiple names: authors list (link)
  5. ^ a b Georg Haggren, Petri Halinen, Mika Lavento, Sami Raninen ja Anna Wessman (2015). Muinaisuutemme jäljet. Gaudeamus. p. 269.CS1 maint: Multiple names: authors list (link)