Epyc is a brand of x86-64 microprocessors designed and marketed by AMD based on the company's Zen microarchitecture specifically targeted for server and embedded system markets. It was introduced in June 2017.[1] Epyc processors share the same microarchitecture as its regular desktop-grade counterparts but have enterprise-graded features such as higher core counts, more PCI Express lanes, support for larger amounts of RAM, and larger cache memory. It also supports multi-chip and dual-socket system configurations through the Infinity Fabric interchip interconnect.

AMD Epyc
AMD EPYC logo.png
ProducedFrom June 2017 to present
Marketed byAMD
Designed byAMD
Common manufacturer(s)
Max. CPU clock rate2.7 GHz to 3.2 GHz
Min. feature size14 nm to 7 nm
Instruction setAMD64/x86-64, MMX(+), SSE1, SSE2, SSE3, SSSE3, SSE4a, SSE4.1, SSE4.2, AES, CLMUL, AVX, AVX2, FMA3, CVT16/F16C, ABM, BMI1, BMI2, SHA
MicroarchitectureZen
Zen 2
Coresup to 128 cores/256 threads on dual-socket systems
Core name(s)
  • Naples
  • Rome
Socket(s)
PredecessorOpteron
Brand name(s)
  • Epyc
Epyc processor

HistoryEdit

In March 2017, AMD announced a server platform based on the Zen microarchitecture, codenamed Naples, and officially revealed it under the brand name Epyc in May.[2] That June, AMD officially launched Epyc by releasing the Epyc 7001 series processors.[3] Two years later, in August 2019, the Epyc 7002 series processors based on the Zen 2 microarchitecture released, bringing much better performance and double the cores compared to their predecessors.

The future Zen 3 based Epyc microarchitecture will be codenamed "Milan".[4]

DesignEdit

The platform includes one- and two-socket systems. In multi-processor configurations, two Epyc CPUs communicate via AMD's Infinity Fabric.[5] Each server chip supports 8 channels of memory and 128 PCIe 3.0 lanes, of which 64 lanes from each are used for CPU-to-CPU communication through Infinity Fabric when installed in a dual-processor configuration.[6] All Epyc processors are composed of four eight-core Zeppelin dies (the same die as found in Ryzen processors) in a multi-chip module, with the varying product core counts produced by symmetrically disabling cores of each core complex on each Zeppelin die.[7][8]

The first generation of Epyc microprocessors were manufactured by GlobalFoundries using a 14 nm FinFET process licensed from Samsung Electronics.[9] Epyc 2 will be manufactured by TSMC using a 7 nm FinFET process.[10]

ReceptionEdit

Initial reception to Epyc was generally positive.[11] Epyc was generally found to outperform Intel CPUs in cases where the cores could work independently, such as in high-performance computing and big-data applications. First generation Epyc fell behind in database tasks compared to Intel's Xeon parts due to higher cache latency.[11]

ProductsEdit

ServerEdit

First generation Epyc (Naples)Edit

Model Socket
configu-
ration
Cores
(threads)
Clock rate (GHz) Cache PCIe
Lanes
Memory
support
TDP Release
date
Release
price (USD)
Base Boost L2
(KiB)
L3
(MiB)
All-core Max
EPYC 7351P[12] [13][14] 1P 16 (32) 2.4 2.9 16 × 512 64 128 DDR4-2666
8 channels
155/170 W June 2017
[15]
0 $750+
EPYC 7401P[12] [13][14] 24 (48) 2.0 2.8 3.0 24 × 512 $1075+
EPYC 7551P[12][13][14] 32 (64) 2.55 32 × 512 180 W $2100+
EPYC 7251[12][13][14] 2P 8 (16) 2.1 2.9 8 × 512 32 DDR4-2400
8 channels
120 W 0 $475+
EPYC 7261[16] 2.5 64 DDR4-2666
8 channels
155/170 W Mid 2018 0$700+
EPYC 7281[12][13][14] 16 (32) 2.1 2.7 16 × 512 32 June 2017
[15]
0 $650+
EPYC 7301[12][13][14] 2.2 64 0$800+
EPYC 7351[12][13][14] 2.4 2.9 $1100+
EPYC 7371[17] 3.1 3.6 3.8 180 W Late 2018 $1550+
EPYC 7401[12][13][14] 24 (48) 2.0 2.8 3.0 24 × 512 155/170 W June 2017
[15]
$1850+
EPYC 7451[12][13][14] 2.3 2.9 3.2 180 W $2400+
EPYC 7501[12][13][14] 32 (64) 2.0 2.6 3.0 32 × 512 155/170 W $3400+
EPYC 7551[12][13][14] 2.55 180 W $3400+
EPYC 7601[12][13][14] 2.2 2.7 3.2 $4200+


Second generation Epyc (Rome)Edit

In November 2018 AMD announced Epyc 2 at their Next Horizon event, the second generation of Epyc processors code-named "Rome" and based on the Zen 2 microarchitecture.[18] The processors feature up to eight 7 nm-based "chiplet" processors with a 14 nm-based IO chip in the center interconnected via Infinity Fabric. The processors support up to 8 channels of DDR4 RAM up to 4 TB, and introduce support for PCIe 4.0. These processors have up to 64 cores with 128 SMT threads per socket.[19] The 7 nm "Rome" is manufactured by TSMC.[10] It was released on August 7, 2019.[20]

Model Socket configuration Cores (threads) Clock rate (GHz) Cache PCIe Lanes Memory support TDP Socket Release date Release price (USD)
Base Boost L2 (KiB) L3 (MiB)
All-core Max
EPYC 7232P 1P 8 (16) 3.1 3.2 8 x 512 32 128 DDR4-3200

eight-channel

120 W SP3 August 7, 2019 $450
EPYC 7302P 16 (32) 3 3.3 16 x 512 128 155 W $825
EPYC 7402P 24 (48) 2.8 3.35 24 x 512 180 W $1250
EPYC 7502P 32 (64) 2.5 3.35 32 x 512 $2300
EPYC 7702P 64 (128) 2 3.35 64 x 512 256 200 W $4425
EPYC 7252 2P 8 (16) 3.1 3.2 8 x 512 64 120 W $475
EPYC 7262 3.2 3.4 128 155 W $575
EPYC 7272 12 (24) 2.9 3.2 12 x 512 64 120 W $625
EPYC 7282 16 (32) 2.8 3.2 16 x 512 $650
EPYC 7302 3 3.3 128 155 W $978
EPYC 7352 24 (48) 2.3 3.2 24 x 512 $1350
EPYC 7402 2.8 3.35 180 W $1783
EPYC 7452 32 (64) 2.35 3.35 32 x 512 155 W $2025
EPYC 7502 2.5 3.35 180 W $2600
EPYC 7542 2.9 3.4 225 W $3400
EPYC 7552 48 (96) 2.2 3.3 48 x 512 192 200 W $4025
EPYC 7642 2.3 3.3 256 225 W $4775
EPYC 7702 64 (128) 2 3.35 64 x 512 200 W $6450
EPYC 7742 2.25 3.4 225 W $6950


Third generation Epyc (Milan)Edit

At the HPC-AI Advisory Council in the United Kingdom in October 2019, AMD stated specifications for Milan, Epyc chips based on the Zen 3 microarchitecture.[21] Milan chips will use Socket SP3, with up to 64 cores on die, and support eight DDR4 SDRAM and PCIe 4.0 channels.[21] It also announced plans for the subsequent generation of chips, codenamed Genoa, that will be based on the Zen 4 microarchitecture and use Socket SP5.[21]

Embedded (Snowy Owl)Edit

In February 2018, AMD also announced the EPYC 3000 series of embedded Zen CPUs.[22]

Model Release
date
Cores
(threads)
Clock rate (GHz) Cache Memory
support
TDP
Base Boost L1
(KiB)
L2
(KiB)
L3
(MiB)
All-core Max
EPYC 3101 February 2018 4 (4) 2.1 2.9 2.9 64 (I) / 32 (D) 4 × 512 8 DDR4-2666
dual-channel
35 W
EPYC 3151 4 (8) 2.7 2.9 2.9 64 (I) / 32 (D) 4 × 512 16 45 W
EPYC 3201 8 (8) 1.5 3.1 3.1 64 (I) / 32 (D) 8 × 512 16 DDR4-2133
dual-channel
30 W
EPYC 3251 8 (16) 2.5 3.1 3.1 64 (I) / 32 (D) 8 × 512 DDR4-2666
dual-channel
50 W
EPYC 3301 12 (12) 2.0 2.15 3.0 64 (I) / 32 (D) 12 × 512 32 DDR4-2666
quad-channel
65 W
EPYC 3351 12 (24) 1.9 2.75 3.0 64 (I) / 32 (D) 12 × 512 80 W
EPYC 3401 16 (16) 1.85 2.25 3.0 64 (I) / 32 (D) 16 × 512 32 85 W
EPYC 3451 16 (32) 2.15 2.45 3.0 64 (I) / 32 (D) 16 × 512 100 W


Chinese variantsEdit

A variant created for the Chinese server market by a AMD–Chinese joint venture is the Hygon Dhyana system on a chip.[23][24] It is noted to be a variant of the AMD EPYC, and is so similar that "there is little to no differentiation between the chips".[23] It has been noted that there is "less than 200 lines of new kernel code" for Linux kernel support, and that the Dhyana is "mostly a re-branded Zen CPU for the Chinese server market".[24]

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Cutress, Ian. "Computex 2017: AMD Press Event Live Blog". www.anandtech.com.
  2. ^ Kampman, Jeff (16 May 2017). "AMD's Naples datacenter CPUs will make an Epyc splash". Tech Report. Retrieved 16 May 2017.
  3. ^ Cutress, Ian (20 June 2017). "AMD's Future in Servers: New 7000-Series CPUs Launched and EPYC Analysis". Anandtech. Retrieved 12 July 2017.
  4. ^ https://www.anandtech.com/show/14568/an-interview-with-amds-forrest-norrod-naples-rome-milan-genoa
  5. ^ Kampman, Jeff (7 March 2017). "AMD's Naples platform prepares to take Zen into the datacenter". Tech Report. Retrieved 7 March 2017.
  6. ^ Cutress, Ian (7 March 2017). "AMD Prepares 32-Core Naples CPUs for 1P and 2P Servers: Coming in Q2". Anandtech. Retrieved 7 March 2017.
  7. ^ Shrout, Ryan (20 June 2017). "AMD EPYC 7000 Series Data Center Processor Launch – Gunning for Xeon | Architectural Outlook". www.pcper.com. Retrieved 9 August 2019.
  8. ^ Morgan, Timothy Prickett (May 17, 2017). "AMD Disrupts The Two-Socket Server Status Quo". www.nextplatform.com.
  9. ^ Morris, John (March 13, 2018). "Inside GlobalFoundries' long road to the leading edge". ZDNet. Retrieved 17 July 2019.
  10. ^ a b Smith, Ryan (July 26, 2018). "AMD "Rome" EPYC CPUs to Be Fabbed By TSMC". AnandTech. Retrieved 18 June 2019.
  11. ^ a b De Gelas, Johan; Cutress, Ian (11 July 2017). "Sizing Up the Servers: Intel's Skylake-SP Xeon vs AMD's EPYC 7000". Anandtech. Retrieved 11 July 2017.
  12. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l "AMD EPYC™ 7000 Series Processors: Leading Performance for the Cloud Era" (PDF). Advanced Micro Devices, Inc. August 2018. p. 2.
  13. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l Cutress, Ian (20 June 2017). "AMD's Future in Servers: New 7000-Series CPUs Launched and EPYC Analysis". Anand Tech. Retrieved 21 June 2017.
  14. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l Cutress, Ian (20 June 2017). "AMD EPYC Launch Event Live Blog". Anand Tech. Retrieved 21 June 2017.
  15. ^ a b c Kennedy, Patrick (16 May 2017). "AMD EPYC New Details on the Emerging Server Platform". Serve The Home. Retrieved 16 May 2017.
  16. ^ "AMD EPYC™ 7261 | AMD". www.amd.com. Retrieved 2019-01-20.
  17. ^ "AMD PS7371BEVGPAF EPYC 7371 3.1GHz 16-Core". www.gamepc.com. Retrieved 2019-01-20.
  18. ^ "AMD Takes High-Performance Datacenter Computing to the Next Horizon". AMD. Retrieved 2018-12-06.
  19. ^ Gordon Mah Ung (2018-11-07). "What AMD's 64-core 'Rome' server CPU tells us about Ryzen 2". PCWorld. Retrieved 2018-11-08.
  20. ^ "2nd Gen AMD EPYC™ Processors Set New Standard for the Modern Datacenter with Record-Breaking Performance and Significant TCO Savings". AMD. August 7, 2019. Retrieved August 8, 2019.
  21. ^ a b c Alcorn, Paul (5 October 2019). "AMD dishes on Zen 3 and Zen 4 architecture, Milan and Genoa roadmap". Tom's Hardware. Retrieved 5 October 2019.
  22. ^ Alcorn, Paul (21 February 2018). "AMD Launches Ryzen Embedded V1000, EPYC Embedded 3000 Processors". tom's HARDWARE. Retrieved 5 April 2018.
  23. ^ a b Alcorn, Paul (6 July 2018). "China Finds Zen: Begins Production Of x86 Processors Based On AMD's IP". Tom's Hardware. Retrieved 9 July 2018.
  24. ^ a b Larabel, Michael (9 June 2018). "Hygon Dhyana: Chinese x86 Server CPUs Based On AMD Zen". Phoronix. Retrieved 9 July 2018.