In Greek mythology, Clymenus /ˈklɪmɪnəs/ (Ancient Greek: Κλύμενος, romanizedKlúmenos means "notorious" or "renowned"[1]) may refer to multiple individuals:

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Robin Hard. The Routledge Handbook of Greek Mythology (2004)
  2. ^ Homer, Odyssey, 3. 452
  3. ^ Pseudo-Apollodorus, Bibliotheca 1. 8. 1
  4. ^ Hesiod, Ehoiai fr. 98 as cited in Berlin Papyri, No. 9777
  5. ^ Antoninus Liberalis, Metamorphoses 2
  6. ^ Hyginus, Fabulae 175
  7. ^ Pausanias, Description of Greece, 2. 35. 4
  8. ^ Stephanus of Byzantium s. v. Aspledōn
  9. ^ a b c Pausanias, Description of Greece, 9. 37. 1
  10. ^ Scholia on Apollonius Rhodius, Argonautica, 1. 185
  11. ^ Scholia on Iliad, 16. 572
  12. ^ Pseudo-Apollodorus, Bibliotheca 2. 4. 11
  13. ^ 154 Hyginus Fabulae
  14. ^ Pseudo-Apollodorus, Bibliotheca, Epitome of Book 4, 7. 26 ff
  15. ^ Ovid, Metamorphoses, 5. 98
  16. ^ Not to be confused with Heracles the hero; cf. Strabo, Geographica, 8.3.30: "What is more, the Olympian Games are an invention of theirs [the Daktyloi]; and it was they who celebrated the first Olympiads, for one should disregard the ancient stories both of the founding of the temple and of the establishment of the games - some alleging that it was Herakles, one of the Idaian Daktyloi, who was the originator of both, and others, that it was Herakles the son of Alkmene and Zeus, who also was the first to contend in the games and win the victory; for such stories are told in many ways, and not much faith is to be put in them."
  17. ^ Pausanias, Description of Greece, 5. 8. 1
  18. ^ Pausanias, Description of Greece, 6. 21. 6
  19. ^ Hyginus, Fabulae, 206
  20. ^ Parthenius. Erotica Pathemata, 13.1
  21. ^ Stephanus of Byzantium s. v. Axia
  22. ^ Athenaeus, Banquet of the Learned, 14. 624e
  23. ^ Valerus Flaccus, Argonautica, 1. 369