Commission to Study the Organization of Peace

The Commission to Study the Organization of Peace (CSOP), was an organization established during World War II to promote the formation of a United Nations as successor to the failed League of Nations.[1][2][3][4]

Commission to Study the Organization of Peace (CSOP)
Formation1939
Extinction1973 or later
PurposePromote world peace
Headquarters8 West Fortieth Street, New York City
Location
FieldsPeace
Chairman
William Allan Nielson
Executive Chairman
Clyde Eagleton
Vice-Chairman
Executive Director
Malcolm W. Davis, Lucius R. Eastman, Benjamin Gerig, Roger S. Greene, Emily Hickman, Pauline Mandigo, Quincy Wright
SecessionsCommittee for the Marshall Plan

Contents

HistoryEdit

In 1939, Professor James T. Shotwell of Columbia University, Professor Clyde Eagleton of New York University, Quincy Wright of the University of Chicago, and League of Nations Association director Clark Eichelberger co-founded the Commission to Study the Organization of Peace. Supporters included U.S. President Franklin Delano Roosevelt, U.S. Secretary of State Cordell Hull, and Undersecretary of State Sumner Welles.[1][2]

On December 30, 1942 letter to New York State Governor Herbert H. Lehman, executive director Clark Eichelberger described progress to date made by the commission: a First Report (November 1940) regarding fundamentals of lasting (world) peace, a Second Report (undated) regarding problems in reconstruction after World War II, and a Third Report (due out in 1943) regarding the formation of the United Nations "to carry out the principles of the Atlantic Charter."[5]

In November 1943 (some time after November 5, 1943[6]), the CSOP published a 27-page Fourth Report on the "Fundamentals of the International Organization." In it, the commission stated its determination to form a United Nations organization differently from the method to devise the earlier (unsuccessful) League of Nations. The method followed to form the League of Nation was to "draft a constitution in broad, firm outlines and leave it to the future to fill in the details." The CSOP advocated an alternative method to form a succeeding United Nations, "to begin with the details and work out through them to a completed whole."[6]

MembersEdit

In 1942,[5] CSOP members included:

  • James T. Shotwell, Chairman
  • Margaret Olson, Secretary
  • Clark Eichelberger, Executive Director
  • Executive Committee:
    • William Allan NielsonExecutive Chairman
    • Clyde Eagleton, Vice-Chairman
    • Members: Malcolm W. Davis, Lucius R. Eastman, Benjamin Gerig, Roger S. Greene, Emily Hickman, Pauline Mandigo, Quincy Wright
  • Studies Committee:
    • Clyde Eagleton, Chairman
    • Members: Malcolm W. Davis, Benjamin Gerig, Harry Gideonse, Carter Goodrich, Willam P. Maddox, Walter Sharp, Quincy Wright

In 1943,[6]"Leo Szilard Papers: Commission to Study the Organization of Peace". Calisphere: University of California. 18 May 1950. Retrieved 23 November 2017.</ref> members included: James T. Shotwell (Chairman), Allen D. Albert, Mary Noel Arrowsmith, Henry A. Arkinson, Ruhl J. Bartlett, Clarence A. Berdahl, Arthur E. Bestor, Frank G. Boudreau MD, Phillips Bradley, Esther Caukin Brunauer, James B. Carey, Ben M. Cherrington, John L. Childs, E. J. Coil, Kenneth Colegrove, J. B. Condliffe, Edward A. Conway, Merle Curd, Marion Cuthbert, Mrs. Harvey N. Davis, Malcohn W. Davis, Monroe E. Deutsch, Marshall E. Dimock, Ursula Hubbard Duffus, Clark M. Eichelberger, William Emerson, Philo T. Farnsworth, Edgar J. Fisher, Denna F. Fleming, Margaret E. Forsyth, Harry D. Gideonse, Virginia C. Gildersleeve, Arthur J. Goldsmith, Carter Goodrich, Roger S. Greene, Pennington Haile, J. Eugene Harley, Henry I. Harriman, Walter D. Head, Amy Hewes, Emily Hickman, Melvin D. Hildreth, Edward H. Hume, MD, Erling M. Hunt, Samuel Guy Inman, Oscar I. Janowsky, Alvin Johnson, Anne Hartwell Johnstone, B. H. Kizer, John I. Knudson, Hans Kohn, Walter M. Kotschnig, Walter H. C. Laves, Katherine Lenroot Beryl H. Levy, Frank Lorimer, Pauline E. Mandigo, Charles E. Martin, F. Dean McClusky, Francis E. McMahon, Frederick C. McKee, William P. Merrill, Hugh Moore, George W. Morgan, Laura Puffer Morgan, S. D. Myres Jr, Philip C. Nash, William Allan Neilson, G. Bernard Noble, Ernest Minor Patterson, James G. Patton, Ralph Barton Perry, James P. Pope, Richard J. Purcell, C. Eden Quainton, Harry B. Reynolds, Leland Rex Robinson, Chester H. Rowell, John A. Ryan, Sanford Schwarz, Hans Simons, Preston Slosson, Eugene Staley, Waldo E. Stephens, Arthur Sweetser, Elbert D. Thomas, Channing H. Tobias, Sarah Wambaugh, Edith E. Ware, Robert J. Watt, W. W. Waymack, Ernest H. Wilkins, C.-E. A. Winslow MD, Richard R. Wood, Quincy Wright, James Fulton Zimmerman

In 1962, executive committee members included: James T. Shotwell (honorary chairman), Arthur N. Holcombe (chairman), Clarence A. Berdahl, Inis L. Claude Jr., Benjamin V. Cohen, Oscar A. de Lima, Clark M. Eichelberger, Leland M. Goodrich, Charles C. Price, James R. Warburg, Richard R. Wood, Quincy Wood.[7]

The committee continued its existence into the 1950s[8] (when its address was 41 East 65th Street, New York City)[9], the 1960s (when its address was 345 East 46th Street, New York City),[7] and as late as 1970[10] and 1973,[11], when it was still publishing reports

LegacyEdit

Clark Eichelberger and Herbert H. Lehman were both later members of the Committee for the Marshall Plan (1947–1948).

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ a b Thronveit, Trygve (2011). "A Strange Fate: Quincy Wright and the Trans-War Trajectory of Wilsonian Internationalism" (PDF). White House Studies. Nova Science Publishers, Inc.: 362 (Wright) 370 (CSOP). Retrieved 23 November 2017.
  2. ^ a b Hillman, Robert P. (1998). "Quincy Wright and the Commission to Study the Organization of Peace". Global Governance. Heine. Retrieved 23 November 2017.
  3. ^ Simpson, Smith (1 September 1941). "The Commission to Study the Organization of Peace". American Political Science Review. American Political Science Association. Retrieved 23 November 2017.
  4. ^ Noble, G. Bernard (1 September 1941). "The Commission to Study the Organization of Peace: Preliminary Report and Monographs". American Political Science Review. American Political Science Association. Retrieved 23 November 2017.
  5. ^ a b Eichelberger, Clark (30 December 1942). "letter to Herbert H. Lehman" (PDF). p. 1. Retrieved 23 November 2017.
  6. ^ a b c "Fourth Report: Fundamentals of the International Organization". Commission to Study the Organization of Peace. November 1943. pp. 4 (members), 5 (methods), 25 (November 5 date). Retrieved 23 November 2017.
  7. ^ a b "Fifteenth Report: Need for a Universal United Nations". Commission to Study the Organization of Peace. July 1962. Retrieved 23 November 2017.
  8. ^ Holcombe, Arthur N. (1953). Strengthening the United Nations: Commission to Study the Organization of Peace. Harper & Brothers. Retrieved 23 November 2017.
  9. ^ "Leo Szilard Papers: Commission to Study the Organization of Peace". Calisphere: University of California. 18 May 1950. Retrieved 23 November 2017.
  10. ^ "Report of the Commission to Study the Organization of Peace". Commission to Study the Organization of Peace. 1970. Retrieved 23 November 2017.
  11. ^ Building the Peace: Reports of the Commission to Study the Organization of Peace, 1939-1972. Scarecrow Press. 1973. Retrieved 23 November 2017.

External sourcesEdit