Curbed is an American real estate and urban design website originally founded by Lockhart Steele[2] [3] [4] in 2006 as a blog.

Curbed
Curbed logo.svg
Type of site
News website
Available inEnglish
OwnerVox Media
URLcurbed.com
Alexa rankNegative increase 4,972 (September 2018)[1]
CommercialYes
RegistrationOptional
Launched2006; 14 years ago (2006)
Current statusActive

The full website, founded in 2010, featured sub-pages dedicated to specific real estate markets and metropolitan areas across the United States. Steele once described Curbed.com as "Architectural Digest after a three-martini lunch.” The site hosted an annual contest, the Curbed Cup, to pick the best neighborhood in each city.[5] Nice Try!, a Curbed podcast about utopias, was produced in 2019.

On November 10, 2013, The New York Times reported that Vox Media had purchased the Curbed Network, which, apart from Curbed, also included dining website Eater and fashion website Racked.[6] The paper reported that the cash-and-stock deal was worth between $20 million and $30 million.[6]

As of 2020, as a part of a downward trend of layoffs and restructuring of manmy venture capital-funded sites, and the effects of the COVID-19 pandemic, many of Curbed's area-specific sites closed, leaving New York City as the sole remaining metropolitan focus. As of October 13, 2020, Curbed became a sub-page of New York Magazine.[7]

Former sub-pages specific to metropolitan areas and real estate markets included:

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ "curbed.com Site Info". Alexa Internet. Retrieved September 1, 2018.
  2. ^ Mitchell, Dan (October 30, 2007). "Not All Is Gloomy in Real Estate: A Blog Network Attracts Capital". The New York Times. Retrieved January 6, 2013.
  3. ^ "About Curbed". Curbed. Archived from the original on February 15, 2013. Retrieved January 6, 2013.
  4. ^ Oppenheimer, Mark (March 19, 2010). "The Optimist's Blogger". The New York Times Magazine. Retrieved January 6, 2013.
  5. ^ Wilkey, Robin (January 4, 2013). "San Francisco Best Neighborhood Of 2012: Lower Haight Takes The Curbed Cup". HuffPost. Retrieved January 6, 2013.
  6. ^ a b Kaufman, Leslie (November 10, 2013). "Vox Media Buying Curbed.com Network of Sites". The New York Times. Retrieved November 10, 2013.
  7. ^ "Curbed Is Now at Home at New York We can't imagine a better fit". New York Magazine. October 13, 2020.
  8. ^ "Curbed Atlanta's greatest hits". atlanta.curbed.com. Retrieved October 8, 2020.
  9. ^ "Curbed Austin's greatest hits". austin.curbed.com. Retrieved October 8, 2020.
  10. ^ "Curbed Boston's greatest hits". boston.curbed.com. Retrieved October 8, 2020.
  11. ^ "Curbed Chicago's greatest hits". chicago.curbed.com. Retrieved October 8, 2020.
  12. ^ "Curbed Detroit's greatest hits". detroit.curbed.com. Retrieved October 8, 2020.
  13. ^ "We've closed up shop". hamptons.curbed.com. Retrieved November 1, 2019.
  14. ^ "Curbed LA Is Closing". la.curbed.com. Retrieved October 8, 2020.
  15. ^ "Curbed Miami's Greatest Hits". miami.curbed.com. Retrieved November 1, 2019.
  16. ^ "Curbed New Orleans's greatest hits". nola.curbed.com. Retrieved November 1, 2019.
  17. ^ "Curbed Philly's greatest hits". philly.curbed.com. Retrieved October 8, 2020.
  18. ^ "Curbed SF Is Closing". sf.curbed.com. Retrieved October 8, 2020.
  19. ^ "Curbed Seattle's greatest hits". seattle.curbed.com. Retrieved October 8, 2020.
  20. ^ "Curbed Curbed DC's greatest hits". dc.curbed.com. Retrieved October 8, 2020.

External linksEdit